Worthy Experimental Hop Taste Test Tour

Worthy Brewing in Bend recently had on a flight of 4 beers made with experimental hops to solicit feedback on some of their potential hops from the Indie Hops and Oregon State University’s Experimental Hop Breeding Program. Roger Worthington, owner of Worthy, is also an owner of Indie Hops.

Photo of 4 taster glasses of Worthy Brewing experimental hop beers.

I participated in this at their Eastside brewery and taproom in Bend. I know what I thought of the new hops–as used in these beers–and now it is your chance as they are taking the beers on a mini-tour to several Portland locations and one in Gresham.

If you are interested in hops and would like just a smidgen of input into the future of potential hops then this is for you.

The press release follows:

WORTHY BREWING’S TOURING OREGON FOR FEEDBACK ON BEERS BREWED WITH EXPERIMENTAL HOPS

BEND, OR — Worthy Brewing will be holding tastings throughout Oregon and Washington on beers brewed with hops produced by Portland-based Indie Hops and Oregon State University’s Experimental Hop Breeding Program.

“We’re looking for the public’s feedback on the aroma and taste to help the Indie Hops/OSU program with future breeding projects,” said Worthy Brewing’s Brewmaster, Dustin Kellner. “It’s a great opportunity for craft beer lovers to help choose up-and-coming hop varieties.”

Worthy’s brewery team brewed up four pale ales using the following experimental varietals:  1007-35, C1002-37, G9-1-374 and  C115L-1.

Worthy Brewing’s team will be at the following venues holding flight tastings:

March 18 at 6-9 pm: Produce Row – 204 SE Oak St, Portland, OR 97214

March 20 6-9pm: Roscoe’s – 8105 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97215

March 25 at 2-5 pm: John’s Market – 3535 SW Multnomah Blvd, Portland, OR 97219

March 31 at 6-8 pm: Pacific Growlers – 11427 SW Scholls Ferry Rd, Beaverton, OR 97008

For more information, please contact Shannon Hinderberger at shannon@worthybrewing.com.

Worthy Brewing Company opened its doors in early 2013, delivering remarkably balanced, filtered ales that are hand-crafted using premium ingredients and the pristine water from the Cascade Mountains in Bend, Oregon. Worthy’s campus includes a large outdoor biergarten, full restaurant, and a greenhouse and hop yard onsite for growing estate and experimental hops in conjunction with Oregon State University and Indie Hops. An expansion will be completed in Spring 2017, featuring the “Hopservatory,” with a large telescope, “The Hop Mahal,” a banquet space, “The Beermuda Triangle” expanded indoor seating, and “The Star Bar,” an open air mezzanine bar.

 

Loving Deschutes, Firestone Walker and Fremont

I do not do this near often enough, so I want to pass on some of my current beer love which was prompted by a lovely lunch down at the pub yesterday.

Deschutes

Just want to give a shout out to the Deschutes Bend Public House, and Andrew in particular, for a grand lunch yesterday. Had a tasty salad and tasted 3 amazing beers and also had a taste of the production Pacific Wonderland on draft (3rd version for me; 2nd favorite).

Salad on plate, 2 taster glasses of beer, a pint of beer and a pint of water.

Black barleywine on left, Kaizen Cream Ale almost gone, and a pint of The Oregon Tr’Ale IPA

Stopped in for The Oregon Tr’Ale IPA and had tasters of Kaizen Cream Ale and Black Barley Wine. All were exquisite. The Oregon Tr’Ale is a collaboration between several local breweries (The Central Oregon Brewers Guild) for the American Hop Convention held just recently in Bend. It uses Mecca Grade malt and experimental hops from the Willamette Valley.

Deschutes, et al. The Oregon Tr'Ale bottle label

All photo credit belongs to Deschutes Brewery. Borrowed (and slightly cropped) from this tweet: https://twitter.com/DeschutesBeer/status/821881154349441024

Andrew always takes great care of me and I sincerely appreciate him and all of the staff at the Public House. Cheers!

Deschutes Brewery Bend Pubic House brewhouse on The Abyss 2016 release day (16 December 2016)

Deschutes Brewery Bend Pubic House brewhouse on The Abyss 2016 release day (16 December 2016)

The other two shout outs I want to give are to the two breweries I wish I were far closer to: Firestone Walker and Fremont.

I think of them as roughly equidistant—as in, far removed from here—but I guess they are not, in a stricter sense. According to Google maps (various routes rounded) it is ~700 miles to Paso Robles, CA (our main FW destination) from Bend or ~800 to Buellton, CA (my desire but not wife’s) and only ~330 to Seattle, Earth for Fremont.

Firestone Walker

We (the wife and I) have been loving Firestone Walker vintage beers—the “boxed beers”—since just after getting to Bend in 2012. We buy more FW “prestige” beers each year than Deschutes, since before now there simply were more FW ones (which we love) and now the Big D [my moniker for Deschutes; they are comparatively “big” in the craft beer world] is stepping up with The Abyss variants and more Pub Reserve series and such. Our taste buds and other sensory apparatus love it. Our pocketbooks do not.

Bottle, snifter full of beer, and box for Firestone Walker XX Anniversary Ale

But Parabola, Stickee Monkee, Sucaba [on hiatus this year], the Anniversary blends, Helldorado, Velvet Merkin, highly lamented Double DBA …, even the recently late and lamented Wookey Jack (perhaps my favorite black IPA/Cascadian dark). I have also loved the Luponic Distortion series. Um, where is #4 though?

Back of my wife's head taking a photo of Firestone Walker Helldorado glass and bottle with her iPad

Sara taking a picture of 2015 Helldorado blond barleywine

But those boxed beers from FW?! Oh. My. I have 47 checkins of FW beers in Untappd and they are mostly variants of the boxed beers.

Full snifter, bottle and box of 2014 Sucaba Barrel-aged Barley Wine No. 004

Fremont

Another brewery we have come to love for the same sorts of reasons is Fremont in Seattle [20 checkins]. They are masters of barrel aging and spicing and I will rarely say that of the first and, until now, never of the second.

Bottle of 2015 Coffee Edition Bourbon barrel-aged Dark Star oatmeal stout

Bottle of 2015 Coffee Edition Bourbon barrel-aged Dark Star oatmeal stout

I have had the pleasure to experience [their beers] Bourbon Barrel Abominable [B-Bomb], barrel aged Dark Star and their assorted variants. And I hope I am justified again this year but regular Dark Star Imperial Oatmeal stout in 12 oz cans, available for two months a year, is my go to again this year. I got a case last year but asked my guy to get me two this year. This would be my daily go to beer if I could have it year round. As it is I buy it in quantities nothing else compares to. Except perhaps the wife’s Oskar Blues Ten Fidy. Her go to beer.

