McMenamins beer in cans taste-off

As I wrote in my post, “Received: McMenamins cans are here!,” that I would, I did a taste-off between the canned versions of Ruby and Hammerhead from the Edgefield production brewery and those from my local McMenamins Old Saint Francis School brewer, Mike “Curly” White. On the 23rd of August I stopped by OSF and got a growlette (32 oz glass “bottle”) of each.

Picture of coozie, two 16 oz cans of McMenamins beer, a postcard, and a small ornament of Ruby.

On 24 August I compared the two Hammerheads and on 25 August I compared the two Rubys. [First 2 under this link]

Hammerhead Taste-off

“Hammerhead McMenamins Hammerhead label

A classic Northwest Pale Ale and McMenamins Standard. This rich chestnut colored gem is a model of harmony between hops and malted barley. Hammerhead’s signature Cascade Hop nose and intense hopped flavor blend nicely with the caramel tones from the Crystal Malt. This beer has a vocal following; to run out is an unforgivable sin.

Malts: Premium 2-Row, Bairds Crystal 70/80

Hops: Cascade

Original Gravity: 1.056

Terminal Gravity: 1.010

Alcohol by Volume: 6.0%

Calories: 241 per pint”

McMenamins Hammerhead can, 2 snifter glasses and a growler

McMenamins Hammerhead taste-off: Can on left, OSF on right

Old Saint Francis School Hammerhead

Aroma: lightly floral and light melon; caramel and toasted bread crumb.

Color: Slightly opaque golden orange. Light tan head of extra fine bubbles and a couple small fisheyes; decent persistence.

Flavor: “English.” Soft. Fairly complex malt of bread, toast and light caramel for a pale ale. Medium hop flavor which was lightly floral and very light citrus. Medium bitterness.

Mouthfeel: Light chalkiness in finish; finishes semi-dry and then dries out a bit more.

Edgefield Hammerhead

Aroma: very light cattiness when cold; disappeared but then came back, so fleeting cattiness. After warming some: very light tobacco/ashtray and a very light dankness.

Color: Almost clear medium-dark orange. Light tan head of extra fine bubbles and a couple small fisheyes; decent persistence [same head as OSF].

Flavor: almost smoky. Medium hop flavor of very light citrus, pine and some earthiness. Medium bitterness.

Mouthfeel: creamier. Slightly more attenuated. Finishes semi-dry.

More “polished” overall but I think the scales [for me, in this instance] tip to Curly’s version. I like the chalkiness and the malt was more complex. His also did not have some of the odder aromas coming from the canned version.

Ruby Taste-off

“Ruby McMenamins Ruby label

One of our most popular standards, we still make Ruby with the same aims we had when brewing the first batch back in March of 1986: To create an ale light, crisp and refreshingly fruity. Great Western Premium 2-Row and 42 pounds of Oregon-grown and processed raspberry puree is used to craft every colorful batch. Simple but delicious.

Malts: Premium 2-row, Maltodextrin

Hops: Chinook

Fruit: Raspberry

Original Gravity: 1.039

Terminal Gravity: 1.005

Alcohol by Volume: 4.0%

Calories: 170 per pint”

McMenamins Ruby can, 2 snifter glasses and a growler

McMenamins Ruby taste-off: Can on left, OSF on right

Old Saint Francis School Ruby

Aroma: high fresh raspberry. Lightly bready malt almost hidden under the fruit. No discernible hop aroma. Light corn as warms. Once warm got some ashtray on intake.

Color: opaque pink grapefruit with a just off-white head of extra fine bubbles and varied fisheyes and medium persistence.

Flavor: Light corn with a light corn slickness. Raspberry present more in finish than across palate but still low.

Mouthfeel: Medium-bodied. Finishes medium-dry with a medium-low hp bitterness but no discernible hop flavor. Softer than the canned version.

Edgefield Ruby

Aroma: raspberry but more artificial. Very light bread crust. Very light corn in inhale just before sipping.

Color: much clearer than OSF version; almost clear orange-peach with the same head as OSF version.

Flavor: Almost raspberry up front and then a lot in the back.

Mouthfeel: Slightly less body than OSF version. Finishes in middle: kind of semi-dry and semi-sweet at same time.

Raspberry is not my favorite ingredient in beer but I preferred Curly’s version with its much fresher-seeming raspberry aroma and a bit less raspberry flavor. Again, the OSF version was also missing the weird (mostly) phenolic aroma showing up. Those can be fine in an imperial stout, barleywine, old ale, etc. but not in these styles of beer. All in all, it was fairly close but not as close at the Hammerheads were.

After I was done making my notes on the individual Rubys I combined them in a 50/50 mix. The aroma was closer to be fresh raspberry (OSF) than artificial raspberry (can). Color and clarity were in between, of course, and the head was much longer lasting than either version alone (although the mix did get a slightly more vigorous pour). It also had a softer mouthfeel than either. For me, it was the best of both worlds.

Wrap-up

These cans are gorgeous, although I am a bit biased as I adore McMenamins in-house art style. I would say it is fairly close still between Edgefield and Curly here in Bend, although I think Curly’s still got a slight edge where my taste buds are concerned. I do not pretend this is any sort of objective standard or measure. ‘Tis just me.

Thanks again, McMenamins for sending me these beauties!

[Disclaimer: These beers came to me free and unbidden [but appreciated] from McMenamins.]

The role of beer books (The Session #115)

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

This month’s Session is hosted by Blog Birraire (Joan Birraire in Barcelona) and is on “the role of beer books.

“The discussion at hand is “The Role of Beer Books”. Participants can talk about that first book that caught their attention, which brought them to get interested in beer; or maybe about books that helped developing their local beer scene. There’s also the -bad- role of books that regrettably misinform readers because their authors did not do their work properly. There are many different ways to tackle this topic.

The Session has been about books before just once, and it was about those that hadn’t already been written. I believe that their importance for the beer culture makes books worthy for another Session. To participate in the current Session just write a comment down here with a link to the article on -or before- September 2nd, so that I can include it on my Round Up.”

05 September 2016: Update posted below

Being me and being about books this is long and perhaps even rambling. Sue me. I’m a reader, a librarian and a cataloger.

The short version: the role of beer books is education to entertainment, and hopefully a bit of both at the same time, along with any other roles between or on other, orthogonal axes that people may have for any particular book in a time and a place.

First beer books

I doubt that it was my first “beer book,” as I had been collecting beer cans since the age of 12, but I received a copy of Michael Jackson’s The World Guide to Beer, 1st US ed. for Christmas 1978. As I was a 19-year-old US soldier stationed in then West Germany, this is the book that first opened my eyes more fully to the world of beer, as it did for many, many others.

Prior to that I was given a copy of Will Anderson’s, The Beer Book; an Illustrated Guide to American Breweriana, 1st US ed. by my parents for my 16th birthday (1975). Somewhere in and around here I also got copies of The Beer Cans of Anheuser-Busch: an Illustrated History (©1978 so one of my earliest “beer books”) and The Class Book of U.S. Beer Cans (©1982), both new. Somewhere in there I also acquired a copy of The International Book of Beer Can Collecting (©1977).

Of course I read all of these books, some, in particular Jackson’s World Guide, several times.

More Recently

For a long time my interest in reading about beer waned as did my can collecting. I am simply ecstatic that I never got rid of any of my early beer books, unlike many other books over the years or like the vast majority of my can collection that was actively worked on for almost two decades. Too many moves. Too many dollars spent on storage. Most of the cans had gone long before we moved to Oregon, although most were shed over a ~20 year period.

Books Owned

More recently since moving to Bend, Oregon my interest in all aspects of beer has been rekindled. According to LibraryThing—which until now has served as my personal catalog—I own 87 books having something to do with beer or brewing, plus there are a couple that aren’t in as they need manual cataloging and I haven’t yet.

