Worthy Experimental Hop Taste Test Tour

Worthy Brewing in Bend recently had on a flight of 4 beers made with experimental hops to solicit feedback on some of their potential hops from the Indie Hops and Oregon State University’s Experimental Hop Breeding Program. Roger Worthington, owner of Worthy, is also an owner of Indie Hops.

Photo of 4 taster glasses of Worthy Brewing experimental hop beers.

I participated in this at their Eastside brewery and taproom in Bend. I know what I thought of the new hops–as used in these beers–and now it is your chance as they are taking the beers on a mini-tour to several Portland locations and one in Gresham.

If you are interested in hops and would like just a smidgen of input into the future of potential hops then this is for you.

The press release follows:

WORTHY BREWING’S TOURING OREGON FOR FEEDBACK ON BEERS BREWED WITH EXPERIMENTAL HOPS

BEND, OR — Worthy Brewing will be holding tastings throughout Oregon and Washington on beers brewed with hops produced by Portland-based Indie Hops and Oregon State University’s Experimental Hop Breeding Program.

“We’re looking for the public’s feedback on the aroma and taste to help the Indie Hops/OSU program with future breeding projects,” said Worthy Brewing’s Brewmaster, Dustin Kellner. “It’s a great opportunity for craft beer lovers to help choose up-and-coming hop varieties.”

Worthy’s brewery team brewed up four pale ales using the following experimental varietals:  1007-35, C1002-37, G9-1-374 and  C115L-1.

Worthy Brewing’s team will be at the following venues holding flight tastings:

March 18 at 6-9 pm: Produce Row – 204 SE Oak St, Portland, OR 97214

March 20 6-9pm: Roscoe’s – 8105 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97215

March 25 at 2-5 pm: John’s Market – 3535 SW Multnomah Blvd, Portland, OR 97219

March 31 at 6-8 pm: Pacific Growlers – 11427 SW Scholls Ferry Rd, Beaverton, OR 97008

For more information, please contact Shannon Hinderberger at shannon@worthybrewing.com.

Worthy Brewing Company opened its doors in early 2013, delivering remarkably balanced, filtered ales that are hand-crafted using premium ingredients and the pristine water from the Cascade Mountains in Bend, Oregon. Worthy’s campus includes a large outdoor biergarten, full restaurant, and a greenhouse and hop yard onsite for growing estate and experimental hops in conjunction with Oregon State University and Indie Hops. An expansion will be completed in Spring 2017, featuring the “Hopservatory,” with a large telescope, “The Hop Mahal,” a banquet space, “The Beermuda Triangle” expanded indoor seating, and “The Star Bar,” an open air mezzanine bar.

 

Snowed In (The Session #108)

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

From Jon Abernathy at The Brew Site who is hosting this month’s Session:

“The theme is “Snowed In,” and I want it to be open-ended. It’s the first week of February—we are solidly in the grip of the winter, which means hunkering down from the cold and, depending on where you live, waiting for warmer days to thaw out the ice and snow. But perhaps it’s one of those winters, where the snow starts falling… and falling… and falling some more, and the next thing you know, schools are closed, there’s four or more feet of snow on the ground—and you are effectively snowed in and not going anywhere.

So what’s next? That is what I want you to write about—as it pertains to beer, of course! …

My birthday is 2/3rd of the way solidly into winter, late in February. People can complain about winter weather all they like—as do I on occasion—but my birthday is during that hell of sleet, rain, ice, snow, freezing winds and everything else that comes with being in the Midwest or Central Oregon in the dead of winter. I used to despise it but now I embrace it. I want it all. And I want all the winter types in February! Now I’m not sadistic; I am perfectly pleased with a day or two of each of the bad kinds of winter weather or even a good gobsmacking by two or three all in one day. Then it can go away. It can, of course, be as nice as it wants; although, admittedly, I’d be a bit freaked out by temps over 60F/15C.

All of that to say, I am fully down with Jon’s topic. And while perhaps not as prepared as I would like “knowing the snow’s coming” we are not unprepared either. Both contingencies will be addressed, as will most of the ideas Jon proposed.

Cold weather beer styles

My cold weather beer styles are pretty much my normal beer styles, although a few specific beers creep in during the colder temps. Imperial stouts and barley wines, barrel-aged or not, are our go-to beers, all year-long. I am not a fan overall of the winter warmer category but a few like Deschutes’ Jubelale and Anchor’s Our Special Ale/Christmas Ale do get put into the winter line-up, at least a couple of each. It also means trying more of them to hopefully find others that can do spicing the way I prefer; not many do. There are also other winter seasonals, such as Deschutes’ Red Chair, that also need a few or more imbibed.

Dip into cellar? Something special?

Here is where we are already prepared. Our cellar is two smaller fridges—4.4 and 11 cubic feet—which are temperature controlled, for which we have a by shelf inventory (spreadsheet). We also—as we buy more beer than we can actually cellar—have several boxes full, all of which is also accurately inventoried. Then there’s the general drinking beer which we do not bother (anymore) to put into the spreadsheet. “General drinking beer” may still be an Impy stout or a barley wine but we simply had no intention of cellaring them when we acquired them; we simply meant to drink them “soon.” We were buying mostly cellar beer for a good while. Had to get that (somewhat) under control. We also used to put every beer into the spreadsheet. We were young. Or something.

So … “snowed in and not going anywhere”? We do have projected dates for most of the cellared beers but we adjust some of the longer, more hopeful, dates based on drinking as we go. Some have definitely moved up across time. We also realized we needed to drink a lot more of them sooner rather than later based on incoming amounts so we are “suffering” our way through that. 😉

I am going to assume this is around my birthday in a couple weeks; thus, as of now anyway, first up would be my last Firestone Walker Double DBA Proprietor’s Reserve Series No. 001 (2012). I drank the previous one February 28th last year and it was freaking ridiculous. It was simply one of the best beers I have ever had the pleasure of tasting and we had a whole 22 oz. bottle to the two of us. I got four of these from our friends at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café in late 2013 and they have been amazing all along but the improvement along the way has been off the charts! So I have chosen this as this year’s birthday beer. Could change my mind but not thinking I will.