I have also simply adored a few of Fremont’s fresh hop beers. Packaged fresh hop beers! I can only imagine how transcendent they would be at their own pub.

Bottle and two glasses of 2016 Rusty Nail Imperial Stout with cinnamon, licorice and smoked barley

2016 Rusty Nail Imperial Stout with cinnamon, licorice and smoked barley

Prairie Artisan Ales

I also want to throw a bit of love at Prairie Artisan in Tulsa, OK [8 checkins]. We have had a few things out here and they are lovely. A friend did point out the trend to incapacitating ABVs to which I had to agree, especially since even I made it in reference to one of their beers. But I consider a non-brazen 12-12.5% beer to beer fair game as long as you know what you are getting in to. We prepare for that scenario. We live that scenario.

I simply adore their labels, by the way.

Bottle and glass of Pirate Noir at BTBS

But Apple Brandy Barrel Noir, Vanilla Noir (as a non-fan of most beers with vanilla), and Pirate Noir? Simply amazing beers.

I have a second Pirate Noir, which I just had in last few days, to try in future; currently slated for 4th quarter this year. I had the Apple Brandy in July via a bottle brought home from Corvallis Brewing Supply (Love you folks!). Doubt I’ll ever get to try it again. My checkin comment was “Tastes like chocolate-covered apple brandy. It does.” That cracks me the heck up. I assume that was a good thing at the time.

Bottle and glass of Apple Brandy Barrel Noir

Untappd 2500th unique

I am one unique beer away from 2500 unique checkins on Untappd. I have decided it will be the Firestone Walker 2015 Parabola barrel-aged Imperial Stout. Not sure why I haven’t checked it in already but no worries; I will tonight after work.

Screenshot of my Untappd profile page showing 2499 unique checkins

Recap

So big love and thanks to Deschutes Bend Public House, Firestone Walker, Fremont and Prairie Artisan. I could definitely see myself spending lots of quality time at both Firestone Walker’s and Fremont’s pubs. Some day we will get there. Or so I tell myself anyway. Mighty glad though that they are distributed here.

Just wish they were closer so I could drop in and hang for an afternoon every once in a while.

Taste the High Desert: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend

The culmination of Beers Made By Walking Bend 2015 is upon us. On 16 September 2015 at Broken Top Bottle Shop 6-9 pm, the beers inspired by this year’s hikes with Crux, Worthy, and Deschutes will be on tap. I hope to see you there!

BEND-BMBW-POSTER

Wow! It looks like my last post, which was back in May, was announcing these hikes. I did manage to go on all three of them and had a wonderful time in some beautiful regions of Central Oregon. I guess I best get a post written on them along with some pictures. [I have really been slacking but then I am having some health issues.]

I want to sincerely thank Beers Made By Walking, the Oregon Natural Desert Association, and the three breweries for doing these hikes. I also want to thank my good friends at Broken Top Bottle Shop for again hosting this tasting and fundraiser for ONDA.

Below is the press release on this event:

Join Beers Made By Walking (BMBW), the Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA), and some of Bend’s best local breweries, to sample unique, new beers inspired by Oregon’s high desert.  September 16th from 6-9pm at the Broken Top Bottle Shop meet the brewers, taste three hike inspired beers, and learn about the awe-inspiring landscapes ONDA works to protect.

Early this summer, Beers Made By Walking (BMBW) invited local brewers to go on nature hikes and create new beers inspired by the plants identified on the trails. This season, BMBW collaborated with the Oregon Natural Desert Association to host three public hikes. ONDA experts led brewers from Crux Fermentation Project, Deschutes Brewery, and Worthy Brewing Co. through current and proposed wilderness areas and including the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, Scout Camp at the confluence of the Deschutes River and Whychus Creek, and Black Canyon at Sutton Mountain. The beers that come out of this collaboration are inspired by the surrounding high-desert.

For the event Worthy Brewing brewed “Walk on the Wild Side,” which was inspired by the Badlands, just east of the brewery. Their beer is with buckwheat, sage, local honey, and yarrow. After a hike at Scout Camp, Crux Fermentation Project brewed “Redbarn Farm,” a red Saison ale with rye, rosehips, and fermented with Brettanomyces, a wild yeast strain. Fresh off the hike at Black Mountain, Deschutes brewer, and BMBW veteran, Veronica Vega was leaning toward making an IPA with yarrow and black currant and is putting finishing touches on the recipe.

Entrance is free; beers may be purchased in sample or pint sizes. All proceeds benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

Bend Beers Made By Walking Tapping Event

September 16th, 6-9pm

Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend, OR 97701

Find the event on Facebook

Contributing Breweries:

Crux Fermentation Project

Deschutes Brewery

Worthy Brewing

# # #

About Beers Made By Walking

Beers Made By Walking is a program that invites brewers to make beer inspired by nature hikes and urban walks. Since 2011, BMBW has worked with over 100 breweries in six states to create place-based beers that support local, environmental organizations and causes. beersmadebywalking.com.

About Oregon Natural Desert Association

The Oregon Natural Desert Association is a Bend-based nonprofit organization that has worked to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert for more than 25 years. We’re actively working to protect stunning, ecologically significant areas in the Central Oregon Backcountry, John Day River Basin, Greater Hart-Sheldon Region and Owyhee Canyonlands. Learn more at ONDA.org

Beers Made By Walking Bend 2015

Beers Made By Walking is making a return to Bend and Central Oregon in 2015. Three hikes with Crux, Worthy and Deschutes (one each, that is).

Last year I had the privilege of going on the hike with Deschutes. I am signed up for the hikes with Crux and Worthy so far and hope to be on the Deschutes hike this year too.

Here’s my pitch. You get to go on a lovely hike in Central Oregon in some of the loveliest areas we have. You are accompanied by someone from ONDA and Eric Steen of Beers Made By Walking; so folks interested in the local flora, amongst other things. You also get a brewer and perhaps some other folks from one of our local breweries. The brewer not only connects with their local region but is inspired by it to make a beer based on the hike. Later this summer you get to drink those beers at a benefit for ONDA. Everybody wins all around. [See last year’s post (linked above) for some about the Scout Camp hike with Deschutes and the benefit later at BTBS.]

Beers Made Walking logo

Beers Made By Walking Announces

2015 Hikes with Breweries in Bend

Beers Made By Walking, the program that invites brewers go on nature hikes and make beer inspired by plants found on the trail, has partnered with the Oregon Natural Desert Association for a series of three hikes with brewers in the high desert of Central Oregon. Hikers will be accompanied by a local brewer. Hikes are free and open to the public, but space is limited.