Books Read

My Goodreads account has 118 books on my beer shelf. Bouncing that off of the read shelf I show 74 as read, 1 skimmed, 1 gave up on (had a better version), 1 on pause, and 3 currently being read. Many of those would have come from assorted libraries, both public and academic.

My beer blog

My blog is named “By the barrel; or, the Bend Beer Librarian.” Sadly, I have done a poor job at reviewing all of these books. There are many reasons for that, only a few of which are actually good/legit ones. I always strive to do better although I see seven beer books waiting for reviews on my review-these-damned-books-already (physical) shelf next to my desk. There are of course many more that aren’t sitting here needing reviews. Some of those currently waiting are:

  • Alworth – The Beer Bible
  • Acitelli – The Audacity of Hops
  • Zainasheff & Palmer – Brewing Classic Styles
  • Papazian – The Complete Joy of Homebrewing, 4th ed.
  • Amato – Beerology
  • Dave Miller’s Homebrewing Guide
  • Herz and Conley – Beer Pairing

Others waiting to be reviewed, not directly related to beer but of immense overlap and interest possibly, include:

  • Halloran – The New Bread Basket
  • McQuaid – Tasty

Of course, these are just those books still to hand. ::sigh::

The Role of Beer Books

So what do I consider the “role of beer books”? I may not be much of a reference librarian—my specialty is elsewhere—but as a reader (and a cataloger) that “role” is completely dependent upon the context(s) brought to bear by the reader and cannot really be given much in the way of an answer unless that context is included.

Education

Education is the simple and most relevant generic (and specific) answer. As you can see from just the above list, my personal beer book-enabled education covers a lot of ground from brewing to the history of craft beer to style knowledge to beer and food pairing to almost encyclopedic works and on from there to the revival of craft grain/malt production to the science of taste.

Early spring this year I went on a book buying binge to ensure I had most of the books in the BJCP Judge Certification Program “BJCP Beer Exam Study Guide” [see pg. 3-4] as I was involved in a 12-week tasting exam prep class and hoping to take the tasting exam [I did manage to take it on 23 July and now get to spend a few agonizing months waiting on my score]. I already had quite a few of the books listed but I got almost all of the others, except for the individual style books in the Classic Beer Styles Series from Brewers Publications I didn’t already own.

To backup, my very first beer books were books about beer can collecting and were for both education (history, production) and to see far more of the variety of what was out there (can porn) than I could encounter in my Midwest home town and surrounding environs. Will Anderson’s book is more generally about breweriana and so helped broaden my education beyond cans.

Michael Jackson’s book was given to me just a few months after I had arrived in Europe for my first tour of duty. I knew styles existed, of course, but this book was a real eye opener.

Nowadays my interests are far broader and I have a massive amount to learn! I want to be a competent and confident beer judge. I want to brew beers well that Sara and I like, along with understanding their historical and current cultural contexts. I want to be solid at beer and food pairing. I want to understand how we got to where we are culturally via archaeology, anthropology, ethnology and so on (across cultures). I want to understand as much of the science of brewing as I can. I want to enjoy what I read, at least some of the time. I could probably elucidate many other reasons for a desire to learn about beer and to be entertained by beer writers.

On Bend, Central Oregon and Oregon beer

If you are interested in the beer, breweries, and history of Bend, Central Oregon and Oregon then I highly recommend the following:

  • Jon Abernathy – Bend Beer: A History of Brewing in Central Oregon
  • Brian Yaeger – Oregon Breweries
  • Logan Thompson – Beer Lover’s Oregon: Best Breweries, Brewpubs & Beer Bars

For the larger region but covering Oregon also are:

  • Lisa M. Morrison – Craft Beers of the Pacific Northwest: A Beer Lover’s Guide to Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia
  • Gary and Gloria Meier – Brewed in the Pacific Northwest: A History of Beer Making in Oregon and Washington

All of these books are a bit dated; some more than others. They are either primarily history (Abernathy & the Meiers) or Regional guidebooks (the rest; and the most dated).

“Beer books” is a non-category

I think beer books is too broad a “category” to consider as a whole; as in it isn’t really a category, far too amorphous. In 2013, I gave a talk on beer books during Central Oregon Beer Week and this is how I broke down what I talked about:

Those I addressed:

  • General
  • Beer porn
  • Reference
  • Beer business
  • Historical
  • Breweriana
  • Trivia
  • Regional Guidebooks

Those I did not:

  • Homebrewing
  • Brewing science

No doubt other categories could be named as no doubt some of these could be split further.

The role of a regional guidebook is generally going to be much different than a book of beer porn or one on the business of beer or one on brewing science and so forth. A book of beer can porn serves one role to a collector and another to a student of mid- to late-20th century commercial art.

Conclusion; or, a return

Thus, I am going to say that the role of beer books is education to entertainment, and hopefully a bit of both at the same time, along with any other roles between or on other, orthogonal axes that people may have for any particular book in a time and a place (context).

Update

I have received a few comments regarding the Brewers Publications Classic Styles series. I believe that I could have been a bit clearer in places in my post but let me offer some comments to take or leave as you please.

I believe that the only books I explicitly recommended were under the heading ON BEND, CENTRAL OREGON AND OREGON BEER. All of those are technically historical documents at this point; one always was and a second mostly was. But the first four are still close enough to the present to be useful even if lots of newer breweries are left out. Any other book(s) mentioned I meant to neither recommend nor not; many I would but that was not my point. I was attempting to discuss the role of books from my perspective and not which were good or bad. Perhaps I should have had a small section on the use/role of books that have bad or contested information. That would include pretty much every beer-related book ever written to some extent. The reason I mentioned the Classic Styles series was in the context of acquiring the recommended books to study for the BJCP exams. Clearly I did not believe that those style guides were necessary for my studying.

I am aware that there are some definite issues with the Classic Styles series books. I do not have enough brewing chops to provide much useful critique though, except in the rarest of circumstances and that would still be based on book learning. I do know that some of the “history” is definite bunk. I also realize that they still sell. I have even picked up a couple—all used—as primarily archival documents, if you will. Not necessarily to learn how brew the styles, nor to believe everything written in them—I do that with no book; do you?—but to take them as an artifact of a time and a place.

I do my best not to slog products here—especially those creative endeavors of one or two authors—but rather avoid them or discuss them in a context that hopefully doesn’t entail recommending them. Others far better qualified have addressed the deficiencies on the individual Classic Styles titles and I leave it to them.

I have read several books—some of them fairly new—by big names in the beer world and I thought them either not at all worth the paper they were printed on; there are more older books that fit in that category, thankfully. I gave them a low rating in Goodreads and moved on without writing a review. I do not believe in the “If you don’t have something nice to say …” school of thought but I also see little reason to be an ass for the fun of it. I get excitable enough, which turns me into something of an ass on occasion, that I do not need to pursue it as hobby.

Besides, I have too many outstanding reviews still to be written for books that I do want to recommend to bother writing reviews for ones I find lacking.

I apologize if I failed to pull apart some of these issues but they did not seem particularly pertinent to me in my thinking on the role of beer books at the time I was writing my post. That does not mean they couldn’t have, and maybe should have been, included; or, I could have been clearer about what I was recommending and what I was not. But that was also not my point.

My point is that use of any particular book is up to the individual reader. And while we may or may not be privy to the specific failings of any given book, that too is a part of the context that we need to attempt to bring to it, even before reading sometimes. That is often difficult after reading it. Makes life a little less uncertain to say the least but you should regard pretty much all of your knowledge as potentially fallible and kept open to actual experience anyway.

To decide if a given book is relevant to your own purpose(s) is a critical, complex, and, yes, often fraught undertaking.

That was an awful lot of words to say that “mentions do not imply endorsement.”

Received: McMenamins cans are here!

Picture of coozie, two 16 oz cans of McMenamins beer, a postcard, and a small ornament of Ruby.