Next up for consideration:

Some of the tasties we are already scheduled to drink soon: 2013 editions of Brasserie Dieu du Ciel’s Péché Mortel, Dogfish Head’s World Wide Stout and Crux’s Tough Love. There are far more coffee stouts than the Péché, like a 2013 BCBS Coffee, a Stone 2013 IRS Espresso and a Founders’ Breakfast Stout. among a few others.

We might finally get on with our Fort George Cavatica Stout tasting. We have 16 oz cans of regular Cavatica Stout from 2014, along with the barrel-aged versions from the last few years: 2013 Rye, 2014 Rum (also 16 oz cans) and 2015 Bourbon (22 oz bottle). Should make for a fun excursion.

I spy a 2014 Firestone Walker Velvet Merkin slotted for sometime in 2016. Snowed in seems like as fine an occasion as any for it.

Perhaps one evening as we’re winding down, we could sip on a Westvleteren XII (2012) and contemplate our moments of good fortune. I still have three of these that I got in the “fix the roof” six-pack.

Like I said, there are others, listed in the spreadsheet or not, but these are some of the more intriguing and, in a few especial cases, better—fully world class—beers that would fit the extended snowbound occasion.

Stock up on go-to beer

Depending on the timing, I would want a case of Deschutes’ Jubelale. This year’s (2015) is my favorite so far. Every time I drank it I wanted another. Sometimes I chose not to but the “but I want another” was strong for me in this year’s Jubelale. The thing is … I only drink this fresh. Same as with Red Chair. And I do mean fresh. If I can’t verify this is only a month old or less I generally won’t touch it. My choice, I know. Saw a 12-pack at Haggen’s (supermarket) the other day (first week of January) for a reasonable price and I had a tough time rationalizing my way into following my own principles. I adore both of these beers but can only drink them for a few weeks each year as if it isn’t fresh it is not the same to me. I am not so much on this level of freshness with any other beers. Not at all. Don’t get me wrong I like fresh beer (and appropriately aged beers, no doubt) but this is some kind of hyperfreshness fetish. But, to me, when definitely fresh, these are both world class beers of the highest order but when not quite fresh anymore they rapidly start to approach “Meh. There’s better beer available in this town/bar/pub.” I don’t want to be there with either of these beers. So I self-limit in an odd way.

Picked up a case of Oskar Blues’ Ten Fidy Imperial Stout end of January. This is currently the wife’s go-to beer whenever I am drinking one of the many things I have around that she isn’t into. I also quite like it and generally leave it to her but with a case I can have a few. We’d been buying it by the 4-packs but realized I should just ask “my guy” for a case. Making that request a couple weeks ago reminded me I have no Anderson Valley Barney Flats Oatmeal Stout in the house either. Went through several cases of that the last couple winters especially as that was my go-to beer. Might need to grab a 6-pack or two and see how it’s tasting. Could need to talk to my guy about that again too.

I have been drinking a boatload of Pelican’s Umbrella Single-Hop IPA with Ella hops from New Zealand as my go-to beer lately. I’ve been loving the heck out of that! Also a bit strange as there are only a few IPAs—of any kind or color—that get me excited. And never one I have bought by the 6-pack! I was so excited when Umbrella was put in 12 oz 6-ers and made year-round. Crazy but there it is. Seems I need a good hop bite with none of that “Is it the roast malts, or the bitterness from the hops/coffee/chocolate/ … WTF is that bitterness?” that we get frequently in many of the beers we love.

Even more lately, I have been drinking Fremont’s Dark Star Imperial Oatmeal Stout in 12 oz cans. Fremont has just recently begun distributing in Bend but I have had several of theirs previously thanks to a local friend, Ryan, who is a big fan of them. In fact, he gave me one of these for my birthday last year. I gave it 5-stars (of 5) and wrote “Very creamy. Fruity. Nice. I like this a lot.” I left out the ridiculous roastiness, the massive mouthfeel during and long after, and the lingering complexity. This is big and chewy and at 8% seems even bigger.

Whoa! just checked Fremont’s website and they say this beer is only available January 1st to February 29th. Oh. Hell. No. Just shot my guy a message. Got a case on its way. This is stocking up on go-to beer, right?

Too late for more Jubelale for me this year but maybe if I truly knew the big one was coming I’d break my prohibition as it would still be a tasty beer, to say the least. I would want a case of at least one of the stouts but preferably the Ten Fidy as we need something Sara is happy to consume without investing lots of thought. Going with the Fremont for now but would not a couple 6-packs of the Barney Flats for something more sessionable and also of Umbrella. Need a little variety in your drinking beer, I do.

Homebrewer

I am a fledgling home brewer so do not yet even have all of the equipment and certainly not any ingredients for brewing up something on the spot—well, that’s a lie as I have a good 3/4 lb or so of Cascade pellet hops in the freezer that were given to me.

I have also not brewed in the snow yet but look forward to it. If I can find a way to make it possible.

I think a nice roasty, toasty porter or stout would be a good match for the weather and goes along with many of my other choices in this post.

“Desert island beer” but colder – snowed in for all of winter

Well … this depends. Is this something available and affordable to me? Is it something I choose for myself or for the wife and I both or something we choose together? Those questions will all influence the answer.

Considering that if it isn’t available to me (for whatever reason) or I cannot afford it (one of those reasons) then I’m not going to get it so we will just forget that blissful group of beers and move on.