Brewers attending hikes are challenged to create a unique beer that serves as a drinkable, landscape portrait of the trails that are walked. The resulting beers will be served at a special event in the late summer, in Bend, and proceeds from the beer will benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

The first hike is on May 20 with Crux Fermentation Project and registration is now open. Registration for the next two hikes begins one month from the hike date. The remaining hikes are on June 12 with Worthy Brewing and July 24 with Deschutes Brewery. Hikes take place in past and present ONDA wilderness proposal areas. [Note this means registration IS open for the Worthy hike in June.]

Hike Dates and Info

May 20, 9am-2pm – Scout Camp – Register Here

Breweries: Crux Fermentation Project

Description: Take a hike with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Crux Fermentation Project on the Scout Camp Trail. The trail is a 3 mile loop that is very steep in some places, and includes a short scramble over a rock shelf. Trekking poles are recommended if you have them! Also bring sturdy shoes, lunch, and plenty of water.

June 12, 9am-2pm – Badlands – Register Here

Breweries: Worthy Brewing

Description: Explore the Badlands with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Worthy Brewing. Wind through inflated lava and old-growth juniper forests. Take in views of impressive rock formations, and opportunities to scramble to view points of the Cascade mountains. Wear sturdy hiking shoes, pack a lunch and plenty of water.

July 24, 8am – 5pm – Black Canyon – Register Here

Breweries: Deschutes Brewery

Description: Hike Sutton Mountain’s Black Canyon with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Deschutes Brewery. Part of the John Day River Basin, this out and back hike will have some rocky terrain and slight elevation gain. Prepare for warm weather, pack a lunch and extra food, snacks, plenty of water, and sun-protection.

About Oregon Natural Desert Association:

Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) exists to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert. Our vision is to see millions of acres of beautiful and ecologically vital public land permanently protected, home to diverse populations of wildlife, and available for people to enjoy forever. Working in partnership with more than 4,000 members and supporters, ONDA is the only group dedicated exclusively to the conservation of Oregon’s high desert rivers and landscapes. http://onda.org/

About Beers Made By Walking:

Beers Made By Walking is a program that invites people to step outside and see the place they live in a new light. We invite brewers to take nature walks and make beer inspired by the plants identified on the trail. Since 2011, we have worked with over 90 breweries in Oregon, Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington. Our hiking and tasting events act as educational and fundraising programs for environmental organizations in the regions we serve.

BMBW website /// BMBW Facebook /// BMBW Twitter

I hope to see some of you on these hikes! I know I’ll see the Moody’s on one of them.

Yaeger – Oregon Breweries

Oregon Breweries by Brian Yaeger

Date read: 08 February – 19 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Yaeger's Oregon Breweries book

Paperback, xx, 396 pages

Published 1 December 2014 by Stackpole Books

Source: Own (Amazon 3 December 2014) [According to WorldCat neither Deschutes Public Library or COCC’s Barber Library have it.]

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Portland
    • Northwest Portland
    • Southwest Portland
    • Southeast Portland
    • Northeast Portland
    • Portland Metro
  • Coastal
  • The Gorge-Eastern
  • Willamette Valley
  • Bend and Central
  • Southern
  • Beer Festivals
  • Bottle shops and Taprooms
  • Breweries to Come
  • Cheesemakers
  • Cideries
  • Portland Coffee Roasters

Commentary:

Let me state right up front that I enjoyed this book. More importantly, I find it valuable. For me, the factual data—the listing of so many of Oregon’s breweries in one place along with information on them—is what matters. The individual “story” of every brewery, or at least as told by the author, is not my main focus by any stretch, even though some are quite interesting.

I also appreciate how amazingly difficult it would be to write so many entries of basically the same information for all these breweries all the while trying to make them sound different. I would not relish that task. That said, the strain shows on occasion. And sometimes I imagine others might appreciate the author’s humor more than me.

Some “factual” and other issues first:

Full Sail is included in the Coastal group when it should be in The Gorge-Eastern, while Oregon Trail is included in Southern instead of Willamette Valley.

There are two listings of the breweries. The first is in the table of contents where they are separated into areas/regions (such as, Northwest Portland or Bend and Central) and then listed alphabetically. The second is the Brewery Locations map which lists them all alphabetically and then gives each a number that corresponds to, basically, the county it is in. That means all of the Portland breweries have one number (2) on the map.

A separate map of Portland, divided by quadrants, would be most useful!

I also realize that alpha order is easy but that doesn’t make it the right organizational tool, especially if you have multiple tools available. Some of the areas/regions would be harder than others but Coastal could go north to south or vice versa and The Gorge-Eastern could also easily go east to west, etc. That would make “small,” regional visit planning easier. This is not everybody’s use case though so not sure this is an entirely fair critique.

Each section has an intro that gives a quick overview of the region, along with a nice listing of non-beer-related places to visit. Each brewery entry generally consists of the following sections of info: Name and address, contact info, logo; textual entry; Beers brewed; The Pick; and a listing of other info like hours. Each full entry is from one to three plus pages and a few do not have The Pick and a few also do not have Beers brewed.

In the textual entry we get Yaeger’s impressions, perhaps an origin story or some other hook, and other facts or interesting tidbits. Beers brewed is what it purports to be, while The Pick is Yaeger’s pick from his visit. May not be available when you visit, of course.

The textual entry makes up most of the space in a brewery’s entry once past one page, so it is kind if interesting to see who gets more pages and who doesn’t (see, e.g., Ale Apothecary and Barley Brown’s). The final bit of info contains: Opened (year), Owner(s), Brewer(s), System, Annual production, Distribution, Hours, Tours, Takeout beer, Gift shop, Food, Extras. Some have less info at the end but most contain the same bits of data.

As I said up top, the strain of writing so many similar, yet hopefully different, entries took its toll once in a while. I certainly am not going to point out all of the minor distractions but I do want to point out a few.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales

“In the mid-eighties, Logsdon cofounded neighboring Full Sail Brewery, then colaunched yeast industry giant Wyeast Labs, so naturally the beers he and partner Chuck Porter make are yeast-forward saisons” (207).

Um, no, that doesn’t follow. “Yeast-forward” follows, perhaps. But “saison” most certainly does not. Full Sail is not particularly known for saisons and Wyeast has quite a few strains of yeast.

BricktownE Brewing Co.

“BricktownE’s location was built in the 1890s, according to owner and craft beer crusader Craig McPheeters, and a brothel used to operate upstairs. You could call their Workin’ Gal BrownE Ale, which busts a nutty flavor and mouthfeel, an homage.” (344).

Um. OK. He really did go there.

Caldera Brewing Co.

“Another amazing treat from my last visit was intended to be a replica of Red Sea, just like Mills brewed in Kona, but they accidentally left Mogli’s bourbon, chocolaty oak spirals in the fermentation tank. The resulting warming vanilla …” (347).

