Loftus – Sustainable Homebrewing

Sustainable Homebrewing: An All-Organic Approach to Crafting Great Beer by Amelia Slayton Loftus
Date read: 09 – 17 January 2017
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2017nfc

Cover image of Sustainable Homebrewing by Amelia Slayton Loftus

Paperback, ix, 357 pages
Published 2014 by Storey Publishing
Source: Deschutes Public Library [641.873 LOFTUS AMELIA]

I enjoyed this quite a bit and would find owning a copy useful. My reservation hinges on what might be a marketing issue. There are several extant, amazing books on beginning homebrewing—from extract to full grain—such that I don’t understand why so much space is spent on it in a specialty book like this. But, then, most do. Which is my point regarding marketing. Perhaps the topic would be too niche to sell on its own but I, for one, would appreciate more on the specialty topic/angle and less of the here-it-is-again basics.

The basics are covered well here and, to be honest, it is, for me, a slog to read basic homebrewing instructions over and over. My eyes start glazing over I have read so very many. [Unless one is looking at the evolution of homebrewing instructions in print and then ….] I would prefer more of the space in a specialty homebrewing book be spent on the specialty topic rather than on basic brewing instructions and equipment coverage, unless it is appropriate to the topic. Perhaps that is just me. Perhaps there is less of a market for such specialty books. I don’t know. Anyway, I heartily recommend this book.

Contents:

  • Introduction
  • Part 1: The allure and the art of homebrewing
  • 1 Looking at essential equipment and supplies
  • 2 Finding organic brewing ingredients
  • 3 The basics of brewing good beer
  • 4 Kicking it up: Brewing from scratch
  • Part 2: Sustainable brewing in the kitchen and garden
  • 5 The homebrewer’s kitchen
  • 6 The homebrewer’s garden
  • Part 3: Brewing organic beer
  • 7 Easier recipes for beginning brewers
  • 8 Advanced all-grain recipes
  • 9 Creating your own organic beer recipes
  • List of beer recipes
  • Metric conversion chart
  • Resources
  • Index

Basically, these are my extremely succinct notes. They ought, at least, give you an idea as to what is behind the chapter titles.

Introduction – two pages. “Being a good brewer,” for her involves good stewardship; sustainability. Lists two handfuls of early organic breweries and beers. Covers her 3 main reasons for brewing organic.

  • Supports organic agriculture and small-scale farming
  • Beer is food. [If you eat organic when possible …]
  • Is cheaper in the long run

Part 1: The allure and the art of homebrewing – covers equipment, ingredients, basic extract brewing plus steeping to all-grain brewing.

1 Looking at essential equipment and supplies – developing a personal ecosystem, considering the cost of manufacturing, fair wage produced and fairly traded. Covers equipment in some detail. Geared towards 5-gallons of lighter beers or smaller batches. Efficient use of raw materials, choosing eco-friendly materials, and finding equipment and supplies. How to be green and ecologically sound with cleaners and sanitizers; reusing them.

2 Finding organic brewing ingredients – covers ingredients and finding sources for organic ones, along with storage; also water and yeast.

3 The basics of brewing good beer – [skip if not beginner/basic, she writes] : Getting started; lots on yeast and making a starter, steeping grains, adding extract, …, hops additions, chilling, fermentation, bottling.

4 Kicking it up: Brewing from scratch – all-grain process, extra equipment needed, pH testing, mashing, …, water chemistry, mash pH, aeration, control of fermentation temperature.

Does not mention no-sparge or BiaB under sparging. A bit of a let down there, honestly.

Part 2: Sustainable brewing in the kitchen and garden

5 The homebrewer’s kitchen – using leftover yeast: harvesting, feeding to animals, yeast broth and yeast extract, vegetarian gravy. Using spent grain: nutritional content, animal feed (recipes for poultry feed and dog biscuits), cooking with spent grain (recipes for brownies, cookies, energy bars, granola, falafel, veggie burgers, pizza dough, assorted breads, pretzels), turning a bad batch of beer into vinegar.

6 The homebrewer’s garden – composting spent grain, hops, and yeast; vermiculture; making mushroom substrate from spent grain; recycling cleaning/sanitizing and cooling water; growing hops; growing barley; malting; kilning specialty malts; malting other grains; adding fruit to beer; adding vegetables to beer; and adding herbs to beer.

Part 3: Brewing organic beer

7 Easier recipes for beginning brewers –recipes, in both extract and all-grain versions, for a wide variety of styles.

8 Advanced all-grain recipes – another wide variety of styles and more complex recipes possibly involving fruit, step mashing, etc. that is a bit above beginner.

9 Creating your own organic beer recipes – converting existing recipes to organic, followed by lots of information on organic ingredients, recipe development, malt yields and similar concepts.

The list of beer recipes lists them alphabetically by name and also broken down, alphabetically also, under the headings: ales, lagers, porters and stouts, wheat beers, and miscellaneous.

Resources covers recipes, recipe calculators, brewing apps; testing laboratories; homebrewing resources; organic brewing ingredient sources; recommended reading.

One note on design: There are lots of “breakouts” but they got distracting due to placement; they were often several pages away from what referenced them. E.g., see Adjusting Hop Additions which is in middle of cooling options [67].