I think, as of now, the easy answer is Barney Flats if only I’m choosing and Ten Fidy if I am for both of us, and possibly if we both choose one between us. I would go with the almost sessionable Barney Flats over the not-at-all-sessionable Ten Fidy myself as it would have a bit more range.

If I could somehow get fresh deliveries but only of the same beer I might for go this year’s Jubelale but that’s not really possible over Winter anyway since by then Red Chair has replaced it as a seasonal.

Beer book(s) paired with which beer

Well, there’s the easy answer of the appropriate style with each book in the Classic Beer Styles series from Brewers Publications, for instance Pale Ale with one’s favorite pale. I’m not sure what my favorite pale is although I know I like a few. Poking UnTappd I’m going to have to say either Deschutes Hop Trip, Block 15 Print Master’s Pale, Mazama Oregon SMASH, or Crux The Pale Ale.

I own Pale Ale (Foster), Porter (Foster), Stout (Lewis), and Barley Wine (Allen & Cantwell) (all of which I’ve read) and Vienna, Marzën, Oktoberfest (Fix & Fix) which I have not.

Probably couldn’t get very far at a time with Barley Wine unless sipping very slowly. I’ll leave it to you to choose appropriate beers for these and the following.

Might I suggest some possible combinations for your own consideration:

Boak and Bailey  Brew Britannia with the best approximation [if not in the UK] of English beer, preferably a sessionable one, that you can achieve in your location. Actual British beer would be preferable, with something from one of the upstarts even better. Perhaps you ought sit in your local and enjoy your beer there while you read it. That would be my choice. [Learned to read in bars in college & grad school, basically across my 40s. “Retired” from the Army and started college full-time to finish undergrad degree and eventually grad school.]

Patrick Dawson – Vintage Beer with anything cellared for over three years.

Sam Calagione – Extreme Brewing with some Dogfish Head Palo Santo Marron, or one of their other off-centered beers [same issue as Barley Wine above, though].

Terry Foster – Brewing Porters & Stouts with tasty porters or stouts or an assortment of the various sub-styles if your tastes are eclectic enough. Mine are. I can appreciate a well-made porter or stout of any origin.

There’s also the Brewing Elements series from Brewer Publications:

Stan Hieronymous – For the Love of Hops with a nicely hopped (whatever that is for you), hop-forward beer, with either your favorite hops or some of the newer German varieties or anything from New Zealand.

John Mallett – Malt with tasty malt-forward beers.

Chris White & Jamil Zainasheff – Yeast with tasty yeast-driven beers. [not yet read]

John Palmer & Colin Kaminski – Water with, well, not sure what a water-forward beer would be, but tasty beers where the style is heavily-dependent on the water profile seems a good start. [not yet read]

Then there are potentialities like working your way style-by-style through some of these:

Mirella Amato – Beerology [read, not yet reviewed]

Garrett Oliver – The Brewmaster’s Table

Jeff Alworth – The Beer Bible [read, not yet reviewed]

Randy Mosher – Tasting Beer

Brian Yaeger – Oregon Breweries (or your own state/region) with a selection of Oregon (or other “district” as appropriate)  beers

Jon Abernathy – Bend Beer [still need to do a proper review of this]

Pete Dunlop – Portland Beer (or your city)

Joshua Bernstein – The Complete Beer Course [not yet read]

Michael Jackson – Michael Jackson’s Great Beers of Belgium with as many of the great beers of Belgium you can (easily) get to hand. [not yet read]

Leaving the easy to come by—self-evident—beer-related pairings:

Anne Brontë – The Tenant of Wildfell Hall with some “home-brewed ale.”

“‘Sine as ye brew, my maiden fair,
Keep mind that ye maun drink the yill.’*”

“From ‘Country Lassie’, a song by Robert Burns (1792). ‘Sine’: then; ‘maun’: must; ‘yill’: ale (Scots dialect). Cf. the proverb, ‘As they brew so let them drink’ (ODEP, 85).” 227/433

If you are still reading, thanks. Sorry for going on so long but I was inspired by Jon’s topic, even if it was mostly meaningful to me.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School 3rd Annual High Gravity Extravaganza

On Saturday, January 16, 2016 we attended the McMenamins Old St. Francis School 3rd Annual High Gravity Extravaganza with 22 breweries & 4 cideries present. [updated beers drank 29 January 2016]

“Go Big or Go Home” is the motto.

For McMenamins passport fans there is an event stamp.

We got there pretty much at opening at 1 pm and like last year the weather was (or threatened to be) a bit wet so they had moved large portions into the theater. There were still couches and other seating available when we arrived so we joined some of our friends.

Photo of some of my notes, the program and two fest glasses from the McMenamins 3rd High Gravity Extravaganza

Disclosure:

Let’s just get this out of the way. I got put on the guest list so got a free entry package of tasting glass, 10 tokens, and a koozie. We did pay the $15 entry and got Sara her own glass and tokens though.

I like this festival as it brings together a lot of different McMenamins beers and brewers along with a fairly equal balance of beer from other local Bend breweries. The brewers from the 10 or so represented McMenamins breweries were there from 1-4 pm pouring their beers and I chatted with a couple including our local brewer, Mike “Curly” White. I didn’t get names but also a woman from Thompson (Salem) and a guy from Crystal (Portland) that I actually had conversations with and not just chit chat.

I didn’t bother to take any other pictures except of the names of the beers I was getting. Of course, I didn’t get pictures of the ones I tried via my wife and I didn’t get all of those written down. May well have missed one of the ones I got myself, photo-wise.

Definitely caught a good buzz. We stopped and got a pizza and drank a lot of water before heading home at a still reasonable time.

