Beers Made By Walking Bend 2015

Beers Made By Walking is making a return to Bend and Central Oregon in 2015. Three hikes with Crux, Worthy and Deschutes (one each, that is).

Last year I had the privilege of going on the hike with Deschutes. I am signed up for the hikes with Crux and Worthy so far and hope to be on the Deschutes hike this year too.

Here’s my pitch. You get to go on a lovely hike in Central Oregon in some of the loveliest areas we have. You are accompanied by someone from ONDA and Eric Steen of Beers Made By Walking; so folks interested in the local flora, amongst other things. You also get a brewer and perhaps some other folks from one of our local breweries. The brewer not only connects with their local region but is inspired by it to make a beer based on the hike. Later this summer you get to drink those beers at a benefit for ONDA. Everybody wins all around. [See last year’s post (linked above) for some about the Scout Camp hike with Deschutes and the benefit later at BTBS.]

Beers Made Walking logo

Beers Made By Walking Announces

2015 Hikes with Breweries in Bend

Beers Made By Walking, the program that invites brewers go on nature hikes and make beer inspired by plants found on the trail, has partnered with the Oregon Natural Desert Association for a series of three hikes with brewers in the high desert of Central Oregon. Hikers will be accompanied by a local brewer. Hikes are free and open to the public, but space is limited.

Brewers attending hikes are challenged to create a unique beer that serves as a drinkable, landscape portrait of the trails that are walked. The resulting beers will be served at a special event in the late summer, in Bend, and proceeds from the beer will benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

The first hike is on May 20 with Crux Fermentation Project and registration is now open. Registration for the next two hikes begins one month from the hike date. The remaining hikes are on June 12 with Worthy Brewing and July 24 with Deschutes Brewery. Hikes take place in past and present ONDA wilderness proposal areas. [Note this means registration IS open for the Worthy hike in June.]

Hike Dates and Info

May 20, 9am-2pm – Scout Camp – Register Here

Breweries: Crux Fermentation Project

Description: Take a hike with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Crux Fermentation Project on the Scout Camp Trail. The trail is a 3 mile loop that is very steep in some places, and includes a short scramble over a rock shelf. Trekking poles are recommended if you have them! Also bring sturdy shoes, lunch, and plenty of water.

June 12, 9am-2pm – Badlands – Register Here

Breweries: Worthy Brewing

Description: Explore the Badlands with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Worthy Brewing. Wind through inflated lava and old-growth juniper forests. Take in views of impressive rock formations, and opportunities to scramble to view points of the Cascade mountains. Wear sturdy hiking shoes, pack a lunch and plenty of water.

July 24, 8am – 5pm – Black Canyon – Register Here

Breweries: Deschutes Brewery

Description: Hike Sutton Mountain’s Black Canyon with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Deschutes Brewery. Part of the John Day River Basin, this out and back hike will have some rocky terrain and slight elevation gain. Prepare for warm weather, pack a lunch and extra food, snacks, plenty of water, and sun-protection.

About Oregon Natural Desert Association:

Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) exists to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert. Our vision is to see millions of acres of beautiful and ecologically vital public land permanently protected, home to diverse populations of wildlife, and available for people to enjoy forever. Working in partnership with more than 4,000 members and supporters, ONDA is the only group dedicated exclusively to the conservation of Oregon’s high desert rivers and landscapes. http://onda.org/

About Beers Made By Walking:

Beers Made By Walking is a program that invites people to step outside and see the place they live in a new light. We invite brewers to take nature walks and make beer inspired by the plants identified on the trail. Since 2011, we have worked with over 90 breweries in Oregon, Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington. Our hiking and tasting events act as educational and fundraising programs for environmental organizations in the regions we serve.

BMBW website /// BMBW Facebook /// BMBW Twitter

I hope to see some of you on these hikes! I know I’ll see the Moody’s on one of them.

Beer book reading update

Yesterday on my other blog I posted about some issues in life and letting some things go, hopefully in a non-judgmental way. But it is difficult.

I am currently having to let go of some things that are part of how I have defined myself lately. That hasn’t been going all that well and letting things go will most likely mean any “progress” will also be delayed. Which complicates things. ::sigh::

Books

Anyway, in the spirit of disclosure in that post I want to do the same here. The following is a list of beer-related books I have read sometime in the past 17 months or so and have not yet reviewed.

Some will not be. Even though I am not a huge believer in “Don’t say anything unless…,” I will not be reviewing some. Besides, often my gripes aren’t as generalizable as I would hope, which is a good reason to (sometimes) keep them to myself.

Some I definitely hope to still review. No idea when though. Or if. I said “hope to.”

[Dates are date finished.]

Posts

On the same note, the same needs to happen with so many blog posts. I am so far behind. I don’t know how I’m supposed to be a beer blogger if I don’t actually blog about the beer things I do.