Friday I received a package from McMenamins which included their new 16 ounce cans of Hammerhead (NW pale) and Ruby (raspberry ale), along with a Hammerhead coozie, a postcard and a small hanging ornament of Ruby.

How did they know I still collect cans? Had to get rid of so many over the years and after so many moves. I have very few of my old collection left which I started 45 years ago when I was 12. Nowadays, for now, I am keeping one can of every canned beer I have. And, yes, most are packed away from view. Again. And. Still. ::sigh::

I am hoping to get growlettes of both of these beers brewed by our own local brewer, Mike “Curly” White, at Old Saint Francis School to compare and contrast each one to the Edgefield-brewed cans. I have done that in the past when McMenamins has sent me bottles of seasonal releases. I a very lazy blogger and that is a very tad bit of work but it seems worth it and a slightly different angle to me so I like it. So far I believe Curly is ahead on my preferences but I know there was a time or two Edgefield’s bottled versions won out. Always close and always interesting.

According to the postcard, they are available at all 54 McMenamins locations across Oregon and Washington, and are $2.75 each or $10/4-pack. That’s a pretty nice price for 16 oz cans.

Reviews/comparison coming soon I hope.

Beer midlife crisis (The Session #111)

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

From Oliver Gray at Literature and Libation who is hosting this month’s Session on Surviving a Beer Midlife Crisis:

I think that’s true about a lot of bloggers and beer writers. Some may work directly for breweries or distributors or behind the till in a beer store, but a lot of us toil in vocational worlds apart, spending our free time and free dollars on what can only (by definition) be called a “hobby.”

Recently, I’ve found my interest in said hobby waning. The brilliant luster of new beers and new breweries looks now, a few pounds heavier and a bunch of dollars lighter, more like dull aluminum oxide.

The thing I have embraced so fully and spent so much time getting to know and love, suddenly seems generally, unequivocally: meh. It’s like I’ve been living a lie, and everything I’ve done is for not. I’m having a beer mid-life crisis, yo.

Maybe it’s the politics of purchasing or selling. Maybe the subculture has peaked. Maybe this is the natural progression of a hobby that has no real tie to the industry behind it.

Maybe I’m way off the mark, and this whole thing is just a figment of my imagination.

But I’m willing to bet it’s not. All that talk of beer bubbles might prove true, but instead of a dramatic *pop* we’ll might see a slow deflation followed by a farting noise as some of the air leaks out and the hobbyist move on the spend their time and dollars elsewhere. It’s impossible to see the future, but if my fall from rabid beer fanboy to dude-who-drinks-beer-and-sort-of-wants-to-be-left-alone is indicative of a trend, I’ve got some signs to make a doomsaying to do.

What say you?

This topic really spoke to me when I first saw it shortly after it was announced.

I have been feeling something is ‘off’ in my beer drinking and the culture around that for a while now. One might say something has been troubling me but I had no real idea what that was.

I reread the prompt before heading out on a road trip to a beer fest last weekend and just let it gestate way in the back somewhere. I read it again Monday morning so I could do the same on a shorter timeframe as I was heading out to do some weeding. All of a sudden I was writing down some good thoughts before I even got out the door.

A large part of my problem has been, and still is, a matter of reconciling what I want my beer drinking world to look like and what it actually does; limited storage, limited funds, very few occasions our drinking friends and us can get together, and other real world (and, admittedly, first world) problems. Major improvements have been made in attitude and some expectations have been adjusted, yet some of the core issues remain, especially limited time to drink with friends (and we all have a lot of beer that needs drank). Nonetheless, some peace has been made.

Still. Some things are nibbling at the back of my mind. Perhaps I have identified one of them. Here’s my current thoughts on my beerlife crisis, with a bit of a setup.

Since August 2012 I have lived in a beer heaven, Bend, Oregon. There is almost too much availability; certainly more than enough choice. Except for the large number of things not distributed here; including lots of other Oregon beer. 😉

I live in a town of 80,000+ and we have over 20 breweries with a total of 28 in the immediate Central Oregon region, with more on the way. I can not think about most of them on a routine basis and just mainly concentrate on the top five or six that I prefer. Life is that good here [see sidebar of Jon’s blog for a list]. I am not trying to brag but to simply express how freaking blessed we are here.

I started using Untappd on moving here. I currently have 2169 unique check-ins. Once I hit 2500 I’m not sure I’ll continue using it to track them. I may though as it the best, at-hand, tool I have to see if I had a beer previously and what I thought of it. That is a big part of trying to engineer my tasting experience towards only drinking better-than-average beers.

Besides the above issues, which seem perennial, I have come to realize that the issue  is that I’m pretty much over tasting different beers simply for their own sake, and perhaps seeing that number of ‘uniques’ go up. And now, while I’m still happy with a very wide variety of beers, new or not, I want good all of the time; my definition of “good,” not yours. 😉 I don’t want just different. That was never a major motivator but it certainly did play a role for a while.

Button from 20th Annual Legendary Boonville Beer Festival

Button from the 20th Annual Legendary Booneville Beer Festival

As I mentioned, I went to a beer fest last weekend, the 20th Annual Legendary Boonville Beer Festival put on by Anderson Valley Brewing Co. I went for the adventure and because I love some of Anderson Valley’s stuff and at the brewery I could get mostly stuff I haven’t had as it is not distributed, or certainly not up here. But that’s not enough anymore for my limited time and travel/fest budget and there are still several other fests we would love to attend.

Anderson Valley Brewing Company taplist

Anderson Valley Brewing Company taplist

03Tent

Home for my friend and me for two nights. [Windy when I took this photo.]

06FirePit

Someone’s extremely cool beer fire pit during an evening camp walkabout, which we did both Friday and Saturday evenings. Bahl hornin’!

08CampMtn

A small part of camp and the surrounding mountains.

09Fest

One small corner of the fest.

There were lots of beers, scores from breweries I had never even heard of. But it was almost all normal production/“standard” beer. Some were tasty; few needed to be poured out. But mostly meh. I did, though, drink several exquisite beers back at camp with the other five guys I was with.

Firestone Walker Anniversary XIII-XVI. Filled a big space in my love of FW anniversaries. [Friday]

Firestone Walker Anniversary XIII-XVI. Filled a big space in my love of FW anniversaries. [Friday]

Three amazing New Glarus fruit beers. Simply incredible! [Friday]

Three amazing New Glarus fruit beers. Simply incredible! [Friday]

The Rare Barrel No Salt [Saturday]

The Rare Barrel No Salt [Saturday]

Libertine Pepe Le Pluot [Saturday]

Libertine Pepe Le Pluot [Saturday]

12Libertine2

The back side of the Libertine. An absolutely gorgeous presentation on both sides. [Saturday]

13FarmhouseNoir

Sante Adairius Rustic Ales Farmhouse Noir (Batch 3) [Saturday]

Our own Bend Brewfest has been like that for me since our second year here. Just an awful lot of decent stuff. Meh. I am very glad that I went to Boonville, though. Despite the mostly mediocre quality of beer at the fest—that was only four hours—there were excellent beers and people throughout the weekend. And I got to see large parts of my country that I had never seen. So beer fests are fraught in their own way but we will continue to be selective as we refine what we want out of them.

Mt. Shasta

Mt. Shasta, California

Redwoods

Redwoods

Map of a small portion of our trip

Map of a small portion of our trip

Northern California coast

Northern California coast

Paul Bunyan and Babe and his big blues ... Oh. Wait.

Paul Bunyan and Babe and his big blues … Oh. Wait.At Trees of Mystery, Klamath, California

On the flip-side of any ‘crisis,’ I am extremely excited about new hop profiles that are emerging, whether based on new hops or on brewers learning to use hops differently than the recent past where it was mostly about bittering. I am here referring to mostly hop-forward beers like pale ales, IPAs, etc. But then, some of these hops and associated techniques can probably help create some amazing hop profiles in many non-hop-forward beers too. This is probably the thing I am most excited about in the beer world right now.