These are the beers that I tried in as close to the order that I had them (highly accurate):

  • McMenamins Old St. Francis School Midnight Scream Double Black IPA
  • McMenamins High Street (Eugene) 565 Strong Ale
  • Silver Moon Train Rye’d Barleywine
  • McMenamins on Munroe (Corvallis) Ballena Russian Imperial Stout
  • Deschutes The Descendant
  • McMenamins Anderson School (Bothell, WA) Into the Badlands IRA
  • McMenamins Thompson (Salem) Magnuson Strong
  • McMenamins Crystal (Portland) Another Day Malt Liquor *
  • Three Creeks Ten Pine Porter
  • Worthy Dark Muse 2015 Stout
  • McMenamins Edgefield (Troutdale) Edgefield Extra One Year Barleywine *
  • I am missing (at least) one that I had a taste of Sara’s and I believe that is Crux Snow Cave. [Bend Brewing’s Big Bad Russian is definitely missing from here. 29 January 2016]

My favorites were definitely the McMenamins Edgefield (Troutdale) Edgefield Extra One Year Barleywine and, very surprisingly, as 2nd oddest beer out, the McMenamins Crystal (Portland) Another Day Malt Liquor.

For the McMenamins Crystal (Portland) Another Day Malt Liquor I wrote:

“Haha. This shit is like crack. Sara had a sip, her face lit up, & had another before saying anything.”

That is surprising behavior for my wife with any lager-like beer except Samichlaus.

The alcohol wasn’t hidden from you, although it wasn’t exactly prevalent either, but you just wanted one sip after another and we aren’t talking small sips. This was a very dangerously “more-ish” beer and one of the best uses of corn ever in a beer. I was not expecting to like it under the context of the fest but it was exquisite. I got a chance to go back and tell the brewer all this after having it. That’s a feature of this fest, if you can go early.

For the Edgefield Extra One Year Barleywine I wrote:

“2014 barleywine in Hogshead Whiskey. Another (almost) crack beer.

? [unsure]

With palate cleanser cookie is awesomer in the opposite of Helldorado a deep dark chocolate barleywine. Crazy.”

Quite tasty. Not quite a crack beer because easier to tell its 10%+ ABV is present. But amazingly tasty. And far more “appropriate” for the time of the year.

I also enjoyed Deschutes The Descendant but that was the odd beer out for this fest. I don’t believe there were any other sours, and no other fruit beers either, I believe. Quite delicious.

Photo of the description of Deschutes The Descendant at the McMenamins 3rd High Gravity Extravaganza

My friend Jon Abernathy has a much better post and definitely more and better photos at his post, McMenamins High Gravity Extravaganza, thoughts and photos. If you check out Jon’s post you can see that we had pretty much the same thoughts on best beers of the day even though we did not have exactly the same ones.

My pre-post can be found here at McMenamins OSF Third Annual High Gravity Extravaganza 16 January.

If you are in Bend or the nearby area mid-January next year, and like high gravity beer, you ought consider this fest. I cannot comment on how it is in the evening as we insure that we are in and out before then, which is how we try to do fests. But we enjoy this one quite a bit.

Dunlop – Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana by Pete Dunlop; intro by Angelo De Ieso

Date read: 26-30 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Pete Dunlop's Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Paperback, 143 pages

Published 2013 by American Palate, a division of The History Press

Source: Own

Contents:

  • Foreword, by Angelo De Ieso
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Prologue
  • 1: Beginnings: Weinhard’s Beachhead
  • 2: Wrong Way: Road to Prohibition
  • 3: Prohibition: An Unwanted Disaster
  • 4. Repeal: Happy Days Are Here Again
  • 5: Long Shadow: Blitz-Weinhard’s Decline and Legacy
  • 6: Changing Times: The Origins of Craft
  • 7: Crucial Element: The Brewpub Revolution
  • 8: Building Beervana: Craft Beer Goes Mainstream
  • Epilogue. Why Portland?
  • Appendix I. SB 813 (Brewpub Bill)
  • Appendix II. Beerology [glossary]
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • About the Author

I started and read a good bit more than half of this in Portland last week. I own and have read one other book in this series, Bend Beer, by my friend Jon Abernathy. I know that Jon used Dunlop’s book as a model, and a good one it is.

Pete Dunlop is well-qualified to write this book. He’s been in Portland since 1989, has a masters degree in history, has taught high school journalism, and has worked in marketing communication [author bio]. You can find his Beervana Buzz blog here.

Easy. Quick. Informative. Dunlop offers reasons for “Why Portland?” but knows (and demonstrates) that it was/is complex and there are other possible ways to tell the story.

Highly recommended! Not just for fans of Portland beer and breweries but for anyone interested in some of the issues that led to the most breweries in a “single” location.

If you like beer and history then borrow this book from somewhere and read it. Or, of course, buy it. I did.

This is cross-posted at my other blog, habitually probing generalist, for purposes of the below reading challenge:

This is the 20th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

“Virginia” beer

The wife and I spent a week recently in the Falls Church, Virginia area enjoying lots of beers; only some of these were from Virginia so I put “Virginia” in double quotes. We went for a memorial service for my niece who recently passed and with so much family together again we also celebrated Thanksgiving and my brother-in-law’s birthday on Dec. 1st. With so many relatives in one house, along with the stress of saying goodbye to a loved one, and multiple receptions, and … a lot of beer (and wine) was consumed.

My daughter and son-in-law picked us up at the airport Wednesday evening. We stopped at Dominion Wine & Beer @DominionWB in Falls Church, VA on the way to my sister’s house. Great selection and friendly people. They told us about a free tasting of big beers on Black Friday for the Bourbon County Brand Stout release and even had the bottles on the counter.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

We made sure to add it to our calendars.  The real beauty: it is about a 5-minute walk away from my sister’s place. We will definitely be visiting them whenever we make it back there. In fact, we visited 3 or 4 times in the week we were there.