Things from two years ago. Things from two days ago. … [I was going to make a list but not sure I see the point right now.]

Letting go

I must come to grips with letting much of this stuff go, at least for a while, for the sake of my health.

Maybe some of the reviews and/or posts will get written some day. For now, I am moving them completely “off the table” though.

If you don’t feel the need to follow a beer blogger who isn’t really blogging much of his beer events or beer-related musings I fully understand.

Dunlop – Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana by Pete Dunlop; intro by Angelo De Ieso

Date read: 26-30 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Pete Dunlop's Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Paperback, 143 pages

Published 2013 by American Palate, a division of The History Press

Source: Own

Contents:

  • Foreword, by Angelo De Ieso
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Prologue
  • 1: Beginnings: Weinhard’s Beachhead
  • 2: Wrong Way: Road to Prohibition
  • 3: Prohibition: An Unwanted Disaster
  • 4. Repeal: Happy Days Are Here Again
  • 5: Long Shadow: Blitz-Weinhard’s Decline and Legacy
  • 6: Changing Times: The Origins of Craft
  • 7: Crucial Element: The Brewpub Revolution
  • 8: Building Beervana: Craft Beer Goes Mainstream
  • Epilogue. Why Portland?
  • Appendix I. SB 813 (Brewpub Bill)
  • Appendix II. Beerology [glossary]
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • About the Author

I started and read a good bit more than half of this in Portland last week. I own and have read one other book in this series, Bend Beer, by my friend Jon Abernathy. I know that Jon used Dunlop’s book as a model, and a good one it is.

Pete Dunlop is well-qualified to write this book. He’s been in Portland since 1989, has a masters degree in history, has taught high school journalism, and has worked in marketing communication [author bio]. You can find his Beervana Buzz blog here.

Easy. Quick. Informative. Dunlop offers reasons for “Why Portland?” but knows (and demonstrates) that it was/is complex and there are other possible ways to tell the story.

Highly recommended! Not just for fans of Portland beer and breweries but for anyone interested in some of the issues that led to the most breweries in a “single” location.

If you like beer and history then borrow this book from somewhere and read it. Or, of course, buy it. I did.

This is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge:

This is the 20th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Mallett – Malt

Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse (Brewing Elements Series) by John Mallett

Date read: 07-23 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of Malt by John Mallett

Paperback, xxvi, 297 pages

Published 2014 by Brewers Publications

Source: Own

An excellent book that leads one in a natural progression of knowledge of malt. The bottom line, malt matters.

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • 1 Harry Harlan—The ‘Indiana Jones’ of Barley
  • 2 Malt: The Soul of Beer
  • 3 History of Malting
  • Malthouse Tour—Floor Malting in Great Britain
  • 4 From Barley to Malt
  • 5 Specialty Malts
  • Malthouse Tour—Full Scale Modern Malting
  • 6 Malt Chemistry
  • 7 Malt Family Descriptions
  • 8 Barley Anatomy and Agriculture
  • Malthouse Tour—Craft Micro-Maltsters
  • 9 Barley Varieties
  • 10 Malt Quality and Analysis
  • 11 Malt Handling and Preparation
  • 12 Milling
  • Appendix A: Commercially Available Malts
  • App. B: Worldwide and North american Malthouse Capacities
  • App. C: Craft Maltster Listing
  • App. D: Introduction to Home Malting (by George de Piro, reprinted with permission from Zymurgy)
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Commentary

The Brewers Publications Brewing Elements series also contains Yeast, Hops and Water. I do not own, nor have I read, Yeast. I own and have read Hops. I own but have not yet read Water. Turns out the three I own were all pre-ordered from Amazon, varying from exactly 6 months in advance to 3 days.

Another new book on malt is Dave Thomas’ The Craft Maltsters’ Handbook.  Thomas wrote the Foreword for this book (and a blurb on the back). He writes:

“Recently, our paths crossed again when we realized we were both writing books about malt. Mine, The Craft Maltsters’ Handbook, recently published by White Mule Press (Hayward, California), and John’s book published by the Brewers Association (Boulder, Colorado). When we bumped into each other at the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, I asked John about possible redundancies between our two projects. He heartily replied’ “don’t worry; yours is written from the maltster’s point of view and mine is the brewer’s perspective. They will complement each other!” He was right. They do nicely.

John talks about the “heavy-lifting” that malt does for brewers. In this book, John has done the heavy lifting for us by presenting (in a very readable fashion) the chemistry of malt carbohydrates, sugars, amino acids, proteins, and lipids. …” (xiii-xiv).

John Mallett is Director of Operations at Bell’s Brewery. His qualifications for writing this book are first-rate. Here’s an interview with Mallett and others.