Thee beer world is all business and that can take its toll sometimes. Then again, so can movements. I am going to drink mostly local and mostly craft but you better believe I bought a 6-pack of 10 Barrel Cucumber Crush in cans because I could. I might never buy one again but I couldn’t let the absurdity of the availably of that beer in that way pass me by. I may well, though, buy it a can at a time in the future [six was too many to keep fresh]. The wife absolutely loves, and I appreciate, Goose Island Bourbon County beers and we will drink some of those in the future, especially as we have a fair few in our cellars.

The main point is my beer world is still evolving, as it has since I took my first sip four decades plus ago, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Not everything is perfect but I am working to accept some things that simply are, and to shift focus and priorities in other directions to keep me interested.

Whether or not I have something like BJCP certification to work towards I will continue to read about beer history, the making of beer, the consumption and packaging of beer, and so on. I am also beginning to home brew; ok, still collecting equipment and I need to help my friends more often but that’s about as fraught an issue as getting together to drink so …. I certainly hope to be brewing by late summer here. Still need to acquire a few pieces and get my kettle modified.

To wrap up this rambling: things are evolving as they always have, I have amazing beer close at hand, I am beginning to brew myself, attitudes are being adjusted, realities are being accepted, I see emerging trends in beers that I am excited about, and, most importantly, I am still learning. I ain’t got no stinkin’ crisis.

Taste the High Desert: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend

The culmination of Beers Made By Walking Bend 2015 is upon us. On 16 September 2015 at Broken Top Bottle Shop 6-9 pm, the beers inspired by this year’s hikes with Crux, Worthy, and Deschutes will be on tap. I hope to see you there!

BEND-BMBW-POSTER

Wow! It looks like my last post, which was back in May, was announcing these hikes. I did manage to go on all three of them and had a wonderful time in some beautiful regions of Central Oregon. I guess I best get a post written on them along with some pictures. [I have really been slacking but then I am having some health issues.]

I want to sincerely thank Beers Made By Walking, the Oregon Natural Desert Association, and the three breweries for doing these hikes. I also want to thank my good friends at Broken Top Bottle Shop for again hosting this tasting and fundraiser for ONDA.

Below is the press release on this event:

Join Beers Made By Walking (BMBW), the Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA), and some of Bend’s best local breweries, to sample unique, new beers inspired by Oregon’s high desert.  September 16th from 6-9pm at the Broken Top Bottle Shop meet the brewers, taste three hike inspired beers, and learn about the awe-inspiring landscapes ONDA works to protect.

Early this summer, Beers Made By Walking (BMBW) invited local brewers to go on nature hikes and create new beers inspired by the plants identified on the trails. This season, BMBW collaborated with the Oregon Natural Desert Association to host three public hikes. ONDA experts led brewers from Crux Fermentation Project, Deschutes Brewery, and Worthy Brewing Co. through current and proposed wilderness areas and including the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, Scout Camp at the confluence of the Deschutes River and Whychus Creek, and Black Canyon at Sutton Mountain. The beers that come out of this collaboration are inspired by the surrounding high-desert.

For the event Worthy Brewing brewed “Walk on the Wild Side,” which was inspired by the Badlands, just east of the brewery. Their beer is with buckwheat, sage, local honey, and yarrow. After a hike at Scout Camp, Crux Fermentation Project brewed “Redbarn Farm,” a red Saison ale with rye, rosehips, and fermented with Brettanomyces, a wild yeast strain. Fresh off the hike at Black Mountain, Deschutes brewer, and BMBW veteran, Veronica Vega was leaning toward making an IPA with yarrow and black currant and is putting finishing touches on the recipe.

Entrance is free; beers may be purchased in sample or pint sizes. All proceeds benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

Bend Beers Made By Walking Tapping Event

September 16th, 6-9pm

Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend, OR 97701

Find the event on Facebook

Contributing Breweries:

Crux Fermentation Project

Deschutes Brewery

Worthy Brewing

# # #

About Beers Made By Walking

Beers Made By Walking is a program that invites brewers to make beer inspired by nature hikes and urban walks. Since 2011, BMBW has worked with over 100 breweries in six states to create place-based beers that support local, environmental organizations and causes. beersmadebywalking.com.

About Oregon Natural Desert Association

The Oregon Natural Desert Association is a Bend-based nonprofit organization that has worked to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert for more than 25 years. We’re actively working to protect stunning, ecologically significant areas in the Central Oregon Backcountry, John Day River Basin, Greater Hart-Sheldon Region and Owyhee Canyonlands. Learn more at ONDA.org

Beers Made By Walking Bend 2015

Beers Made By Walking is making a return to Bend and Central Oregon in 2015. Three hikes with Crux, Worthy and Deschutes (one each, that is).

Last year I had the privilege of going on the hike with Deschutes. I am signed up for the hikes with Crux and Worthy so far and hope to be on the Deschutes hike this year too.

Here’s my pitch. You get to go on a lovely hike in Central Oregon in some of the loveliest areas we have. You are accompanied by someone from ONDA and Eric Steen of Beers Made By Walking; so folks interested in the local flora, amongst other things. You also get a brewer and perhaps some other folks from one of our local breweries. The brewer not only connects with their local region but is inspired by it to make a beer based on the hike. Later this summer you get to drink those beers at a benefit for ONDA. Everybody wins all around. [See last year’s post (linked above) for some about the Scout Camp hike with Deschutes and the benefit later at BTBS.]

Beers Made Walking logo

Beers Made By Walking Announces

2015 Hikes with Breweries in Bend

Beers Made By Walking, the program that invites brewers go on nature hikes and make beer inspired by plants found on the trail, has partnered with the Oregon Natural Desert Association for a series of three hikes with brewers in the high desert of Central Oregon. Hikers will be accompanied by a local brewer. Hikes are free and open to the public, but space is limited.

Brewers attending hikes are challenged to create a unique beer that serves as a drinkable, landscape portrait of the trails that are walked. The resulting beers will be served at a special event in the late summer, in Bend, and proceeds from the beer will benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

The first hike is on May 20 with Crux Fermentation Project and registration is now open. Registration for the next two hikes begins one month from the hike date. The remaining hikes are on June 12 with Worthy Brewing and July 24 with Deschutes Brewery. Hikes take place in past and present ONDA wilderness proposal areas. [Note this means registration IS open for the Worthy hike in June.]

Hike Dates and Info

May 20, 9am-2pm – Scout Camp – Register Here

Breweries: Crux Fermentation Project

Description: Take a hike with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Crux Fermentation Project on the Scout Camp Trail. The trail is a 3 mile loop that is very steep in some places, and includes a short scramble over a rock shelf. Trekking poles are recommended if you have them! Also bring sturdy shoes, lunch, and plenty of water.

June 12, 9am-2pm – Badlands – Register Here

Breweries: Worthy Brewing

Description: Explore the Badlands with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Worthy Brewing. Wind through inflated lava and old-growth juniper forests. Take in views of impressive rock formations, and opportunities to scramble to view points of the Cascade mountains. Wear sturdy hiking shoes, pack a lunch and plenty of water.

July 24, 8am – 5pm – Black Canyon – Register Here

Breweries: Deschutes Brewery

Description: Hike Sutton Mountain’s Black Canyon with Oregon Natural Desert Association and Deschutes Brewery. Part of the John Day River Basin, this out and back hike will have some rocky terrain and slight elevation gain. Prepare for warm weather, pack a lunch and extra food, snacks, plenty of water, and sun-protection.