Wait. I’m supposed to drink beer from a brewery that can’t even begin to clean a fermentation vessel properly? If they leave physical items in their tanks accidentally, deity only knows what else is “left.” I think the story is probably something else and worded poorly. At least I hope so.

Draper Brewing

“He has experience at some small-by-most standards breweries including Lost Coast and Mad River, both in Humboldt County, which makes sense since he’s originally from Northern California. Mad River happens to be one of my favorite breweries from that area, so it stands to reason that he has folded some of the tricks he picked up there into his own operation” (350).

Not the way causation, or grammar, works. The last clause follows from the first clause of the first sentence but not from the clause it follows. The author’s liking of Mad River has nothing to do with any of the other clauses. Stackpole’s editors seem to be nodding off once in a while.

Walkabout Brewing Co.

“Nearly as popular is Jabberwocky, perhaps with the implication that each 22-ounce bottle implores you, in its best Lewis Carroll voice, to “drink me” (374).

Wrong character in a completely different work. Easy cultural references and allusions aren’t always good ones. And,, yes, I know that most people won’t get the difference, or care. But literature matters. Literary allusion matters.

Again, this had to be a very tough job and the author has done a fine job with a limited amount of space for each entry on the many, many breweries we have in Oregon. I’m not trying to nitpick by pointing out the above but show that there are some small issues; reasons for which I only rated it 4-stars.

Breweries to Come

[Keep in mind this book was released 1 December 2014; that is, is quite new]

This is a two-page listing of the breweries in the process of becoming operational; that is, in planning and/or outfitting.

Of the two mentioned for Bend, one (North Rim) has been open a while now and at least one other not listed (Monkless Belgian Ales) is also already open.

Also not listed, Craft Kitchen and Brewery is replacing Old Mill Brew Wërks, which is out of business.

Immersion Brewing has been announced.

Redmond’s scene is definitely growing. See the bottom of Jon’s post here for some new ones.

The problem with these sorts of books is that they are out-of-date as soon as they are published. For a place like Oregon even before publication. Remember, release date was not even four months ago.

I would really love to see this sort of thing as a wiki, with accompanying map(s), and various ways to slice and dice the data. Perhaps the Oregon Brewers Guild should do such a thing (just do it well!) and you could get access with SNOB membership. Wouldn’t help out-of-state visitors or the simply inquisitive and not-yet-converted.

Honestly, I just want it open and available. But who will maintain it? A definite early-21st century issue. This is not a dig on Yaeger’s book but on the entire class of book like this. His has superseded, at least partly, two other books. Neither of which is that old. His will be too. Soon.

Anyway, for the most up-to-date listing of Central Oregon breweries (and their order of operation) just look in Jon’s sidebar at the Brew Site.

Again, I think this is a darn fine book of its type. For me it will serve as a reference book (I did purchase a copy after all). I have already used it extensively in making plans for our trip this week to Portland.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge.

This is the 17th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Deschutes Street Pub

Deschutes Street Pub may be coming to a city near you. Well, seven cities after its test run here in Bend May 9th. Between 30 May and 14 Nov it will visit Philadelphia, Arlington, VA, Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Denver and Sacramento.

Deschutes Street Pub logo

“We’re super excited to announce that we’re setting up shop in your town for one day! That’s right, we’re bringing our outdoor pub of epic proportions to each of the cities below for an all out block party. Crafted from reclaimed wood and steel, our Street Pub will be a one-stop-shop to try several of our beers – from the coveted Reserve Series rarities (think The Abyss) all the way to year-round favorites like Black Butte Porter and Mirror Pond Pale Ale. Pair those beers up with culinary creations from our Executive Chef, Jeff Usinowicz, and live local music – and you have a street party that’s truly “crafted for community.”

In each city we’ll partner with a local charity so you’ll be drinking for a good cause. The amount of money raised will be determined by how much beer we sell. So, grab your friends and check out the Street Pub when it rolls through your town.”

A fine companion to Woody but on another level [Woody events]. The Street Pub uses 4296 feet of reclaimed white oak and 10,000 pounds of steel. It has 40 taps, which is quite a bit more than the Bend Pub or the PDX Pub or the brewery. Wow! Other than that—which you can learn from watching the video—there are no details, just a fleeting glimpse.

Let’s just say that they have my attention and I hope to be at the May 9th Bend test run.

Schedule available here.

Deschutes Brewery Blog post, “Street Pub – Crafted for Community.”

Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend

Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, Oregon, on October 15th

What: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, OR
When: October 15th, 6-9pm
Where: Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend
Cost: Pay per pint or per sample

This post covers two events: the hike I went on and the unique tasting event at BTBS on 15 October. See below for more details of the both the tasting event at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café and of the hike.

Middle Deschutes River and Deschutes River Canyon. Beers Made By Walking, Oregon Natural Desert Association, and Deschutes Brewery Hike on 22 May 2014. [Photo courtesy of BMBW.]

Middle Deschutes River and Deschutes River Canyon. Beers Made By Walking, Oregon Natural Desert Association, and Deschutes Brewery Hike on 22 May 2014. That’s me in the brown hat and blue backpack up front. [Photo courtesy of BMBW.]

On 22 May of this year I went on a hike with to the Middle Deschutes River with Deschutes Brewery, Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) and Eric Steen of Beers Made By Walking. We hiked the Scout Camp trail down into the Deschutes River Canyon and saw the confluence of Whychus Creek and the Deschutes River, among other natural beauties.

Confluence of Whychus Creek (on right) and Middle Deschutes (on left) "on the ground," so to speak.

Confluence of Whychus Creek (on right) and Middle Deschutes (on left) “on the ground,” so to speak.
My entire Flickr set here.

More commentary and photos follow the info on the upcoming tasting at Broken Top Bottle Shop.

Beers Made By Walking (BMBW) is a program that invites brewers to go on nature hikes and make new beer inspired by plants that are identified on the trail. Each hike is unique and each beer that is produced is a drinkable landscape portrait of the trail we hiked. On October 15th, from 6-9pm at Broken Top Bottle Shop, beer lovers will have the opportunity to try new beers inspired by hikes around the Bend Region.

These hike-inspired beers were produced through a collaboration between BMBW and the Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) through a series of public hikes with brewers throughout the summer.

Participating local brewers that joined in on the hikes include Crux Fermentation Project, Deschutes Brewery, and Worthy Brewing.

Each brewer will serve their new beer on October 15th. Additionally, Laurelwood Brewing (Portland), and Seven Brides Brewing (Silverton) will also tap special beers based off hikes in their region.