1 Harry Harlan—The ‘Indiana Jones’ of Barley

Wow! We really do owe Harry Harlan—and Mary Martini—a massive debt of gratitude.

“… she would become a life-long collaborator and great friend to Harlan during his adventures in the world of barley. Together they bred, grew, and assessed new varieties in the US for many years, helping to create the scientific basis for modern barley variety development” (5).

And what adventures he had traveling the world and collecting over 5000 varieties of barley (7)! Seriously, Harry Harlan and Mary Martini’s work needs much greater exposure.

I don’t intend to say a lot about this book, other than it is excellent, nor am I going to do a detailed layout of its Table of Contents, which is a good bit more detailed than above. The chapter titles are quite honest in their description and coverage, though.

The two books in the Brewing Elements Series, from Brewers Association, that I have read contain a wealth of quality information. I suspect the other two do also and am looking forward to reading Water.

This is cross-posted at my other bog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge.

This is the 18th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Yaeger – Oregon Breweries

Oregon Breweries by Brian Yaeger

Date read: 08 February – 19 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Yaeger's Oregon Breweries book

Paperback, xx, 396 pages

Published 1 December 2014 by Stackpole Books

Source: Own (Amazon 3 December 2014) [According to WorldCat neither Deschutes Public Library or COCC’s Barber Library have it.]

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Portland
    • Northwest Portland
    • Southwest Portland
    • Southeast Portland
    • Northeast Portland
    • Portland Metro
  • Coastal
  • The Gorge-Eastern
  • Willamette Valley
  • Bend and Central
  • Southern
  • Beer Festivals
  • Bottle shops and Taprooms
  • Breweries to Come
  • Cheesemakers
  • Cideries
  • Portland Coffee Roasters

Commentary:

Let me state right up front that I enjoyed this book. More importantly, I find it valuable. For me, the factual data—the listing of so many of Oregon’s breweries in one place along with information on them—is what matters. The individual “story” of every brewery, or at least as told by the author, is not my main focus by any stretch, even though some are quite interesting.

I also appreciate how amazingly difficult it would be to write so many entries of basically the same information for all these breweries all the while trying to make them sound different. I would not relish that task. That said, the strain shows on occasion. And sometimes I imagine others might appreciate the author’s humor more than me.

Some “factual” and other issues first:

Full Sail is included in the Coastal group when it should be in The Gorge-Eastern, while Oregon Trail is included in Southern instead of Willamette Valley.

There are two listings of the breweries. The first is in the table of contents where they are separated into areas/regions (such as, Northwest Portland or Bend and Central) and then listed alphabetically. The second is the Brewery Locations map which lists them all alphabetically and then gives each a number that corresponds to, basically, the county it is in. That means all of the Portland breweries have one number (2) on the map.

A separate map of Portland, divided by quadrants, would be most useful!

I also realize that alpha order is easy but that doesn’t make it the right organizational tool, especially if you have multiple tools available. Some of the areas/regions would be harder than others but Coastal could go north to south or vice versa and The Gorge-Eastern could also easily go east to west, etc. That would make “small,” regional visit planning easier. This is not everybody’s use case though so not sure this is an entirely fair critique.

Each section has an intro that gives a quick overview of the region, along with a nice listing of non-beer-related places to visit. Each brewery entry generally consists of the following sections of info: Name and address, contact info, logo; textual entry; Beers brewed; The Pick; and a listing of other info like hours. Each full entry is from one to three plus pages and a few do not have The Pick and a few also do not have Beers brewed.

In the textual entry we get Yaeger’s impressions, perhaps an origin story or some other hook, and other facts or interesting tidbits. Beers brewed is what it purports to be, while The Pick is Yaeger’s pick from his visit. May not be available when you visit, of course.

The textual entry makes up most of the space in a brewery’s entry once past one page, so it is kind if interesting to see who gets more pages and who doesn’t (see, e.g., Ale Apothecary and Barley Brown’s). The final bit of info contains: Opened (year), Owner(s), Brewer(s), System, Annual production, Distribution, Hours, Tours, Takeout beer, Gift shop, Food, Extras. Some have less info at the end but most contain the same bits of data.

As I said up top, the strain of writing so many similar, yet hopefully different, entries took its toll once in a while. I certainly am not going to point out all of the minor distractions but I do want to point out a few.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales

“In the mid-eighties, Logsdon cofounded neighboring Full Sail Brewery, then colaunched yeast industry giant Wyeast Labs, so naturally the beers he and partner Chuck Porter make are yeast-forward saisons” (207).

Um, no, that doesn’t follow. “Yeast-forward” follows, perhaps. But “saison” most certainly does not. Full Sail is not particularly known for saisons and Wyeast has quite a few strains of yeast.

BricktownE Brewing Co.