Before we left Bend, Sara discovered that there is a Dogfish Head Alehouse in Falls Church so that was high on our list and we made it there Sun evening (30th). We also wanted to get to Spacebar, a specialty grilled cheese and tater tots craft beer bar, which we did Monday night.

I failed to checkin every beer in Untappd. I even failed to record/list every (unique) beer and also to take a picture of every one. Of course, some were duplicates and I didn’t want to check them in. Some I just missed.

This post is in 3 parts: commentary on the tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer; our 1st visit to a Dogfish Head Alehouse; and a list of the beers that I know I had, by day, as best as possible.

Dominion Wine & Beer BCBS Release Tasting

On Friday, my kids, their spouses, and Sara and I attended a tasting in conjunction with the Goose Island BCBS release at Dominion Wine & Beer. We got there a few minutes early and the place was packed and the tasting had already started. The gentleman pouring made sure to get us started at the beginning though. It was packed to the gills but everyone jostled along good-naturedly. I overheard the guy at the checkout telling someone that this is their biggest tasting by far; that most are far more manageable. Good to know. 😉

Let me just say that any tasting that begins with Epic’s Big Bad Baptist is something to not only behold but to be at. Seeing as we were going so big I only tried to grab an overall impression and didn’t write any tasting notes. These are the beers in the order we had them.

  • Epic Big Bad Baptist (Batch 40) [no checkin]
  • North Coast bbl-aged Old Rasputin 4.5
  • Stone Southern Charred 4.5
  • 3 Brothers Resolute 4.0
  • Avery Tweak 4.5
  • Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout 2014 4.5

As you can see I liked most of them well enough. 😉

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church, VA

Dogfish Head Alehouse of Falls Church, VA

Dogfish Head Alehouse of Falls Church, VA

Sunday evening found 9 of us heading to the Dogfish Head Alehouse in Falls Church (Mom, kids and spouses, sister and spouse, Sara and me). Sara and I were practically giddy. Overall our visit was excellent.

There were some issues with getting the correct beers in both of the premium flights ordered (Max and Sara) and the onion rings on two orders were cold. Our waitress, Marian, was most excellent. She got fresh hot onion rings for both and she tried to get the beer issues straightened out. Whoever was pouring was not on their game, that’s for sure. Possibly the wrong beer was on the wrong tap. Sara & Max both got 4-beer flights with one beer overlapping. That beer was different in both cases and was not the beer asked for. They were both replaced but the beers were still different (color, taste). Then Sara discovered her Palo Santo Marron was Chicory Stout. She doesn’t care for it and it is a standard beer compared to the premiumly-priced Palo Santo. Marian was horrified and was going to replace it but since I had a snifter of the Palo Santo we decided to just share that. We certainly had enough beer between us.

Heavenly snifter of draft Palo Santo Marron

Heavenly snifter of draft Palo Santo Marron

I did pull Marian aside and tell her that she was awesome as far as were were concerned. In the end, I also talked to the manager. I started by telling him Marian was “grace under pressure” and that we appreciated her. I also calmly let him know we had been having beer issues and that he might want to keep an eye on the bar tending. He was already on it since Marian had alerted him. He was grateful for the information and apologetic. My son grabbed the entire bill so I have no idea if either did anything with the bill. Nonetheless, everyone got at least as much (or more) beer as they ordered and everyone had plenty of tasty food.

I would be happy to go back as everyone we interacted with acted professionally and sometimes stuff just happens.

Beers consumed

[Note: except for 1-2 already at the house and those at Dogfish Head and at Spacebar, all beers were acquired from Dominion Wine & Beer. The ones already at the house may also have come from Dominion.]

26 Nov

  • Yuengling Traditional Lager 4.0
  • Dark Horse Too Cream Stout 4.0
  • Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout Unrated [late checkin]
Yuengling Traditional Lager

Yuengling Traditional Lager

Dark Horse Too Cream Stout

Dark Horse Too Cream Stout

Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout

Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout

The Yuengling surprised me with how good it was. I would gladly drink several in the proper setting. The two Dark Horse stouts were fairly tasty.

27 Nov

  • Saison Dupont 5.0
  • The Duck Rabbit Milk Stout 4.5
  • Great Lakes Blackout Stout 4.0
  • Bells Two Hearted Ale 4.5
  • Brasserie d’Achouffe McChouffe 4.5
  • Dogfish Head Beer Thousand  4.5
  • Evil Twin Molotov Cocktail 4.0
  • Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine 4.0
  • Tröegs Troegenator 4.0 [late checkin]

Had a classic, Saison Dupont, as an opener and during my stint as a sous chef for others. Ended up drinking most of the bottle myself. I tried to share. Their loss.

04Bells 044

Bells Two Hearted Ale

d'Achouffe McChouffe

d’Achouffe McChouffe

Dogfish Head Beer Thousand

Dogfish Head Beer Thousand

07EvilTwin 047

Evil Twin Molotov Cocktail

Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine

Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine

Tröegs Brothers Troegenator

Tröegs Brothers Troegenator

28 Nov

  • Tröegs Troegenator [probably]
  • Epic Big Bad Baptist Batch 40 – seems no checkin [DominionWB tasting – see section above]
  • North Coast bbl-aged Old Rasputin 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Stone Southern Charred 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • 3 Brothers Resolute 4.0 [DominionWB]
  • Avery Tweak 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Goose Island Bourbon County 2014 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Hardywood Virginia Blackberry 4.0
  • Sam Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock 2.5
Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Hardywood Virginia Blackberry (Reserve Series)

Hardywood Virginia Blackberry (Reserve Series)

Samuel Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock

Samuel Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock

29 Nov

  • Schlafly Imp Stout, bourbon barrel-aged 4.5
  • Southern Tier Choklat – no checkin

Personally, I do not care for Choklat. At all. The wife does and bought this one. I think maybe she’s outgrowing her fondness for it. I hope.