About Oregon Natural Desert Association:

Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) exists to protect, defend and restore Oregon’s high desert. Our vision is to see millions of acres of beautiful and ecologically vital public land permanently protected, home to diverse populations of wildlife, and available for people to enjoy forever. Working in partnership with more than 4,000 members and supporters, ONDA is the only group dedicated exclusively to the conservation of Oregon’s high desert rivers and landscapes. http://onda.org/

About Beers Made By Walking:

Beers Made By Walking is a program that invites people to step outside and see the place they live in a new light. We invite brewers to take nature walks and make beer inspired by the plants identified on the trail. Since 2011, we have worked with over 90 breweries in Oregon, Colorado, North Carolina, and Washington. Our hiking and tasting events act as educational and fundraising programs for environmental organizations in the regions we serve.

BMBW website /// BMBW Facebook /// BMBW Twitter

I hope to see some of you on these hikes! I know I’ll see the Moody’s on one of them.

Yaeger – Oregon Breweries

Oregon Breweries by Brian Yaeger

Date read: 08 February – 19 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Yaeger's Oregon Breweries book

Paperback, xx, 396 pages

Published 1 December 2014 by Stackpole Books

Source: Own (Amazon 3 December 2014) [According to WorldCat neither Deschutes Public Library or COCC’s Barber Library have it.]

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Portland
    • Northwest Portland
    • Southwest Portland
    • Southeast Portland
    • Northeast Portland
    • Portland Metro
  • Coastal
  • The Gorge-Eastern
  • Willamette Valley
  • Bend and Central
  • Southern
  • Beer Festivals
  • Bottle shops and Taprooms
  • Breweries to Come
  • Cheesemakers
  • Cideries
  • Portland Coffee Roasters

Commentary:

Let me state right up front that I enjoyed this book. More importantly, I find it valuable. For me, the factual data—the listing of so many of Oregon’s breweries in one place along with information on them—is what matters. The individual “story” of every brewery, or at least as told by the author, is not my main focus by any stretch, even though some are quite interesting.

I also appreciate how amazingly difficult it would be to write so many entries of basically the same information for all these breweries all the while trying to make them sound different. I would not relish that task. That said, the strain shows on occasion. And sometimes I imagine others might appreciate the author’s humor more than me.

Some “factual” and other issues first:

Full Sail is included in the Coastal group when it should be in The Gorge-Eastern, while Oregon Trail is included in Southern instead of Willamette Valley.

There are two listings of the breweries. The first is in the table of contents where they are separated into areas/regions (such as, Northwest Portland or Bend and Central) and then listed alphabetically. The second is the Brewery Locations map which lists them all alphabetically and then gives each a number that corresponds to, basically, the county it is in. That means all of the Portland breweries have one number (2) on the map.

A separate map of Portland, divided by quadrants, would be most useful!

I also realize that alpha order is easy but that doesn’t make it the right organizational tool, especially if you have multiple tools available. Some of the areas/regions would be harder than others but Coastal could go north to south or vice versa and The Gorge-Eastern could also easily go east to west, etc. That would make “small,” regional visit planning easier. This is not everybody’s use case though so not sure this is an entirely fair critique.

Each section has an intro that gives a quick overview of the region, along with a nice listing of non-beer-related places to visit. Each brewery entry generally consists of the following sections of info: Name and address, contact info, logo; textual entry; Beers brewed; The Pick; and a listing of other info like hours. Each full entry is from one to three plus pages and a few do not have The Pick and a few also do not have Beers brewed.

In the textual entry we get Yaeger’s impressions, perhaps an origin story or some other hook, and other facts or interesting tidbits. Beers brewed is what it purports to be, while The Pick is Yaeger’s pick from his visit. May not be available when you visit, of course.

The textual entry makes up most of the space in a brewery’s entry once past one page, so it is kind if interesting to see who gets more pages and who doesn’t (see, e.g., Ale Apothecary and Barley Brown’s). The final bit of info contains: Opened (year), Owner(s), Brewer(s), System, Annual production, Distribution, Hours, Tours, Takeout beer, Gift shop, Food, Extras. Some have less info at the end but most contain the same bits of data.

As I said up top, the strain of writing so many similar, yet hopefully different, entries took its toll once in a while. I certainly am not going to point out all of the minor distractions but I do want to point out a few.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales

“In the mid-eighties, Logsdon cofounded neighboring Full Sail Brewery, then colaunched yeast industry giant Wyeast Labs, so naturally the beers he and partner Chuck Porter make are yeast-forward saisons” (207).

Um, no, that doesn’t follow. “Yeast-forward” follows, perhaps. But “saison” most certainly does not. Full Sail is not particularly known for saisons and Wyeast has quite a few strains of yeast.

BricktownE Brewing Co.

“BricktownE’s location was built in the 1890s, according to owner and craft beer crusader Craig McPheeters, and a brothel used to operate upstairs. You could call their Workin’ Gal BrownE Ale, which busts a nutty flavor and mouthfeel, an homage.” (344).

Um. OK. He really did go there.

Caldera Brewing Co.

“Another amazing treat from my last visit was intended to be a replica of Red Sea, just like Mills brewed in Kona, but they accidentally left Mogli’s bourbon, chocolaty oak spirals in the fermentation tank. The resulting warming vanilla …” (347).

Wait. I’m supposed to drink beer from a brewery that can’t even begin to clean a fermentation vessel properly? If they leave physical items in their tanks accidentally, deity only knows what else is “left.” I think the story is probably something else and worded poorly. At least I hope so.

Draper Brewing

“He has experience at some small-by-most standards breweries including Lost Coast and Mad River, both in Humboldt County, which makes sense since he’s originally from Northern California. Mad River happens to be one of my favorite breweries from that area, so it stands to reason that he has folded some of the tricks he picked up there into his own operation” (350).

Not the way causation, or grammar, works. The last clause follows from the first clause of the first sentence but not from the clause it follows. The author’s liking of Mad River has nothing to do with any of the other clauses. Stackpole’s editors seem to be nodding off once in a while.

Walkabout Brewing Co.

“Nearly as popular is Jabberwocky, perhaps with the implication that each 22-ounce bottle implores you, in its best Lewis Carroll voice, to “drink me” (374).

Wrong character in a completely different work. Easy cultural references and allusions aren’t always good ones. And,, yes, I know that most people won’t get the difference, or care. But literature matters. Literary allusion matters.

Again, this had to be a very tough job and the author has done a fine job with a limited amount of space for each entry on the many, many breweries we have in Oregon. I’m not trying to nitpick by pointing out the above but show that there are some small issues; reasons for which I only rated it 4-stars.

Breweries to Come

[Keep in mind this book was released 1 December 2014; that is, is quite new]

This is a two-page listing of the breweries in the process of becoming operational; that is, in planning and/or outfitting.

Of the two mentioned for Bend, one (North Rim) has been open a while now and at least one other not listed (Monkless Belgian Ales) is also already open.

Also not listed, Craft Kitchen and Brewery is replacing Old Mill Brew Wërks, which is out of business.

Immersion Brewing has been announced.

Redmond’s scene is definitely growing. See the bottom of Jon’s post here for some new ones.

The problem with these sorts of books is that they are out-of-date as soon as they are published. For a place like Oregon even before publication. Remember, release date was not even four months ago.

I would really love to see this sort of thing as a wiki, with accompanying map(s), and various ways to slice and dice the data. Perhaps the Oregon Brewers Guild should do such a thing (just do it well!) and you could get access with SNOB membership. Wouldn’t help out-of-state visitors or the simply inquisitive and not-yet-converted.

Honestly, I just want it open and available. But who will maintain it? A definite early-21st century issue. This is not a dig on Yaeger’s book but on the entire class of book like this. His has superseded, at least partly, two other books. Neither of which is that old. His will be too. Soon.

Anyway, for the most up-to-date listing of Central Oregon breweries (and their order of operation) just look in Jon’s sidebar at the Brew Site.

Again, I think this is a darn fine book of its type. For me it will serve as a reference book (I did purchase a copy after all). I have already used it extensively in making plans for our trip this week to Portland.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge.