“BricktownE’s location was built in the 1890s, according to owner and craft beer crusader Craig McPheeters, and a brothel used to operate upstairs. You could call their Workin’ Gal BrownE Ale, which busts a nutty flavor and mouthfeel, an homage.” (344).

Um. OK. He really did go there.

Caldera Brewing Co.

“Another amazing treat from my last visit was intended to be a replica of Red Sea, just like Mills brewed in Kona, but they accidentally left Mogli’s bourbon, chocolaty oak spirals in the fermentation tank. The resulting warming vanilla …” (347).

Wait. I’m supposed to drink beer from a brewery that can’t even begin to clean a fermentation vessel properly? If they leave physical items in their tanks accidentally, deity only knows what else is “left.” I think the story is probably something else and worded poorly. At least I hope so.

Draper Brewing

“He has experience at some small-by-most standards breweries including Lost Coast and Mad River, both in Humboldt County, which makes sense since he’s originally from Northern California. Mad River happens to be one of my favorite breweries from that area, so it stands to reason that he has folded some of the tricks he picked up there into his own operation” (350).

Not the way causation, or grammar, works. The last clause follows from the first clause of the first sentence but not from the clause it follows. The author’s liking of Mad River has nothing to do with any of the other clauses. Stackpole’s editors seem to be nodding off once in a while.

Walkabout Brewing Co.

“Nearly as popular is Jabberwocky, perhaps with the implication that each 22-ounce bottle implores you, in its best Lewis Carroll voice, to “drink me” (374).

Wrong character in a completely different work. Easy cultural references and allusions aren’t always good ones. And,, yes, I know that most people won’t get the difference, or care. But literature matters. Literary allusion matters.

Again, this had to be a very tough job and the author has done a fine job with a limited amount of space for each entry on the many, many breweries we have in Oregon. I’m not trying to nitpick by pointing out the above but show that there are some small issues; reasons for which I only rated it 4-stars.

Breweries to Come

[Keep in mind this book was released 1 December 2014; that is, is quite new]

This is a two-page listing of the breweries in the process of becoming operational; that is, in planning and/or outfitting.

Of the two mentioned for Bend, one (North Rim) has been open a while now and at least one other not listed (Monkless Belgian Ales) is also already open.

Also not listed, Craft Kitchen and Brewery is replacing Old Mill Brew Wërks, which is out of business.

Immersion Brewing has been announced.

Redmond’s scene is definitely growing. See the bottom of Jon’s post here for some new ones.

The problem with these sorts of books is that they are out-of-date as soon as they are published. For a place like Oregon even before publication. Remember, release date was not even four months ago.

I would really love to see this sort of thing as a wiki, with accompanying map(s), and various ways to slice and dice the data. Perhaps the Oregon Brewers Guild should do such a thing (just do it well!) and you could get access with SNOB membership. Wouldn’t help out-of-state visitors or the simply inquisitive and not-yet-converted.

Honestly, I just want it open and available. But who will maintain it? A definite early-21st century issue. This is not a dig on Yaeger’s book but on the entire class of book like this. His has superseded, at least partly, two other books. Neither of which is that old. His will be too. Soon.

Anyway, for the most up-to-date listing of Central Oregon breweries (and their order of operation) just look in Jon’s sidebar at the Brew Site.

Again, I think this is a darn fine book of its type. For me it will serve as a reference book (I did purchase a copy after all). I have already used it extensively in making plans for our trip this week to Portland.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge.

This is the 17th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Saunders – Dinner in the Beer Garden

Dinner in the Beer Garden by Lucy Saunders

Date read: 10-11 March 2015 (Re-read); originally read 24-27 June 2014

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Photo of cover of Lucy Saunders' Dinner in the Beer Garden

Paperback, 232 pages

Published 2013 by F&B Communications

Source: Backed on Kickstarter 6 Sep 2013 ($25) by wife, received 31 Jan 2014

[Sara helped Kickstart this book so we have a signed copy that randomly arrived one day a couple of months later. Some days that’s a joy of Kickstarter. Some days not. I read it last June but failed to review it at the time. As part of my goals for the year, starting this month, one a month, I am to review a beer book that I previously read but failed to review. That schedule may be a little tight since it will involve so much re-reading but if I can get through about six before year’s end then that’d be most of them.]

Well-illustrated with color photographs. Lest the title distract you, this is a cookbook. There is no text wasted on philosophies, disputations or similar arcana. There is an acknowledgments, a recipe index and an ingredient index, along with photo credits and an author bio. In between each recipe section there are short “profiles” of some beer gardens and related topics. Otherwise it is mostly recipes, each of which comes with a suggested beer pairing.

While this book does not eschew meat entirely, as the jacket states, “It’s a cookbook for people who like carrots and kale—as well as butter, fish, cheese and chocolate!”