Schlafly Imperial Stout 2013

Schlafly Imperial Stout 2013

Southern Tier Choklat

Southern Tier Choklat

30 Nov

Dogfish Head Alehouse

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church beer menu on 30 November 2014

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church beer menu on 30 November 2014

I had a small taste of both Firefly and American Beauty but wasn’t impressed enough to want a whole glass. So many other good choices. Went with the Palo Santo Marron, my first on draft. It was exquisite, of course.

FYI: The Core Beer Sampler is 6 4-oz pours of 60 Minute through Chicory Stout; the Premium Sampler is 4 4-oz pours of any four premium beers. The pours are quite generous and easily 5-oz each. I went for the snifter as I am a bit unhappy at the 50% increase in price along with a decrease of 33% in the amount of beer. That is quite significant and way beyond “premium.”

1 Dec

  • Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout – Tad thin but OK  3.0
  • Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA 4.5 [late checkin]
  • Peak Organic Winter Session Ale ME 5% 4.5 [Spacebar]
  • Terrapin Wake n Bake [Spacebar -Sara]
  • Blue Mountain Long Winters Nap Maibock VA 10% 4.0 [Spacebar -Sara]
  • Smuttynose Smuttonator Doppelbock NH 9.5% 4.0 [Spacebar -Sara]

I wish I had recognized that the KBBS was the one Brian Yaeger wrote about in Red, White, and Brew. Neither Sara or I were fans either way; it was pretty meh. I enjoyed the Face Plant.

It was too dark at Spacebar for photos. My Peak Organics Winter Session was quite tasty. I also enjoyed trying Sara’s Blue Mountain and Smuttynose. My son and his wife both got Deschutes Black Butte Porter.

ALLTECH Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout

ALLTECH Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout

Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA

Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA

2 Dec

None – travel day

Actually, I tried to get a beer in the Portland (OR) airport before our flight home to Redmond. Our little terminal even had a Laurelwood pub. But since the waitress could not answer what I considered a most basic question about a beer I left. I wanted to know whether the stout had coffee in it. She was apologetic that she didn’t know but that is irrelevant; it is polite but of no actual informational value. She also didn’t volunteer to check with anyone else.

I don’t know if those folks are airport concessionaires or actual Laurelwood employees but they were wearing Laurelwood attire. Protip: Educate your employees or people acting as employees. She lost you the sale of a pint and food. She also lost you the good will of a tired, pissed off traveler who came to you for respite and replenishment.

Recap

A lot of good beer was drunk, along with a bit of mediocre stuff. That’s the deal when being adventurous though.

We sent my daughter and son-in-law back home (they drove) with a 2013 The Abyss and a Black Butte Porter Reserve XXVI which I had checked on the way. They also took the small bottle of BCBS we bought at the tasting and a couple other things. We also left a few tasties for my sister and brother-in-law.

Thanks, northern Virginia (especially Dominion Wine & Beer) and thanks to the Virginia brewers/breweries for the actual VA beers we did have.

Upon arriving home just before midnight on Tuesday, we found a very wet box on the front doorstep. Pulling it inside and unwrapping it found–bedraggled but not frozen– two Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA bombers, a grapefruit, USB key and pint glass. It must have been delivered late in the day and, for once, everyone’s timing was good (except for the beautiful presentation which was a bit disturbed).

Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA package

Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA package

Brown – Three Sheets to the Wind

Three Sheets to the Wind Three Sheets to the Wind: one man’s quest for the meaning of beerPete Brown; Pan Books 2007WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

Read 20 Aug – 15 Sep

My review from goodreads:

I really enjoyed this. I just wish they didn’t plaster “The beer drinker’s Bill Bryson” (TLS) all over his books. I almost didn’t buy it because of that. I can see the comparison but I do not find Bryson funny generally and his humor ventures into almost being cruel in his poking fun at times. I find Pete Brown downright funny and even if he manages to enter potential cruel territory he pulls it off with a certain British charm. May not make it any better—not claiming it does–but it is far more gentle and, dare I say it, unintended. Sorry to my friends who are Bryson fans. We’ll just have to disagree about him. 5 stars.

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgements
  • One: ‘Just the one’
  • Two: ‘Los Borrachos’
  • Three: ‘Where you find beer, there you find good life’
  • Four: ‘A hundred thousand welcomes’
  • Five: ‘The smell of freshly poured beer is the smell of my country’
  • Six: ‘Beervana’
  • Seven: ‘Mate, are you right?’
  • Eight: ‘Toriaezu birru’
  • Nine: ‘Countless thousands of fattened creatures…’
  • Ten: ‘… making themselves objects of derision…’
  • Eleven: ‘Wi’aht it, he’s miserable’
  • Appendix: Where to buy
  • Further reading

Three Sheets to the Wind is a travelogue that attempts to fulfill the expanded cover-subtitle: “300 bars in 13 countries: one man’s quest for the meaning of beer.”

‘Just the one’ sets us up to how this all started for Pete. Locations are London and Prague. ‘Los Borrachos’ sees him in Barcelona and Madrid. The Czech Republic is the primary setting of ‘Where you find beer, there you find good life,’ including trips to Plzen* and Ceske Budjejovice*. If you haven’t picked up on it by now, the chapter titles are all things said in each respective area.