Visitors will have the opportunity to meet the brewers, learn about the various hikes that inspired the beers, and learn about some of ONDA and BMBW’s recent work. Beers will be sold by the pint and in sample sizes until they run out. 100% of the proceeds from this event will benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

What: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, OR
When: October 15th, 6-9pm
Where: Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend
Cost: Pay per pint or per sample

Tap list and details available as of this moment:

Crux River Trail Sour
ABV 9.0. IBU 15. Special ingredients are, choke cherries, and mint. Also fermented with a mixed culture from Crooked Stave out of Colorado. This is a blend of our Saison and a barrel aged golden sour. There is crisp light tartness to it that blends very smoothly with the dry fruity flavors of the saison. There is also a slight pink color from the choke cherries, and a very slight mint flavor in the finish.

Worthy Walk on the Wild Side (Badlands Indigenous Ale).
6.5% ABV. 14 IBUs. Beer brewed with Juniper tips, juniper berries, Indian Rice grass, Desert Sage, wheatgrass, and fescue.

Deschutes Botanic Ale – A light and crisp beer with rye, wild sage, and meadowsweet, rose and Stella hops, inspired by a wildflower hike on the Middle Deschutes River.

Laurelwood Saison de Walkle – Saison with rose hips and elderberries. 5.5%, 12 IBU

Seven Brides Pseudo Tsuga IPA – Light bodied IPA with a piney aroma and resiny flavor from the addition of Douglas Fir needle tea. 5.4%, 60 IBU

I fully intend to be at this tasting and I hope you will be too.

xxxx

Eric Steen (BMBW), left. ONDA tour guide, middle. Veronica Vega (Deschutes), right.

There were a total of six people on the Deschutes hike: Veronica Vega (Deschutes Pub Brewer extraordinaire), Gina Schauland (Deschutes Social Media Coordinator & Event Promotions), our trail guide from ONDA, another young woman, Eric of BMBW, and me.

[Let me go on record and say that I am an ass regarding names. I sincerely apologize to the two young ladies whose names I don’t know. I guarantee you that I remember your faces, and, with any luck, the context from which I recognize you.] [Nikki! (no idea of spelling. The other young lady is Nikki. I think/believe.]

I was going to put about a dozen photos from our hike here but then I realized that there are 100s from the Canon and not just iPhone photos. Instead, I am uploading them and will link there here shortly. All of them. Unretouched.

Still. One more.

This is also the confluence of the Whychus and Deschutes. That spear coming in from the left ... Deschutes to the left, Whychus from the right.

This is also the confluence of the Whychus and Deschutes. That spear coming in from the left … Deschutes to the left, Whychus from the right. You can actually see water from both in this photo also.

I had the Deschutes Botanic Ale on 5 September when late one evening Sara and I wandered into the pub for a nightcap and it was on tap. The pub manager bought us our beer when she heard I had gone on the hike. I do not think it was supposed to be on and may have been so accidentally. Nonetheless, I quite enjoyed it and am looking forward to having it again at 5 or so weeks older. Which is only about difference; not “better.” With botanicals they can change quite rapidly.

I do not know where the rest of the Bend beer geeks were on these hikes; I heard there were low turnouts on the other two hikes also. Anyway, this was an amazing honor along with being an amazing adventure. Ok. I know the rest of you up here do hikes like these for breakfast but this made me work a bit. That’s neither here nor there.

The beauty was everywhere. From the tiny little flora to the grandeur of the rugged, sweeping views capped off by a perfectly blue sky with wispy clouds. Since we carpooled, I rode up to the hike area with Veronica and Gina and gained a little insight into my favorite big brewery. On the way back, Eric joined us and to be privy to the discussion between Veronica and Eric was, indeed, a privilege.

There was discussion of sourcing ingredients, which ingredients were inspiring Veronica and why, when in the process the various botanicals might be used and how, and so on. It was quite fascinating.

If you get a chance to go on a Beers Made By Walking hike do so. Just go.

Deschutes Mirror Mirror 2014 release

Today is release day for Deschutes much-anticipated Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barrel-aged barley wine. It has been 5 years since it was last released. This past Dec 20th I had some of the 2009 Mirror Mirror at a Solstice Barley Wine Night party we had at our place and it was quite tasty so I was definitely looking forward to this release.

Mirror Mirror 2014 Release barley wine at Deschutes Brewery barrel works

Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barley wine at Deschutes Brewery barrel works

The same friend who brought the 2009 Mirror Mirror to our barley wine party, the ever personable Jon Abernathy, invited me as his +1 to an invitation-only media event held yesterday at Deschutes barrel works, celebrating the release of the Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve. We got to chat with founder Gary Fish and barrel master and brewer Ryan [sorry, failed to catch his last name].

Deschutes founder, Gary Fish, and barrel master/brewer Ryan, talking to us about the Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barley wine

Deschutes founder, Gary Fish, and barrel master/brewer Ryan, talking to us about the Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barley wine

They talked about Mirror Mirror, the Reserve Series, the new Pub Reserve Series, the barrel works, upcoming plans for beers, and answered questions while we sampled the new 2014 Mirror Mirror. Next we tried some of the first Pub Reserve Series beer Big Red. And finally we got to try some future Not the Stoic right out of the rye barrel it is aging in. It was a grand time, the beers were all world class, and I learned a lot. Thanks, Deschutes and Jon!

Deschutes Brewery barrel works, cold side

Deschutes Brewery barrel works, cold side

Deschutes Brewery barrel works, warm side for sours and those beauties needing warmer temps of 70 degrees

Deschutes Brewery barrel works, warm side for sours and those beauties needing warmer temps of 70 degrees

Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve Barley Wine was the first of the Deschutes Reserve Series and was previously released in 2005 & 2009. It was “born of a double batch of Mirror Pond Pale Ale, [and] is an inspired barley wine ale layered with intriguing nuances. Explore the latest incarnation and enjoy its delicious complexity in every sip.” It is 11/2% ABV and has 53 IBUs. It is brewed with English malts and Cascade and Millennium hops. Fifty percent was aged for 10 months in oak barrels that once held Oregon Pinot Noir, Tempranillo, and Malbec wines. [All info from the one-sheet they provided.]

Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barley wine

Mirror Mirror 2014 Reserve barley wine

I hope to get about 5-6 bottles of this and sit on them for 6-months, 1 year, 2 years through to 4-5 years. I expect quite delicious things to develop. I suggest you get to one of the pubs and try this fresh on draft and then put aside a bottle or two for at least 6 months. Keep in mind that even Deschutes recommends waiting a year as the bottles have a “Best After” 24 February 2015 date on them. I’m willing to “sacrifice” a bottle at 6-months to see how it is developing but my main interest in this vintage is in the 1 to 5-year-old range.

The Pub Reserve Series was quietly released at the end of last year. These bottles are only available at both of the pubs and the breweries’ tasting room. “It’s no secret that our brewers love to experiment in the pub brewhouses, and this new series celebrates that passion with some never-seen-before, single-batch brews. First up is Big Red, a double Cinder Cone Red, aged in Cabernet and Syrah barrels. The next pub Reserve beer will be Planète Rouge, a blended sour red ale – releasing March 24, 2014.” [All info from the one-sheet they provided.]