Table of Contents (and commentary):

  • Appetizers (9 recipes – Bock pretzels and other sweet and/or savory things for various seasons)
  • About Tasting and Pairing Beer with Vegetables
  • Beans & Legumes (6 recipes – From salads to fried)
  • Bavaria’s Biergartens (by Lindsay Bosslett and Rick Hadsall)
  • Cheese (9 recipes – French toast to gnocchi to turnovers)
  • Estabrook Park Beer Garden (Milwaukee, WI)
  • Eggs (8 recipes)
  • August Schell Brewery Gardens (New Ulm, MN)
  • Fish & Seafood (7 recipes)
  • New Glarus Brewing Co. Hilltop Beer Garden (New Glarus, WI)
  • Greens (7 recipes)
  • Boundary Bay Brewery & Bistro (Bellingham, WA)
  • Noodles & Pasta (6 recipes)
  • Brewery Farms (Rogue, Bell’s, NY farm brewery license program, Sean Paxton, Sierra Nevada, Stone)
  • Roots (7 recipes)
  • Building a Better Beer Garden: Advice from a Pro Brewer (advice from Aaron Rzeznik, landscape designer and brewer at Witch’s Hat Brewery, South Lyon, MI)
  • Squash & Vegetables (12 recipes)
  • Virginia’s Brew Ridge Trail (Blue Mountain Brewery, Afton; Devils Backbone Brewpub, Rosedale; Wild Wolf Brewing, Nellysford; 6 breweries, Nelson and Albemarle Counties www.brewridgetrail.com )
  • Grains (6 recipes)
  • Botanical Garden Brewfests (Fest-of-the-Ale at Missouri Botanical Garden (Oct); Fest-of-Ale (month of Oct) by Atlanta Botanical Garden; Chicago Botanic Garden festival; Oregon Garden Brewfest, Silverton)
  • Sauces & Soups (8 recipes)
  • Bière de Garde Jelly by Christina Ward, Milwaukee County Master Food Preserver
  • Fruits & Desserts (13 recipes)
  • Recipe Index
  • Ingredient Index
  • Photo Index, Participating Breweries

I have already identified several recipes of interest, including a Basil-Walnut Pesto and Udon with Ginger-Garlic Broth under Noodles & Pasta; Potato-Leek Cakes with Almond Cream Sauce and Manchego Potato & Chard Tarts under Roots; Sesame Miso-glazed Squash and Cauliflower-Chickpea Cakes under Squash & Vegetables; and Carrot Risotto Cakes with Spiced Plum Relish and Millet Flatbread with Manchego and Rosemary under Grains. No doubt, others will sound scrumptious when the proper ingredients are in season.

Pairings  

For the Udon with Ginger-Garlic Broth she suggests a black IPA or hoppy American stout. I might use less ginger; in fact, would, so maybe not so big. I’m thinking Firestone Walker Wookey Jack. The rye in that can add a little of its own spice.

For the Potato-Leek Cakes with Almond Cream Sauce she suggests “a yeasty Belgian strong ale with plum and caramel notes …” (127). Mmmm. Several possibilities here.

For the Sesame Miso-glazed Squash the recommended pairing is “malt-forward lager such as Vienna or Oktoberfest [which] balances the salty miso sauce” (159).

Once in a while the recommendations are oddly specific; I am not referring to the odd Rogue or Goose Island beer or so on as several breweries did support her with locations and/or photos. But, for instance, for the Millet Flatbread with Manchego and Rosemary the recommendation is “a golden ale aged in merlot barrels, or a farmstead dry cider with enough tannins to take on the Manchego and rosemary” (178). OK. We get two recommendations. But both are incredibly specific. I agree that either, but especially the merlot barrel-aged golden, would be exquisite. Not the easiest thing to put one’s hands on, though.

I would love to go to the Fest-of-the-Ale at Missouri Botanical Garden. [ I love MOBOT! I grew up in St. Louis County and visited MOBOT many times when a kid and made it back a couple years ago.]

The Bière de Garde jelly sounds quite tasty but it involves canning. [I must say, I adore this contributor’s title, “Master Food Preserver.” Of course, I just registered for our second year at the C.O.M.G.A. Spring Gardening Seminar.]

All-in-all, this is an excellent book of primarily fruit- and vegetable-centered recipes covering dishes of all sorts to pair with beer. And while these foods could certainly be enjoyed anywhere—without or without a well-paired beer—they would be even better in a beer garden among loved ones or friends. That is what this book celebrates.

I recommend it if you can get your hands on it. Seems to be used copies out there.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge.

This is the 16th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Allen and Cantwell – Barley Wine

Barley Wine: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Styles series no. 11) by Fal Allen and Dick Cantwell

Date read: 26 February – 04 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Image of cover of Barley Wine: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes (Classic Beer Styles series no. 11) by Fal Allen and Dick Cantwell

Paperback, 198 pages

Published 1998 by Brewers Publications

Source: Own

Fal Allen is currently the head brewer at Anderson Valley Brewing Co. (AVBC). You can see more of his brewing background at that link. Dick Cantwell was one of the co-founders of Elysian Brewing in 1996 and is still their head brewer.