This is the 17th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend

Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, Oregon, on October 15th

What: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, OR
When: October 15th, 6-9pm
Where: Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend
Cost: Pay per pint or per sample

This post covers two events: the hike I went on and the unique tasting event at BTBS on 15 October. See below for more details of the both the tasting event at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café and of the hike.

Middle Deschutes River and Deschutes River Canyon. Beers Made By Walking, Oregon Natural Desert Association, and Deschutes Brewery Hike on 22 May 2014. [Photo courtesy of BMBW.]

Middle Deschutes River and Deschutes River Canyon. Beers Made By Walking, Oregon Natural Desert Association, and Deschutes Brewery Hike on 22 May 2014. That’s me in the brown hat and blue backpack up front. [Photo courtesy of BMBW.]

On 22 May of this year I went on a hike with to the Middle Deschutes River with Deschutes Brewery, Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) and Eric Steen of Beers Made By Walking. We hiked the Scout Camp trail down into the Deschutes River Canyon and saw the confluence of Whychus Creek and the Deschutes River, among other natural beauties.

Confluence of Whychus Creek (on right) and Middle Deschutes (on left) "on the ground," so to speak.

Confluence of Whychus Creek (on right) and Middle Deschutes (on left) “on the ground,” so to speak.
My entire Flickr set here.

More commentary and photos follow the info on the upcoming tasting at Broken Top Bottle Shop.

Beers Made By Walking (BMBW) is a program that invites brewers to go on nature hikes and make new beer inspired by plants that are identified on the trail. Each hike is unique and each beer that is produced is a drinkable landscape portrait of the trail we hiked. On October 15th, from 6-9pm at Broken Top Bottle Shop, beer lovers will have the opportunity to try new beers inspired by hikes around the Bend Region.

These hike-inspired beers were produced through a collaboration between BMBW and the Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) through a series of public hikes with brewers throughout the summer.

Participating local brewers that joined in on the hikes include Crux Fermentation Project, Deschutes Brewery, and Worthy Brewing.

Each brewer will serve their new beer on October 15th. Additionally, Laurelwood Brewing (Portland), and Seven Brides Brewing (Silverton) will also tap special beers based off hikes in their region.

Visitors will have the opportunity to meet the brewers, learn about the various hikes that inspired the beers, and learn about some of ONDA and BMBW’s recent work. Beers will be sold by the pint and in sample sizes until they run out. 100% of the proceeds from this event will benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association.

What: Beers Made By Walking Tapping in Bend, OR
When: October 15th, 6-9pm
Where: Broken Top Bottle Shop, 1740 NW Pence Lane, Bend
Cost: Pay per pint or per sample

Tap list and details available as of this moment:

Crux River Trail Sour
ABV 9.0. IBU 15. Special ingredients are, choke cherries, and mint. Also fermented with a mixed culture from Crooked Stave out of Colorado. This is a blend of our Saison and a barrel aged golden sour. There is crisp light tartness to it that blends very smoothly with the dry fruity flavors of the saison. There is also a slight pink color from the choke cherries, and a very slight mint flavor in the finish.

Worthy Walk on the Wild Side (Badlands Indigenous Ale).
6.5% ABV. 14 IBUs. Beer brewed with Juniper tips, juniper berries, Indian Rice grass, Desert Sage, wheatgrass, and fescue.

Deschutes Botanic Ale – A light and crisp beer with rye, wild sage, and meadowsweet, rose and Stella hops, inspired by a wildflower hike on the Middle Deschutes River.

Laurelwood Saison de Walkle – Saison with rose hips and elderberries. 5.5%, 12 IBU

Seven Brides Pseudo Tsuga IPA – Light bodied IPA with a piney aroma and resiny flavor from the addition of Douglas Fir needle tea. 5.4%, 60 IBU

I fully intend to be at this tasting and I hope you will be too.

xxxx

Eric Steen (BMBW), left. ONDA tour guide, middle. Veronica Vega (Deschutes), right.

There were a total of six people on the Deschutes hike: Veronica Vega (Deschutes Pub Brewer extraordinaire), Gina Schauland (Deschutes Social Media Coordinator & Event Promotions), our trail guide from ONDA, another young woman, Eric of BMBW, and me.

[Let me go on record and say that I am an ass regarding names. I sincerely apologize to the two young ladies whose names I don’t know. I guarantee you that I remember your faces, and, with any luck, the context from which I recognize you.] [Nikki! (no idea of spelling. The other young lady is Nikki. I think/believe.]

I was going to put about a dozen photos from our hike here but then I realized that there are 100s from the Canon and not just iPhone photos. Instead, I am uploading them and will link there here shortly. All of them. Unretouched.

Still. One more.

This is also the confluence of the Whychus and Deschutes. That spear coming in from the left ... Deschutes to the left, Whychus from the right.

This is also the confluence of the Whychus and Deschutes. That spear coming in from the left … Deschutes to the left, Whychus from the right. You can actually see water from both in this photo also.

I had the Deschutes Botanic Ale on 5 September when late one evening Sara and I wandered into the pub for a nightcap and it was on tap. The pub manager bought us our beer when she heard I had gone on the hike. I do not think it was supposed to be on and may have been so accidentally. Nonetheless, I quite enjoyed it and am looking forward to having it again at 5 or so weeks older. Which is only about difference; not “better.” With botanicals they can change quite rapidly.

I do not know where the rest of the Bend beer geeks were on these hikes; I heard there were low turnouts on the other two hikes also. Anyway, this was an amazing honor along with being an amazing adventure. Ok. I know the rest of you up here do hikes like these for breakfast but this made me work a bit. That’s neither here nor there.

The beauty was everywhere. From the tiny little flora to the grandeur of the rugged, sweeping views capped off by a perfectly blue sky with wispy clouds. Since we carpooled, I rode up to the hike area with Veronica and Gina and gained a little insight into my favorite big brewery. On the way back, Eric joined us and to be privy to the discussion between Veronica and Eric was, indeed, a privilege.

There was discussion of sourcing ingredients, which ingredients were inspiring Veronica and why, when in the process the various botanicals might be used and how, and so on. It was quite fascinating.

If you get a chance to go on a Beers Made By Walking hike do so. Just go.

McMenamins Kris Kringle 2013

On Friday I stopped by McMenamins Old St. Francis School to see brewer Mike “Curly” White who gave me a growler of the just-released-that-day 2013 Kris Kringle Traditional Yuletide Ale brewed by him along with two bombers of the Edgefield version. By the way: The flyer accompanying this years release lists slightly different hops that the one at the link.

Description: Just in time for the holidays, November 15th marks the release of this year’s McMenamins Traditional Yuletide Ale, Kris Kringle. The busy-as-elves McMenamins brewers have created another wonderful gift for your taste buds this holiday season. The 2013 version of Kris Kringle is a hearty and robust ale with a big and bold malt complexity as well as an intense and flavorful hop profile. This “winter warmer” highlights the rich, toasty, aromatic and chocolaty malt flavors as its very sturdy foundation. Generous amounts of four different hop varieties were added in five different additions, which delivers a magnificent and massive hop assault. There’s still some ginger and cinnamon added into the batch but the spices are a little more subdued than in years’ past. McMenamins brewers hope you enjoy this years’ version of our old Holiday favorite, Kris Kringle. Happy Holidays and a Wonderful New Year!

Ingredients: 

Malts: GWM Pale Ale Malt, GWM Munich Malt, GWM Wheat Malt, GWM 15L Crystal Malt, GWM 120L Crystal Malt, Baird’s Chocolate Malt.

Hops: Nugget (Bittering & Flavor), Chinook (Flavor), Cascade (Flavor & Aroma), Santiam (Flavor & Aroma)

Buzz Words: Robust, Hoppy, Festive

Alcohol: 6.84% • IBU: 90 • SRM: 15 

I took the growler and a bomber over to Paul and Sandi’s house that night, where we re-watched the 1st Thor movie since we were going to see the Thor: The Dark World on Saturday. I poured the wife a glass from the growler before I headed over since she wasn’t joining us for the movie.