The Big Red, an Imperial Red Ale, is shaping up quite nicely already. We had a sample at the Deschutes Pub on 31 December when it was released and picked up a bottle for some light aging. It has a “best by” 1 Dec 2014 date and based on how it has already matured I think I’ll give it another 3-4 months. If you are interested in this you had best grab it soon at either of Deschutes pubs in Bend or Portland or at the tasting room at the brewery.

After they discussed the Pub Reserve Series, I asked Gary and Ryan if the Portland Pub beers would be available at the tasting room. They clarified that these beers are brewed in both pubs, in this case barrel-aged, and then shipped to the brewery where they are blended and then bottled for sale. So they truly are a collaboration between the two pub brewers. I know I need to learn more about the Portland pub brewer but we adore Veronica Vega and her Bend pub beers!

The Not the Stoic will be a barrel-aged, Belgian-style quad, due in April if I remember correctly. It is aging in several different barrels and we got ours straight out of a rye barrel. I hope once it’s blended some of those rye notes remain, along with whatever other intriguing notes they get from the other barrels.

Not the Stoic straight out of the rye barrel

Not the Stoic straight out of the rye barrel

Again, thanks so much Deschutes Brewery and Jon for including me.

Oh yeah. We each got to bring a bottle home.

And as final photo teasers here are some true beauties to salivate over in your dreams while we wait for some future release:

The Abyss Imperial Stout. But is this 2014 or 2015?

The Abyss Imperial Stout. But is this 2014 or 2015?

 

Pub Imperial Bitter sitting in a spanish sherry cask. OMG! Please let me find this at the Bend pub whenever it is released.

Pub Imperial Bitter sitting in a spanish sherry cask. OMG! Please let me find this at the Bend pub whenever it is released.

 

 

McMenamins Black Widow Porter

Short review: Both the Black Widow Porter in 22 oz bottle (via production brewery in Troutdale) and the Old Saint Francis School version from Mike White are darn fine tasty porters. Get yourself some and drink them!

Do it soon as it won’t be available for long!

A few weeks ago I got a bomber of Black Widow Porter along with an embossed pint glass and a sticker from McMenamins via FedEx. On thanking @captainneon on Twitter, he suggested I do a horizontal tasting of it along with our local version. I thought this was a grand idea so I waited until I could get a growler of Mike “Curly” White’s version from McMenamins Old Saint Francis School.

I finally made it over this past Monday where it was also the growler fill of the week so I got it at a little discount. A few hours later I got out four 5 oz. taster glasses, opened the bomber and the growler after letting them warm up about 20 minutes, and poured the wife and I each a glass of both.

McMenamins Black Widow Porter - bomber from Troutdale, pint glass filled from growler, growler of local Old St. Francis School version

McMenamins Black Widow Porter – bomber from Troutdale, pint glass filled from growler, growler of local Old St. Francis School version

Production batch (22 oz. bomber)

Aroma: light chocolate, barest hint of rye, biscuit

Color: Almost black

Taste, etc.: Coffee and the barest hint of rye spiciness also makes it into the flavor [note: there doesn’t seem to be any rye in the recipe]. This is a fairly traditional porter. Almonds brought out more of the chocolate in the finish, and a little Ghirardelli 70% dark chocolate was quite nice with it.

Old St. Francis School batch (growler)

Aroma: Hint of licorice, dark fruit (plum/grape)

Color: Far less head (see carbonation below); more deep mahogany tints among the almost black.

Taste, etc.: Sweeter and fruitier than the bottled version. Slightly boozy in a grape must way. For some reason this was under-carbonated. The growler was sealed well and we drank it just 3-4 hours after filling … so ? This was not a bad beer but it was not what we expected nor was it a traditional porter, by any means.

I then switched to a pint glass for a couple reasons. What does it actually taste like in a more proper serving size? I wanted a picture of the beer in the glass McMenamins sent along with the bottle. This was the local version from the growler though. Aroma was pretty much the same. It had a slightly better mouthfeel (towards style) but was still under-carbonated. Was also still quite fruity along the plum/dark grape spectrum.

The next night I had about half a pint from the growler and it was now a little thinner but far less fruity and less sweet. It tasted a bit more like a traditional porter.

Clearly there seemed to be something wrong with the growler or the beer it was filled with. So Wednesday I went to McMenamins and tried the local version on site by the pint.

Old St. Francis School version at McMenamins

Aroma: Coffee and chocolate

C: Black with a nice dark tan head. I had to verify that it wasn’t on nitro as it was so beautiful looking in the glass with tiny creamy bubbles.

Taste, etc.: Creamy, medium-plus-bodied. Chocolate, hint of coffee, hint of vanilla. Quite tasty!

This was an exquisite traditional porter. Just to verify my perceptions I had a second pint. Yep. Damn fine job, Curly! Thankfully I got a chance to tell him while I was sitting there. We also discussed the growler issue but neither of us came to any real conclusions. I would have stayed and had a third pint—I rarely come across a traditional porter that good and that inexpensive (was happy hour)—but I had to meet the wife.

Bottom line: Curly at McMenamins Old Saint Francis School outdid the production brewery for this year’s batch of Black Widow Porter in a not entirely fair match up. [That is, Curly’s brew got a second chance and I did not taste the Edgefield version at the pub on draft but from a bottle and only in a taster glass.]

Either way, both beers were quite tasty! Thank you, McMenamins.

By the way, this Wednesday at O’Kanes at Old Saint Francis School there will be a firkin of Whiskey Widow tapped at 5 pm as part of O’Kanes Cask Series Release. This is Curly’s version of Black Widow Porter aged on oak spirals soaked in Hogshead Whiskey. Get over there on Wednesday if you are interested. I plan on being there!

Meier and Meier – Brewed in the Pacific Northwest

Brewed in the Pacific Northwest: a history of beer-making in Oregon and WashingtonGary Meier; Fjord Press 1991 (Western Writers Series No. 3)WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder

Read 21 July – 8 August 2013 

Comments:

This book, published in 1991, purports to list all of the licensed breweries in Oregon and Washington from the 1st in 1852 (Portland) to “the present” of 1991. They list 126 breweries in Oregon and 138 in Washington. But I do not know if those numbers take into account the microbreweries of the recent present which are listed in ch. 6, which includes 20 for Oregon and 15 for Washington. There they are all listed alphabetically by name and separated by Oregon and then Washington, unlike the ones in ch. 3 and 4 where the cities are listed alphabetically within their respective states.