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: The History of Barley Wine
  • Chapter 2: The Flavor Profile of Barley Wine
  • Chapter 3: The Five Elements: Malt, Hops, Yeast, Water, and Time
  • Chapter 4: The Brewing Process
  • Chapter 5: Professional Barely Wine Breweries
  • Chapter 6: Recipes
  • Appendix A: Festivals
  • Appendix B; Troubleshooting
  • Appendix C: U.S. and Canadian Barely Wine Breweries
  • Appendix D: Unit Conversion Chart
  • Glossary
  • Further Reading
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • About the Authors

NB: Publication date 1998. At the time perhaps it made sense, but 17 years later App. C is kind of useless. Chap. 5 is better in that we get some data and descriptions, so even if the beer or brewery are long gone it still provides some context, especially compared to the others in the rest of the chapter. [This book is no. 11 in the series and no. 10 Stout (see below) also has an appendix “Commercial Stout Breweries,” which seems of the same limited value and ends with “Note: This is only a partial listing of the numerous brewers of stout.” You think?]

Introduction

“These days barley wine brewing is alive and well, if somewhat besieged in its native Britain. Its history is not continuous or easy to trace. Studying barley wine is like following footprints which disappear and reappear, forking and veering, stamping for a time in a circle and then dispersing, leaving trails that seem to go cold and then suddenly present a host of destinations. It’s an enterprise requiring a few leaps of courage and fancy simply to consider the widely variant examples and information that is part of the same theoretically coherent style. We will challenge and define the parameters of barley wine, examining every stage of the brewing process to wring the utmost from ingredients, equipment, and procedures. We will explore the contributions of each of brewing’s basic raw materials, including one not ordinarily considered—time. We will also offer practical hints based on our own home and professional brewing experience” (Introduction, 6-7).

Chapter 1: The History of Barley Wine

Seems reasonable. Anyone aware of other histories of barley wine? I like that we’re off to an inclusive start.

Chapter 2: The Flavor Profile of Barley Wine

Covers a lot of ground fairly succinctly.

“There are, in fact, a number of proper versions of the style, each with a historical and geographical precedent, and each matching the original qualities” (31).

Includes: alcohol, color and clarity, hops, age, yeast and other influences, conditioning and carbonation; “families” of barley wines: The Trent, the Thames, and Others: English Barley Wine Brewing; The Northeastern United States—The Great Between; Northwestern Barley Wines; Other Beers Defying Classification.

The “Other Beers Defying Classification” section was interesting in that it told me that Michael Jackson considered Russian Imperial stout to be a dark barley wine. I just checked his The World Guide to Beer and sure enough, pages 170-171 are “Russian stout and barley wines” (1977, First american ed.). I did not remember that. Perhaps partly due to the fact that it was many years later before I had tasted either style. I am not saying I agree with Michael, though. His reasoning was a little loose.

This section also reminded me that “in Stout, Michael Lewis considers imperial stout such a break from traditional stout styles that he devotes to it only a brief discussion (Lewis 1995)” (50). That’s right. I can find almost nothing on Imperials in it. That’s my biggest gripe with Stout. But back to this book.

Chapter 3: The Five Elements: Malt, Hops, Yeast, Water, and Time

I like how they bring out in the section on “Pale Malt” that English pale malt is best (with Maris Otter at the top) because “it has a more complex flavor than American malts, which are generally malted to microbrewery specifications” (55). That is soon to change, although mostly likely remain sparsely dispersed and very small-scale for a long while. Micromalting. Heirloom and landrace barleys. Barleys not even suspected by the macros.

Photo of emblem for the High Desert Museum exhibit Brewing Culture: The Craft of Beer

We went to the last panel discussion at the High Desert Museum as part of their exhibit, Brewing Culture: The Craft of Beer. It was Feb. 19th and this was its remit:

“Join us for a dynamic conversation with Seth Klann of Mecca Grade Estate Malt to learn how barley is farmed and malted in the High Desert. Klann will be joined by Scott Fish a barley breeding researcher and resident malster at OSU and Dustin Herb, a graduate research assistant in OSU’s Department of Crop and Soil Science whose work is on barley and malting.”

The researchers actually went first with Seth finishing before questions for everyone. Mecca Grade Estate Malt. We have locally grown barley and a micromalting facility in Central Oregon. I know there are a few around the country. Michigan, for sure. Colorado somewhere? New York? Montana? Barley region states anyway.

For far more information on this panel discussion of malt see “The day I learned about barley.”