‘A hundred thousand welcomes’ has Pete traversing Ireland. ‘The smell of freshly poured beer is the smell of my country’ represents Belgium, and having lived there I’m not disagreeing. ‘Beervana’ “represents” the US (as well as any other set of 3-5 cities elsewhere) by hitting  Milwaukee, New York, and Portland, Oregon. Australia asks of him, ‘Mate, are you right?’ ‘Toriaezu birru’ covers Asia (Tokyo, Shanghai). The Oktoberfest (or Die Wies’n) is covered in ‘Countless thousands of fattened creatures…’. Scandinavia smirks at those ‘… making themselves objects of derision…’. England gets a bit of post-trip letdown coverage in ‘Wi’aht it, he’s miserable’.

I did really enjoy this but I took no notes. It’s also been a while since I read it. It reads much like a novel, though, so a leisurely reading is probably best for this type of book.

I got my copy at Powell’s in Portland while there for the Oregon Brewers Festival earlier this year; new $15.95 pbk.

Highly recommended.

27th OBF: a photo non-essay

This photo non-essay (as in pretty much no words except for captions) covers all three days I attended the 27th Oregon Brewers Festival at Gov. Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland, Oregon.

[Note: minor edit to fix misidentified Rogue character. Thanks, Jon! (see comment below)]

Day 1: Wed., 23 July

Oregon Brewers Festival sign as I approach the entrance to the fest.

Oregon Brewers Festival sign as I approach the entrance to the fest. 2:40 pm.

Saying Hi to festival friends - Ginger Johnson of Women Enjoying Beer http://womenenjoyingbeer.com/

Saying Hi to festival friends – Ginger Johnson of Women Enjoying Beer

Roaming musicians weren't going to let gray skies and rain dampen anyone's spirits.

Roaming musicians weren’t going to let gray skies and rain dampen anyone’s spirits.

Large amounts of rain? Who cares? The crowd fits fine under the big tents so is non-plussed. North tent. 3:49 pm

Large amounts of rain? Who cares? The crowd fits fine under the big tents so is non-plussed. North tent. 3:49 pm

Day 2: Thu., 24 July

Trailer 4 waiting on opening for Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker. 11:53 am

Trailer 4 waiting on opening for Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker. 11:53 am

(Some of) the Dutch brewers chatting with Art Larrance.

(Some of) the Dutch brewers chatting with Art Larrance. Yes, they really were constantly smiling the whole time. I’m not the only one who noticed either. 12:29 pm

People on the grounds of Oregon Brewers Festival and the Specialty Tent. 12:52 pm

People on the grounds of 27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival and the Specialty Tent. 12:52 pm

Tap locator sign in center of 27th annual OBF grounds. 12:58 pm

Tap locator sign in center of 27th annual OBF grounds. 12:58 pm

People under the North tent, I believe. 1:52 pm Have had tons of questions re crowds so here's some idea. Not bad at all.

People under the North tent, I believe. 1:52 pm Have had tons of questions re crowds so here’s some idea. Not bad at all.

Festival glass and both sides of the tokens.

Festival glass and both sides of the tokens.

Library Instruction West conference Portland Spirit voyagers group photo

Library Instruction West conference Portland Spirit voyagers group photo. This is simply to prove I was in Portland for (er, with) the librarians. Hi, lovely wife.

Day 3: Fri., 25 July

Books I was ogling and/or fondling at Powell's. Bickerdyke's The Curiosities of Ale and Beer.

Some of the books I was ogling and/or fondling at Powell’s. Bickerdyke’s The Curiosities of Ale and Beer.

Loftus' Sustainable Homebrewing

Loftus’ Sustainable Homebrewing

Fix's Principles of Brewing Science

Fix’s Principles of Brewing Science

Fisher & Fisher's The Homebrewer's Garden

Fisher & Fisher’s The Homebrewer’s Garden

Keeping Portland weird. The Rogue food vending stall side: Cut-out of Rogue head brewer John Maier's head and a cow with a bondage hood on a surfboard. Why not? 12:54 pm

Keeping Portland weird. The Rogue food vending stall: Cut-out of Rogue head brewer John Maier’s head and a cow with a bondage hood on a surfboard. Why not? 12:54 pm [edited to fix misattribution]

Crowd under tent on Day 3 at 2:33 pm

Crowd under tent and at beer lines, which are at worst 3-4 people deep, on Day 3 at 2:33 pm

I honestly never waited more than 2 minutes for a beer and the average was probably closer to 45 seconds, except for at the Specialty Tent. Even there I usually only had 4-6 people to stand behind. Sometimes none. Once I was about 12th in line and we waited for about 10 minutes but that was because it was just 2 pm and the daily specialty beers were a bit slow coming out. Nonetheless, several people were complaining. I had an extremely hard time refraining from kicking them in their shins.

OBF Beer Garden 2:56 pm

OBF Beer Garden 2:56 pm Day 3

Here ends my assorted babblings about the 27th Oregon Brewers Festival. It was my 1st OBF and I had a grand, and apparently tasty, time.

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap recap

Recap of my first Oregon Brewers Festival

Overall, Oregon Brewers Festival was great. I found it well run and everyone was upbeat. This was my 1st year attending and I was able to attend in the first couple of hours each day Wed.-Fri. So it was mostly relatively quiet for me.

Gripes for OBF

I have only two gripes overall. One of them, smoking, I addressed in my previous post. Probably not much can be done about it for a good while.

Drinking water is my second. There was plenty of rinse water at the fest, although all except the rinse station at the Specialty Tent had crappy water pressure/flow. Bottled water was available from assorted vendors and I bought mine from Rogue each day for $2/each. But honestly, $2 for a bottle of water is too much of a markup when every possible means to get people to also consume water should be the goal. Moreso if it is sunny and hot out. There is probably some agreement between the fest and vendors but perhaps the fest ought vend the water at $0.50 or even a dollar. That should make them a decent profit. I am truly grateful for the $2 bottles of water being available; I bought one every day I attended. I am particularly glad they weren’t priced like at the movie theater! But it is still a ridiculous markup when water consumption should be heavily encouraged.