The book is more than a simple listing of breweries, though. There are two introductory chapters on the history of beer and on the brewing process and requirements. There is an “interlude” chapter on Prohibition and another on saloons. There is a chapter which focuses solely on “The Big Three”: “Henry Weinhard of Blitz-Weinhard; Andrew Hemrich of Rainier; and Leopold Schmidt of Olympia” (129). The final chapter focuses on the rise of the microbreweries, although it is primarily a listing.

The listings are not simply a name within a city but contain a smattering of data on each brewery, if any was found. They range from the short, through the medium, to the more complete:

Coaledo: “This short-lived coal mining community in the Coos Bay area had a brewery from 1874 to 1875 that was run by Henry Tolle” (40).

Brownsville: “Mr. B. Clomer held a brewery license in this Linn County town in 1878 and 1879, but there is no record that a brewery was built or that any beer was actually made. Perhaps he couldn’t brew up enough support or financing to get going” (36).

Coos Bay (Marshfield, at the time): includes a lengthy listing, compared to the above two, listing several changes of hands of a brewery that existed from 1868 to 1912, along with a very short note about two other breweries (41).

The book includes lots of black & white photos depicting breweries, bottles, advertisements of assorted kinds, and other breweriana.

If you are interested in a bit of history on beer making in Oregon and Washington, with what purports to be a complete listing of licensed breweries up until 1991, then this book is for you.

Contents:

  • Foreword     vii
  • 1 The Universal Beverage     11
  • 2 Copper Kettles and Wooden Barrels      16
  • 3 Brewed in Oregon         30
  • Interlude One: The Infamous 18th Amendment     76
  • 4 Brewed in Washington     82
  • 5 Henry, Andrew, and Leopold: The Big Three     129
  • Interlude Two: “Belly Up to the Bar, Boys”: The Saloons     164
  • 6 In the Old Stye: The Microbreweries     170
  • Glossary     191
  • Source Notes     195
  • Bibliography      197
  • Index     203

My notes:

Foreword

First brewery established in Portland in 1852 (vii).

1: The Universal Beverage

Clearly pop history as no citations for things like: “… and an Assyrian clay tablet relates that beer was taken aboard Noah’s Ark” (11). While I call this “pop history” it is not meant as a denigration. It only means that the book was intended to be sold to people who would be put off by the apparatus of scholarly works. This seems to be a very well researched work that the authors claim took three years to research, and they comment on the sources used in both the foreword and in the source notes [see below]. There is also a bibliography that includes a list of books, newspapers and periodicals.

§ Beer in North America

1st recorded commercial brewery – “established in 1612 by a Dutchman and a Dane, Block and Christiansen, in New Amsterdam (New York).” (13)

§ The Advent of Lager Beer

“Lager beer revolutionized the American brewing industry by offering a lively foaming beer that was more palatable to most people than were the old-style beers.” (15)

2: Copper Kettles and Wooden Barrels

“Commercial brewing in the Pacific Northwest began in 1852, when a German immigrant named Henry Saxer established his Liberty Brewery at the new village called Portland in the Oregon Territory. He missed being the first brewer on the Pacific Coast by three years; that honor went to San Francisco brewer Adam Schuppert in 1849.” (16)

  • #2 1854 – Nicholas Delin in Steilacoom
  • #3 1855 – Emil Meyer in Walla Walla
  • #4 1856 – John Muench in Fort Vancouver
  • #5 1856 – J. J. Holman in Jacksonville
  • #6 1858 – Martin Schmeig in Steilacoom
  • #7 1859 – “Henry Weinhard bought the Muench brewery across the Columbia River from the city that would bring him fame.” (16)

Local hops and barley cultivation from around 1865. Shipped from San Francisco previously (16-17).

Book covers 138 breweries in Washington and 126 in Oregon (19 and earlier). [But see above count as I don’t know if this number reflects the microbreweries in ch. 6.]

§ How the Brewer Made His Beer

§ Pails, Kegs, and Bottles

Picture on p. 23 of a few of the 333 types of beer bottle stoppers patented in the US between 1880 and 1890. [333 in a decade!]

§ The Never-Ending Need for Ice, Ice, Ice!

§ Tall Windows and Stately Walls: Brewery Architecture

3: Brewed in Oregon

“Oregon has had 126 licensed breweries from 1852 to the present [1991].” (30)

This was across 53 cities, if not including the microbreweries from ch. 6.

Interlude One: The Infamous 18th Amendment

“By the time the 18th Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution, effective January 16, 1920, Oregon and Washington had already been “dry” for four years by popular vote.” (76)

“Local option law” put in effect in Oregon in 1904 and in Washington in 1909, and some counties went dry (77).

“Home rule” laws made even more confusing – cities could make their own decision and be opposite of their county (77).

Nov 3, 1914 the “drys” won in both OR and WA “one chief factor in that surprising outcome was the vote of women, who had gained the voting rights two years before. It is estimated that three out of four of every women who voted chose prohibition” (78).

“Appropriate amendments were drafted into the states’ constitutions, and prohibition arrived in Oregon and Washington on January 1, 1916” (78).

I find that many people in the Pacific Northwest seem to be either unaware of this or perhaps they simply ignore it. But I fail to see how one can discuss Prohibition in the PNW and ignore this. Oregon and Washington were fully dry four years before national Prohibition and parts of each were dry for sixteen and eleven years, respectively. I had known about the start of Prohibition in 1916 for Oregon but I did not know about Washington or the earlier period of ridiculous complexity surrounding alcohol in Oregon and Washington until reading this book.

§ National Prohibition

4 Brewed in Washington

138 breweries, “since 1854, when Nicholas Delin first started making beer in Steilacoom. Two of the original breweries are still in operation, and a number of new smaller ones are producing beer for a loyal following” (82).

  • Spokane  – “… many breweries over the years, all of them now gone, except for two recent microbreweries that carry on the tradition” (104).
  • Vancouver – 1935, five men formed Great Western Malting Co.; three well-known brewers – Arnold Blitz of Blitz-Weinhard, Peter Schmidt of Olympia Brewing, Emil Sicks of Sicks’ Rainier Brewing Co., and Bill Einzig, manager; Morgan Kellett, operator. (123)

This was also across 53 cities, if not including the microbreweries from ch. 6.

5 Henry, Andrew, and Leopold: The Big Three

“Three of these historic beer plants, established long ago by their pioneer founders, are with us still, and they have grown to become the largest brewing operations in the Pacific Northwest, and among the largest in the country. We see their names daily as familiar memorials to the three old-time German brewers who created them: Henry Weinhard of Blitz-Weinhard; Andrew Hemrich of Rainier; and Leopold Schmidt of Olympia” (129).

§ Henry Weinhard and the Blitz-Weinhard Story

“In 1863 Henry Weinhard bought property away from the center of town, with only a single road into the place, and here he built his new brewery. It was on the same site where Blitz-Weinhard stands today. He called his new enterprise the City Brewery, …” (133).