Hmm. Ambled away from the topic at hand again.

This chapter covers some ground but does it fairly efficiently: The Malt Bill: Pale Malt, Specialty Malts, Adjuncts; Hops: Boiling Hops, Finishing Hops; Yeast: Yeast Flavor, Alcohol Tolerance, Attenuation, Flocculation, Oxygen; Water; Aging; Packaged Beer; Wood.

Chapter 4: The Brewing Process

Let’s just say that if you want to brew your first barley wine you perhaps had best read this chapter. I’m not saying it is the last word, by any means. But it gives you a good idea of how much you’ll be taxing your knowledge, your system, your ingredients and your processes.

Chapter 5: Professional Barely Wine Breweries

Provides the specifications, and variably some notes or description, on twenty barley wines, beginning with Bass No. 1. The specs provided are slightly variable and/or not available for some pieces of data on each beer. Basically: Name, Brewer, Original Gravity, Terminal Gravity, ABV, IBU, Hop Variety, Malt, Mash, Boil, Fermentation Temperature, Yeast, Fermentation Time and Aging.

Some of the other beers are Sierra Nevada Bigfoot, Fuller’s Golden Pride, Anchor Old Foghorn (1996), Thomas Hardy (1989), and Hair of the Dog Adambier.

Chapter 6: Recipes

Eleven recipes “from a wide-range of brewers and brewing backgrounds” (131) are presented and each is sized for both 5 gallons and 1 barrel. Some of the brewers are Ray Daniels, Charlie Papazian, George & Laurie Fix, Fred Eckhardt, and Randy Mosher.

Appendix A: Festivals

Clearly several more by now and The Brickskeller is closed.

Appendix B: Troubleshooting

From stuck fermentation to stuck mash and other issues in-between.

Appendix C: U.S. and Canadian Barely Wine Breweries

No doubt it was partial then; now not so much interesting even as an historical document since we have no idea of the scope of its limitations to begin with.

Appendix D: Unit Conversion Chart

Glossary

Not even sure half of those terms are in the book. And they’re mostly not indexed soit  makes it hard to verify.

For now I am recommending this book. The issues I have pointed out above are inherent in any text like this that becomes dated. My single caveat for otherwise not wholeheartedly recommending it is that I have yet to brew from it. Based on other things I have read their recommendations seem sound but I have not tested any of them in practice. Take that as you will.

This is the 15th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Citations

Lewis, Michael. Stout. First American ed. Boulder, Colo.: Brewers Publications, 1995. Print. Classic Beer Style Series, 10.

Cross-posted at habitually probing generalist for purposes of the above reading challenge.

Deschutes Street Pub

Deschutes Street Pub may be coming to a city near you. Well, seven cities after its test run here in Bend May 9th. Between 30 May and 14 Nov it will visit Philadelphia, Arlington, VA, Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Denver and Sacramento.

Deschutes Street Pub logo

“We’re super excited to announce that we’re setting up shop in your town for one day! That’s right, we’re bringing our outdoor pub of epic proportions to each of the cities below for an all out block party. Crafted from reclaimed wood and steel, our Street Pub will be a one-stop-shop to try several of our beers – from the coveted Reserve Series rarities (think The Abyss) all the way to year-round favorites like Black Butte Porter and Mirror Pond Pale Ale. Pair those beers up with culinary creations from our Executive Chef, Jeff Usinowicz, and live local music – and you have a street party that’s truly “crafted for community.”

In each city we’ll partner with a local charity so you’ll be drinking for a good cause. The amount of money raised will be determined by how much beer we sell. So, grab your friends and check out the Street Pub when it rolls through your town.”

A fine companion to Woody but on another level [Woody events]. The Street Pub uses 4296 feet of reclaimed white oak and 10,000 pounds of steel. It has 40 taps, which is quite a bit more than the Bend Pub or the PDX Pub or the brewery. Wow! Other than that—which you can learn from watching the video—there are no details, just a fleeting glimpse.

Let’s just say that they have my attention and I hope to be at the May 9th Bend test run.

Schedule available here.

Deschutes Brewery Blog post, “Street Pub – Crafted for Community.”

Boak and Bailey – Brew Britannia

Brew Britannia: The Strange Rebirth of British Beer by Jessica Boak and Ray Bailey.

Date read: 26 December 2014-23 January 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of Brew Britannia: The Strange Rebirth of British Beer by Jessica Boak and Ray Bailey

Paperback, 298 pages

Published 2014 by Aurum Press

Source: Own. Purchased from Amazon

Brew Britannia is eminently readable (except for the ultra-tiny endnote numbers) and highly enjoyable. The authors cover the last 60 years of brewing history in Britain and while there are parallels with the growth of craft beer in the US over the last 30 or so years there are also huge differences.