McMenamins Kris Kringle Traditional Yuletide Ale 2013

McMenamins Kris Kringle Traditional Yuletide Ale 2013

Let me say up front that I enjoyed both versions, as did everyone else who tasted them.

Kris Kringle 2013 Old St. Francis School version:
A: medium level of fruity hops and very light pine.
C: Dark orange-brown.
Malty with a slightly sweet finish, while also having a slight hop bitterness in the finish. Was kind of wondering where all the claimed bitterness was hiding. I’m not complaining because I’m not a hophead. I found myself really enjoying this as a highly drinkable beer. It certainly is no session beer based on ABV but it was going down easily like one.

Kris Kringle 2013 Edgefield production brewery version:
A: far more aroma, especially more pronounced hops.
C: same color but definitely clearer, more heavily filtered.
Hoppier tasting and far more bitter. More attenuated; still malty but not sweet; dry finish. A very different beer, although the family resemblance was definitely there. Also found this one going down quite easily.

I enjoyed both and suggest you get to your local McMenamins and pick some up along with a bottle or two of the Edgefield production version and do your own head-to-head taste off. I’d be interested in hearing what you discover. Thanks, McMenamins!

Disclaimer: Beer provided to me free of charge by McMenamins.

Meier and Meier – Brewed in the Pacific Northwest

Brewed in the Pacific Northwest: a history of beer-making in Oregon and WashingtonGary Meier; Fjord Press 1991 (Western Writers Series No. 3)WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder

Read 21 July – 8 August 2013 

Comments:

This book, published in 1991, purports to list all of the licensed breweries in Oregon and Washington from the 1st in 1852 (Portland) to “the present” of 1991. They list 126 breweries in Oregon and 138 in Washington. But I do not know if those numbers take into account the microbreweries of the recent present which are listed in ch. 6, which includes 20 for Oregon and 15 for Washington. There they are all listed alphabetically by name and separated by Oregon and then Washington, unlike the ones in ch. 3 and 4 where the cities are listed alphabetically within their respective states.

The book is more than a simple listing of breweries, though. There are two introductory chapters on the history of beer and on the brewing process and requirements. There is an “interlude” chapter on Prohibition and another on saloons. There is a chapter which focuses solely on “The Big Three”: “Henry Weinhard of Blitz-Weinhard; Andrew Hemrich of Rainier; and Leopold Schmidt of Olympia” (129). The final chapter focuses on the rise of the microbreweries, although it is primarily a listing.

The listings are not simply a name within a city but contain a smattering of data on each brewery, if any was found. They range from the short, through the medium, to the more complete:

Coaledo: “This short-lived coal mining community in the Coos Bay area had a brewery from 1874 to 1875 that was run by Henry Tolle” (40).

Brownsville: “Mr. B. Clomer held a brewery license in this Linn County town in 1878 and 1879, but there is no record that a brewery was built or that any beer was actually made. Perhaps he couldn’t brew up enough support or financing to get going” (36).

Coos Bay (Marshfield, at the time): includes a lengthy listing, compared to the above two, listing several changes of hands of a brewery that existed from 1868 to 1912, along with a very short note about two other breweries (41).

The book includes lots of black & white photos depicting breweries, bottles, advertisements of assorted kinds, and other breweriana.

If you are interested in a bit of history on beer making in Oregon and Washington, with what purports to be a complete listing of licensed breweries up until 1991, then this book is for you.

Contents:

  • Foreword     vii
  • 1 The Universal Beverage     11
  • 2 Copper Kettles and Wooden Barrels      16
  • 3 Brewed in Oregon         30
  • Interlude One: The Infamous 18th Amendment     76
  • 4 Brewed in Washington     82
  • 5 Henry, Andrew, and Leopold: The Big Three     129
  • Interlude Two: “Belly Up to the Bar, Boys”: The Saloons     164
  • 6 In the Old Stye: The Microbreweries     170
  • Glossary     191
  • Source Notes     195
  • Bibliography      197
  • Index     203

My notes:

Foreword

First brewery established in Portland in 1852 (vii).

1: The Universal Beverage

Clearly pop history as no citations for things like: “… and an Assyrian clay tablet relates that beer was taken aboard Noah’s Ark” (11). While I call this “pop history” it is not meant as a denigration. It only means that the book was intended to be sold to people who would be put off by the apparatus of scholarly works. This seems to be a very well researched work that the authors claim took three years to research, and they comment on the sources used in both the foreword and in the source notes [see below]. There is also a bibliography that includes a list of books, newspapers and periodicals.

§ Beer in North America

1st recorded commercial brewery – “established in 1612 by a Dutchman and a Dane, Block and Christiansen, in New Amsterdam (New York).” (13)

§ The Advent of Lager Beer

“Lager beer revolutionized the American brewing industry by offering a lively foaming beer that was more palatable to most people than were the old-style beers.” (15)

2: Copper Kettles and Wooden Barrels

“Commercial brewing in the Pacific Northwest began in 1852, when a German immigrant named Henry Saxer established his Liberty Brewery at the new village called Portland in the Oregon Territory. He missed being the first brewer on the Pacific Coast by three years; that honor went to San Francisco brewer Adam Schuppert in 1849.” (16)

  • #2 1854 – Nicholas Delin in Steilacoom
  • #3 1855 – Emil Meyer in Walla Walla
  • #4 1856 – John Muench in Fort Vancouver
  • #5 1856 – J. J. Holman in Jacksonville
  • #6 1858 – Martin Schmeig in Steilacoom
  • #7 1859 – “Henry Weinhard bought the Muench brewery across the Columbia River from the city that would bring him fame.” (16)

Local hops and barley cultivation from around 1865. Shipped from San Francisco previously (16-17).

Book covers 138 breweries in Washington and 126 in Oregon (19 and earlier). [But see above count as I don’t know if this number reflects the microbreweries in ch. 6.]

§ How the Brewer Made His Beer

§ Pails, Kegs, and Bottles

Picture on p. 23 of a few of the 333 types of beer bottle stoppers patented in the US between 1880 and 1890. [333 in a decade!]

§ The Never-Ending Need for Ice, Ice, Ice!

§ Tall Windows and Stately Walls: Brewery Architecture

3: Brewed in Oregon

“Oregon has had 126 licensed breweries from 1852 to the present [1991].” (30)

This was across 53 cities, if not including the microbreweries from ch. 6.

Interlude One: The Infamous 18th Amendment

“By the time the 18th Amendment was added to the U.S. Constitution, effective January 16, 1920, Oregon and Washington had already been “dry” for four years by popular vote.” (76)

“Local option law” put in effect in Oregon in 1904 and in Washington in 1909, and some counties went dry (77).

“Home rule” laws made even more confusing – cities could make their own decision and be opposite of their county (77).

Nov 3, 1914 the “drys” won in both OR and WA “one chief factor in that surprising outcome was the vote of women, who had gained the voting rights two years before. It is estimated that three out of four of every women who voted chose prohibition” (78).

“Appropriate amendments were drafted into the states’ constitutions, and prohibition arrived in Oregon and Washington on January 1, 1916” (78).

I find that many people in the Pacific Northwest seem to be either unaware of this or perhaps they simply ignore it. But I fail to see how one can discuss Prohibition in the PNW and ignore this. Oregon and Washington were fully dry four years before national Prohibition and parts of each were dry for sixteen and eleven years, respectively. I had known about the start of Prohibition in 1916 for Oregon but I did not know about Washington or the earlier period of ridiculous complexity surrounding alcohol in Oregon and Washington until reading this book.

§ National Prohibition

4 Brewed in Washington

138 breweries, “since 1854, when Nicholas Delin first started making beer in Steilacoom. Two of the original breweries are still in operation, and a number of new smaller ones are producing beer for a loyal following” (82).