In 1882 he replaced the wooden buildings with “what Oregon historian H. K. Hines called ‘an immense pile of brick, which covers the entire block,’ at what is now 12th and West Burnside.” It went from 11th to 13th St; the bottling plant was across the street on Couch St; stables for beer-wagon horses on 13th; large warehouse at steamboat docks (134).

Great philanthropist (134-6).

1890 – Output of 40k barrels/yr. Pacific Coast, Western states and territories, Portland (of course) and China, Japan, the Philippines, and Siberia (136).

Good employer (136-7).

Survived Prohibition by making soft drinks, fruit drinks, syrups, flavorings, toppings, and a malt extract for cooking (138).

Merged with the Portland Brewing Company of Arnold Blitz in late 1927 to become Blitz-Weinhard (138-9).

“After 1953, when Sicks’ Brewing Co. closed its Salem plant, Blitz-Weinhard was the only brewery in Oregon” (140).

“In 1977 Blitz-Weinhard was America’s fifteenth-oldest brewery. But the year 1979 marked the end to one of the last independent breweries. On January 31 of that year the Oregonian announced the sale of Blitz-Weinhard to Milwaukee’s oldest brewery, the Pabst Brewing Company, founded in 1844. …” (141).

Bought by G. Heileman Brewing of La Crosse, WI in 1983, which was bought by an Australian company, Bond Corp. Holdings, Ltd. in 1988 (141).

“Now” employs 350 people and brews 1.2M barrels/year (141).

§ Andrew Hemrich and His “Rainier Beer”

“The site at 3100 Airport Way South [was Ninth Ave. S.] is now the home of the modern Rainier Brewing Company” (photo caption, 144).

Sold the Rainier label to a San Francisco brewery when state Prohibition came in 1916 (146/147).

Sicks’ Seattle Brewing & Malting Co had bought back the Rainier label in 1938 (149).

Since the mid-50s the majority stockholder was Molson Breweries, Ltd. Sold by Molson to G. Heileman in 1977. Heileman bought by Australian company [see B-W above] in 1987 (150).

“Rainier Brewing Co. employs about 550 people, …” (150).

“The former pre-Prohibition Seattle Brewing & Malting Co. buildings in Georgetown at 6004 Airport Way South are worth a look too. (151). [Although I seriously doubt they still stand empty today.]

§ Leopold Schmidt of Olympia—”It’s the Water”

Interlude Two: “Belly Up to the Bar, Boys”: The Saloons

“Hollywood Westerns notwithstanding, much more beer than whiskey was downed in saloons. Except for certain arid regions of the Southwest, where it was impractical to import beer from distant breweries, kegs and bottles of ice-cooled beer were an integral part of the barroom inventory” (164).

“Before Prohibition, the saloon was strictly a male stronghold” (165).

§ The Tradition of the “Free Lunch”

Had to buy a beer first; foods were usually spicy and salty to bring on thirst (168).

6 In the Old Style: The Microbreweries

“These are the present Pacific Northwest microbreweries. Any or all are worth a visit.” (171).

Keep in mind that these are supposedly current up until some point in 1991. I would be interested if anyone knew of any missing breweries. Also, there is more information on each of these in the book.

Oregon Microbreweries

  • Bay Front Brewery & Public House – Newport; Opened July 1989 – companion to Rogue Brewery in Ashland
  • Bridgeport Brewing Company – Portland; 1984, Oregon’s oldest operating micro (171)
  • Cornelius Pass Roadhouse – Hillsboro; 1986, a McMenamin brewery (172)
  • Deschutes Brewery & Public House – Bend; 1988
  • Fulton Pub & Brewery – Portland; May 1988, a McMenamin brewery (173)
  • Highland Pub & Brewery – Gresham; June 1988, a McMenamin brewery
  • High Street Brewery & Cafe – Eugene; Nov 1988, a McMenamin brewery (174)
  • Hillsdale Brewery & Public House – Portland; First in the McMenamin chain; “As of April 1990, the McMenamins have opened seven other brewpubs in Oregon” (174).
  • Hood River Brewing Company – Hood River; fall 1988 (174-5)
  • Lighthouse BrewPub – Lincoln City; July 1986, a McMenamin brewery (175)
  • McMenamins – Beaverton; April 1990, a McMenamin brewery (176)
  • Oregon Trail Brewery – Corvallis; July 1987; Willamette Valley’s oldest brewery (176)
  • The Pizza Deli & Brewery – Cave Junction; July 1990
  • Portland Brewing Company – Portland; Jan 1986 (177)
  • Roger’s Zoo – North Bend; Jan 1987 (178)
  • Rogue Brewery & Public House – Ashland; 1988
  • Steelhead Brewery – Eugene; Jan 1991 (179)
  • Thompson’s Brewery & Public House – Salem; Jan 1990, a McMenamin brewery (180)
  • Widmer Brewing Company – Portland; 1985
  • Widmer Brewing Company – Portland; ” expanded in August 1990 to the second location” (180)

Washington Microbreweries

  • Big Time Brewing Company – Seattle; 1 Dec 1988 (181)
  • Duwamps Cafe & Seattle Brewing Company – Seattle; Nov 1990
  • Fort Spokane Brewery – Spokane; July 1989 (182)
  • Hale’s Ales – Spokane; “First established in Colville in the winter of 1983 …. The brewery was moved to Spokane in September 1991” (182).
  • Hale’s Ales – Kirkland; 2nd brewery, early 1987 (182-3)
  • Hart Brewing – Kalama; 1984 (Pyramid( (183)
  • Maritime Pacific Brewing Company – Seattle; Sep 1990 (184)
  • Noggins Brewery and Restaurant – Seattle; 20 Oct 1988
  • The Pacific Northwest Brewing Company – Seattle; May 1989 (184-5)
  • Pike Place Brewery – Seattle; Oct 1989 (185)
  • Redhook Ale Brewery – Seattle; 1982 (185-6)
  • Roslyn Brewing Company – Roslyn; May 1990 (186)
  • Thomas Kemper Brewery – Poulsbo; Jan 1985 (187)
  • Yakima Brewing & Malting Company – Yakima; July 1982 (188)

Glossary

Source Notes

Some general books on beer were helpful (195).

“The information on specific breweries came chiefly from primary sources, such as: historical records of the United States Brewers’ Association; contemporary newspaper accounts; business directories; county and state records; and the myriad of letters, documents, reminiscences, and advertisements concerning old-time local breweries in the archives of the 54 county and regional historical societies” (195).

State and local histories and profiles of noteworthy residents (195).

Bibliography

This book is definitely worth a look. After reading a hardback copy that I got from OSU Valley Library (TP 573 .U5 M45 1991) I purchased a used paperback copy (ISBN: 0940242532).