I believe it to be well-researched and well-written, and having read Boak & Bailey’s Beer Blog for over a year now I know that they interact enough with folks who would call BS that we can take it as a reasonably accurate portrait.

In the past two years or so I have read at least seven other British beer books and this was my favorite. This is a partially unfair judgment as some of those read are quite simply historical pieces now. They are also vastly different genres of book so it is perhaps unfair to compare them. [Mark Dredge – Craft Beer World, Pete Brown – Three Sheets to the Wind, Martyn Cornell – Beer: The Story of the Pint, Richard Boston – Beer & Skittles, Michael Jackson – The English Pub (am aware of authorship issues) and Michael Jackson’s Beer Companion, Melissa Cole – Let Me Tell You About Beer. Ian Hornsey’s Brewing, 2nd ed. is probably my overall favorite but that truly is unfair as it is a fairly technical book on the state of brewing knowledge. I do own a couple more Hornsey and RSC books that I hope to read soon (e.g., Hornsey’s Alcohol and its Role in the Evolution of Human Society).

If you are interested in the history of the British beer industry (and prior) then you should read both Cornell’s Beer: The Story of the Pint and Boak & Bailey’s Brew Britannia. Cornell begins in prehistory and comes up to around 2000 but the recent material focuses mostly on industry consolidation (breweries, pub cos) and government legislation (Beer Orders, …). Boak & Bailey are looking at only the last 60 years or so and while they certainly address the above topics they also cover the various consumer movements in far more depth. SPBW is not even in the index in Cornell (although it does appear, at least once, in the book), while CAMRA has 3 entries. In B&B, CAMRA (in multiple name variants) and sub-topics has 6.75 column inches (17 cm) of entries and SPBW has 3 entries but they cover ~11 pages. B&B also focus far more on the independent, smaller, newer breweries. Together they do a great job covering the history of British beer.

If you are more interested in the recent past or want more of a consumer focus or more on the rise of “craft” beer in Britain then definitely read Brew Britannia. It is available in both paperback and ebook and from Amazon US and UK, along with other vendors, of course.

Most of the beer books I read do not necessarily make me want to have a beer with the author/s, and often make me not want to, but between Brew Britannia and their blog these folks are the authors I would most love to have a beer (or three) with.

[Cross-posted at habitually probing generalist as that is where I am doing my reading challenges.]

This counts as my 4th book for the 2015 Nonfiction Reading Challenge and for the “A book set somewhere you’ve always wanted to visit” criterion for the 2015 Reading Challenge

Traditional Chesterfield armchair

McMenamins 2nd annual High Gravity Extravaganza

“Go Big or Go Home” is the motto of the McMenamins High Gravity Extravaganza, now in its 2nd Annual instantiation, 17 January 2015 in Bend. [We missed the 1st last year due to attending the Big Woody in Portland that same weekend. No true regrets but wondering what happened to the Big Woody.]

Since I haven’t attended I can only pass along the details and promise you that we plan on being there for certain. High-alcohol beers, music, fire pits, and more.

In the spirit of Central Oregon and the uniqueness of the High Desert in January, step out and celebrate big, bold beers while basking in the crisp winter air at the High Gravity Extravaganza at McMenamins Old St. Francis School (OSF). This second annual “Go Big or Go Home” event brings together high gravity ales from some of Central Oregon’s top breweries (list below) and McMenamins around the Northwest with a backdrop of snow-covered mountains while huddling around blazing firepits. With live music by Mark Ransom & The Mostest and Down North,  you can also stop by the brewer’s corner to meet the makers, discuss technique or just share a couple pints with friends.

When: Saturday, January 17, 2015 from 1-10 p.m.; Music begins at 3 p.m.

Where: Old St. Francis School, 700 Bond St., Bend, Ore., 97701

Beer: Joining 10 McMenamins brewers from around the Northwest are 12 local Central Oregon breweries [see below].

Cost: Free to attend, special taster pricing.

We welcome these Central Oregon Guest Breweries, pouring their bold beer samples:

  • GoodLife Brewing
  • Three Creeks Brewing
  • Bend Brewing Company
  • Solstice Brewing Company
  • Worthy Brewing Company
  • Sunriver Brewing Company
  • Wild Ride Brewing
  • Crux Fermentation Project
  • Riverbend Brewing
  • Deschutes Brewing Company
  • Boneyard Beer Company
  • Silver Moon Brewing

Participating McMenamins Breweries pouring their big and bold beer samples:

  • McMenamins on Monroe
  • High Street Brewery
  • Thompson Brewery
  • McMenamins on the Columbia Brewery
  • West Linn Brewery
  • Edgefield Brewery
  • Concordia – Kennedy School Brewery
  • Crystal Brewery
  • Old St. Francis Brewery
  • Roseburg Brewery

We are looking forward to it, as are many of our friends. We hope to see you there.