Highly recommended and would love to own a copy. I would like to revisit it for some ideas at some point.

This is the 7th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge 2017 [2017nfc] http://marklindner.info/blog/2017/01/01/2017-reading-challenges-goals/ and the 6th review. [These numbers are (for now) accurate; I had left out a nonfiction book read but not reviewed.]

New post:   #2017nfc #bookreview #organic #homebrewing

The Session 105: British Beer and TV

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session: What is it?

The Session, a.k.a. Beer Blogging Friday, is an opportunity once a month for beer bloggers from around the world to get together and write from their own unique perspective on a single topic. Each month, a different beer blogger hosts the Session, chooses a topic and creates a round-up listing all of the participants, along with a short pithy critique of each entry.”

In other words, it is a beer blogging carnival.

My previous posts for the session:

Session #105

This is Session #105 and the topic is Double Features, hosted by Mark at Kaedrin Beer Blog.

“For this installment, I’d like to revisit that glorious time of beer drinking when I was just starting to realize what I was getting into. One of my favorite ways to learn about beer was to do comparative tastings. Drink two beers (usually of the same style) with a critical eye, compare and contrast. Because I’m also a movie nerd, this would often be accompanied by a film pairing. It was fun, and I still enjoy doing such things to this day!

So your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to drink two beers, compare and contrast. No need for slavish tasting notes, but if you want to, that’s fine too. The important part is to highlight how the two beers interact with one another during your session (pun intended!) For extra credit, pair your beers with two films to make your own Double Feature. Now, I’m a big tent kinda guy, so feel free to stretch this premise to its breaking point.”

On Sunday, 01 November 2015, I watched the last two episodes of Doctor Who Series 2 [reboot, David Tennant] and drank two organic beers from Samuel Smith, one per episode. Both episodes constitute story 177 (according to Wikipedia) and consist of “Army of Ghosts” (ep 12) and “Doomsday” (ep 13) and were written by Russell T. Davies.

Samuel Smith Organic Pale Ale and Organic Chocolate Stout

Samuel Smith Organic Pale Ale and Organic Chocolate Stout

I didn’t know what my theme was going in (other than British beer & TV) but it turned out to be “Old beer and old episodes.”

Beginning with “Army of Ghosts” I drank a Samuel Smith’s Organic Pale Ale.  Pale seems to be a natural fit for ghosts.

SamSmithOrgPale

Aroma: kind of like a dubbel; sweet, light nuttiness & light burnt caramel. Color: dark amber; almost no head. Taste: Strange. Wonder how fresh? Not bad but should it taste like this?

A lot of blue-on-blue lately—3rd episode at least where the Tardis is placed near other blue objects which mostly fill the frame. I’m kind of blue about this beer. Going to need to check out those date codes later.

Torchwood building.

Freema Agyeman. 1st appearance on Doctor Who? Not as Martha, though. Yes! I was right.

“Who you gonna call?” Ghostbusters riff by Doctor & Rose. Just a tad cheesy but good pop culture reference.

“Why are you always reducing it to science? Why can’t it be real?” Jackie Tyler to The Doctor.

Must be some diacetyl; which I had been thinking for a while.

A “Void ship” : “a vessel to exist outside time and space.”

From the teaser for the next episode: “Cybermen and Daleks. Together we could upgrade the universe.” Upgrading (I hope) my beer.

Moving on to “Doomsday” I had a Samuel Smith Organic Chocolate Stout.

SamSmithOrgChocStout

A: chocolate syrup (coffee, fakey kind). C: black; short lasting tan head. Fakey chocolate syrup.

“I did my duty. I did my duty. Oh God. I did my duty.” Yvonne Hartman, Director of Torchwood ::Shudder:: I understand the horror of duty all too well. Sadly, I know many who understand it even it even more. My heart breaks.

The Cult of Skaro

“I did my bit for Queen and Country.” Yvonne as a Cyberman; black tears from her eyes.

Bad Wolf Bay

Woman in a wedding dress (Donna), who it turns out is only visiting and not coming back as a companion until next season even though she will be the companion for the first episode of season 3. Freema as Martha will be back as Martha very shortly for the rest of this season.

Well, this exercise taught me (reminded me blatantly, is more like it) that I need to be very careful with which beers I get at one of our local bottle shops. The next day (Monday) I researched Sam Smith date codes and this is what I found: http://freshbeeronly.com/Intl_Breweries.html My Pale Ale is SI13N1 = 13 Sep 2014 and the Stout is SC13N1 = 13 Mar 2014. Both are way too old for these beers. ::sigh::

So the moral, I guess, is old TV shows are OK to visit for either the first time or to revisit, as the case may be, but other than the beers-that-can-be-aged most beers should not be. Also, more importantly, learn to read obscure date codes and do so before buying. And advocate for legible and & comprehensible date codes on all packaged beer.

I apologize for how unfocused this all was. We had a different plan for this Session and that fell through for assorted reasons and I had to punt. Sadly, I bought beers that I knew I had enjoyed previously at the wrong place. And I am fully at fault for not checking/understanding the date codes. I do not fault Samuel Smith in any way and do not expect to have “fresh” beer from Europe but … most have not been so evidently off.