  • Spokane  – “… many breweries over the years, all of them now gone, except for two recent microbreweries that carry on the tradition” (104).
  • Vancouver – 1935, five men formed Great Western Malting Co.; three well-known brewers – Arnold Blitz of Blitz-Weinhard, Peter Schmidt of Olympia Brewing, Emil Sicks of Sicks’ Rainier Brewing Co., and Bill Einzig, manager; Morgan Kellett, operator. (123)

This was also across 53 cities, if not including the microbreweries from ch. 6.

5 Henry, Andrew, and Leopold: The Big Three

“Three of these historic beer plants, established long ago by their pioneer founders, are with us still, and they have grown to become the largest brewing operations in the Pacific Northwest, and among the largest in the country. We see their names daily as familiar memorials to the three old-time German brewers who created them: Henry Weinhard of Blitz-Weinhard; Andrew Hemrich of Rainier; and Leopold Schmidt of Olympia” (129).

§ Henry Weinhard and the Blitz-Weinhard Story

“In 1863 Henry Weinhard bought property away from the center of town, with only a single road into the place, and here he built his new brewery. It was on the same site where Blitz-Weinhard stands today. He called his new enterprise the City Brewery, …” (133).

In 1882 he replaced the wooden buildings with “what Oregon historian H. K. Hines called ‘an immense pile of brick, which covers the entire block,’ at what is now 12th and West Burnside.” It went from 11th to 13th St; the bottling plant was across the street on Couch St; stables for beer-wagon horses on 13th; large warehouse at steamboat docks (134).

Great philanthropist (134-6).

1890 – Output of 40k barrels/yr. Pacific Coast, Western states and territories, Portland (of course) and China, Japan, the Philippines, and Siberia (136).

Good employer (136-7).

Survived Prohibition by making soft drinks, fruit drinks, syrups, flavorings, toppings, and a malt extract for cooking (138).

Merged with the Portland Brewing Company of Arnold Blitz in late 1927 to become Blitz-Weinhard (138-9).

“After 1953, when Sicks’ Brewing Co. closed its Salem plant, Blitz-Weinhard was the only brewery in Oregon” (140).

“In 1977 Blitz-Weinhard was America’s fifteenth-oldest brewery. But the year 1979 marked the end to one of the last independent breweries. On January 31 of that year the Oregonian announced the sale of Blitz-Weinhard to Milwaukee’s oldest brewery, the Pabst Brewing Company, founded in 1844. …” (141).

Bought by G. Heileman Brewing of La Crosse, WI in 1983, which was bought by an Australian company, Bond Corp. Holdings, Ltd. in 1988 (141).

“Now” employs 350 people and brews 1.2M barrels/year (141).

§ Andrew Hemrich and His “Rainier Beer”

“The site at 3100 Airport Way South [was Ninth Ave. S.] is now the home of the modern Rainier Brewing Company” (photo caption, 144).

Sold the Rainier label to a San Francisco brewery when state Prohibition came in 1916 (146/147).

Sicks’ Seattle Brewing & Malting Co had bought back the Rainier label in 1938 (149).

Since the mid-50s the majority stockholder was Molson Breweries, Ltd. Sold by Molson to G. Heileman in 1977. Heileman bought by Australian company [see B-W above] in 1987 (150).

“Rainier Brewing Co. employs about 550 people, …” (150).

“The former pre-Prohibition Seattle Brewing & Malting Co. buildings in Georgetown at 6004 Airport Way South are worth a look too. (151). [Although I seriously doubt they still stand empty today.]

§ Leopold Schmidt of Olympia—”It’s the Water”

Interlude Two: “Belly Up to the Bar, Boys”: The Saloons

“Hollywood Westerns notwithstanding, much more beer than whiskey was downed in saloons. Except for certain arid regions of the Southwest, where it was impractical to import beer from distant breweries, kegs and bottles of ice-cooled beer were an integral part of the barroom inventory” (164).

“Before Prohibition, the saloon was strictly a male stronghold” (165).

§ The Tradition of the “Free Lunch”

Had to buy a beer first; foods were usually spicy and salty to bring on thirst (168).

6 In the Old Style: The Microbreweries

“These are the present Pacific Northwest microbreweries. Any or all are worth a visit.” (171).

Keep in mind that these are supposedly current up until some point in 1991. I would be interested if anyone knew of any missing breweries. Also, there is more information on each of these in the book.

Oregon Microbreweries

  • Bay Front Brewery & Public House – Newport; Opened July 1989 – companion to Rogue Brewery in Ashland
  • Bridgeport Brewing Company – Portland; 1984, Oregon’s oldest operating micro (171)
  • Cornelius Pass Roadhouse – Hillsboro; 1986, a McMenamin brewery (172)
  • Deschutes Brewery & Public House – Bend; 1988
  • Fulton Pub & Brewery – Portland; May 1988, a McMenamin brewery (173)
  • Highland Pub & Brewery – Gresham; June 1988, a McMenamin brewery
  • High Street Brewery & Cafe – Eugene; Nov 1988, a McMenamin brewery (174)
  • Hillsdale Brewery & Public House – Portland; First in the McMenamin chain; “As of April 1990, the McMenamins have opened seven other brewpubs in Oregon” (174).
  • Hood River Brewing Company – Hood River; fall 1988 (174-5)
  • Lighthouse BrewPub – Lincoln City; July 1986, a McMenamin brewery (175)
  • McMenamins – Beaverton; April 1990, a McMenamin brewery (176)
  • Oregon Trail Brewery – Corvallis; July 1987; Willamette Valley’s oldest brewery (176)
  • The Pizza Deli & Brewery – Cave Junction; July 1990
  • Portland Brewing Company – Portland; Jan 1986 (177)
  • Roger’s Zoo – North Bend; Jan 1987 (178)
  • Rogue Brewery & Public House – Ashland; 1988
  • Steelhead Brewery – Eugene; Jan 1991 (179)
  • Thompson’s Brewery & Public House – Salem; Jan 1990, a McMenamin brewery (180)
  • Widmer Brewing Company – Portland; 1985
  • Widmer Brewing Company – Portland; ” expanded in August 1990 to the second location” (180)

Washington Microbreweries

  • Big Time Brewing Company – Seattle; 1 Dec 1988 (181)
  • Duwamps Cafe & Seattle Brewing Company – Seattle; Nov 1990
  • Fort Spokane Brewery – Spokane; July 1989 (182)
  • Hale’s Ales – Spokane; “First established in Colville in the winter of 1983 …. The brewery was moved to Spokane in September 1991” (182).
  • Hale’s Ales – Kirkland; 2nd brewery, early 1987 (182-3)
  • Hart Brewing – Kalama; 1984 (Pyramid( (183)
  • Maritime Pacific Brewing Company – Seattle; Sep 1990 (184)
  • Noggins Brewery and Restaurant – Seattle; 20 Oct 1988
  • The Pacific Northwest Brewing Company – Seattle; May 1989 (184-5)
  • Pike Place Brewery – Seattle; Oct 1989 (185)
  • Redhook Ale Brewery – Seattle; 1982 (185-6)
  • Roslyn Brewing Company – Roslyn; May 1990 (186)
  • Thomas Kemper Brewery – Poulsbo; Jan 1985 (187)
  • Yakima Brewing & Malting Company – Yakima; July 1982 (188)

Glossary

Source Notes

Some general books on beer were helpful (195).

“The information on specific breweries came chiefly from primary sources, such as: historical records of the United States Brewers’ Association; contemporary newspaper accounts; business directories; county and state records; and the myriad of letters, documents, reminiscences, and advertisements concerning old-time local breweries in the archives of the 54 county and regional historical societies” (195).

State and local histories and profiles of noteworthy residents (195).

Bibliography

This book is definitely worth a look. After reading a hardback copy that I got from OSU Valley Library (TP 573 .U5 M45 1991) I purchased a used paperback copy (ISBN: 0940242532).