Some may dismiss these gripes as small. I admit in ways they are. I doubt anything will or can be done easily in either case. It’s all good. I’m trying to spend a good bit of space and a lot of time to talk about my experience so I get a couple small gripes.

Props to OBF

At each of the trash / recycling areas the fest had volunteer Trash Talkers. I sadly got no good pictures; their shirts proudly proclaimed them to be from that rare breed the “Trash Talker:” people who help you by taking your assorted refuse and/or help you get it in the right bins. Some were willing to help educate and some just got the job done. I appreciated it and want to say “Kudos” to the Oregon Brewers Festival folks. Well-implemented.

More props to the Oregon Brewers Festival crew: 10 out of my 33 beers were rated highly by me. That is a 30% “success rate” (for my palate) for beers they brought to the fest. And it gets even better. Darn good job! [More info below.]

Stats, various, from my OBF 27 visit to Portland

  • Total # tried: 33 at fest (1 was a repeat from an earlier occasion); 5+ not at fest [fest: 14 day 1; 10 day 2; 9 day 3]
  • Int’l beers (at fest): 8 Netherlands; 1 Germany. (Out and about 3): 1 “Ireland”; 1 Germany; 1 Austrian Trappist
  • Special beers: 4; 1 of which was Canadian
  • Beers rated 4.5-5: 10. 30% “success rate.”

Top Beers

Top Beers (4.5+) = 10
It turns out there were ten beers which I gave a 4.5+ in Untappd so I will declare them my “top beers” (or “favorites,” if you insist) of OBF 27. There were two 5s and 8 4.5s. Of these 10, only one was a special beer and two were international. That means 70% of my top rated beers at OBF 27 were a single token each. That’s pretty good.

  • Dogfish Head Oak Aged Strong Ale (posing as “Shelter Pale Ale”) 5 “Amazing! My kind of old ale.”
  • Mazama El Duque do Porto 5 “Their Grand Cru from port barrels.” $
  • Sprecher Abbey Triple 4.5 “A tad sweet but otherwise amazing! Exceeded expectations and hopes. Aroma = heavenly.”
  • Deschutes Ester the Farmhouse Maiden 4.5 “Excellent.”
  • Bear Republic Grand Am APA 4.5 “Tasty.”
  • ‘T IJ Ijwit (Netherlands) missed checking in ? 4.5 “Damned tasty. Could use a tad more CO2. Very lightly spiced.” $
  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale 4.5 “A: pine and a lt fruitiness. C: sl hazy orange. Oh yeah.”
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel) 4.5 “A: lovely. Lt pear & some acidity. C: med hazy med yellow. I like this.”
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner 4.5 “I was skeptical of a NW Pilsner but damn fine job, Full Sail! Happy anniversary!”
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout 4.5 “A: cherry over roast malt. Vanilla w/hint of bourbon. Sweet finish w/choc/cocoa & cherry. Not as good as hoped.” $

Sara asked me on the drive home if I enjoyed it enough to make it a regular trip—we’re still trying to find and program in the fests we like—and I had to say no. If it worked out like this time where we were in Portland anyway, and relatively cheaply, and I could attend the same time of day. Sure! Otherwise not so much. I did say I would like to do the brunch and parade some year, but again I’d want all the other stipulations too. So maybe won’t happen any time soon. I did truly enjoy myself and can only imagine what it was like for those who couldn’t get there until the weekend. For me, it worked well.

Thanks, to the Oregon Brewers Festival crew and all volunteers, breweries, distributors, vendors and so on. Also, a big thanks to Art Larrance for bringing the Dutch and German brewers and their beer to the fest. Massive thanks to Chris Crabb and Jon Abernathy for getting me hooked up to go.

I have decided there will be one more post on Oregon Brewers Festival. It will consists mainly of a baker’s dozen or so pictures.

[Full disclosure: Oregon Brewers Festival provided me with a festival glass and 12 tokens for free. Thus I got in for free and had a couple free beers. Take that for what you will.]

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap day 3

Day 3: Fri, 25 July

I started this day feeling much better than the one before. Again, I had plenty of time to wander around. Having learned the evening before that I was only a dozen or less blocks from the heart of the Pearl district I headed down there. I tweeted to see what there was to do. [I full well know about Powell’s and was trying to avoid it.]

Got to Deschutes eventually. Not open.

A Twitter friend recommended Lovejoy Bakers so I found it and had 2nd breakfast there. It was indeed quite tasty and affordable.

Got the expected Powell’s response.


Being well fed I wandered around seeing assorted sights in the Pearl District with almost no one around. Kind of liberating. But also interesting things not yet open. Tried to avoid Powell’s while exploring a few streets / further than other times. Ended up there anyway. 

I headed straight to the beer / brewing section and had four books in my hand at one point but slowly narrowed it down to one, while chatting with a couple of guys. After getting in line I took the book I had chosen and put it back (is brand-new and was pricey) and settled on another. I ended up getting Pete Brown’s Three Sheets to the Wind based on one of the guys recommendations; plus, he’s a beer writer I am aware of but unfamiliar with.

Three Sheets to the Wind Three Sheets to the WindPete Brown; Pan Books 2007WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

After Powell’s I went back to Deschutes a couple minutes before opening. A crowd was beginning to form; lots of folks needing to kill an hour before OBF opened. I followed a guy in to the bar on opening and he asked me to join him. Nice guy; I liked him. We chatted a good bit. Wanting a pub beer, I had a small glass of Altnomah Falls. It was tasty enough. I gave it 3.5 stars. Also glad I had my Ester the Farmhouse Maiden at OBF as, at least at opening on Friday at the pub, it was no longer on tap. After ours beers, my new friend and I walked together to the fest. I left him at the glass & tokens tent and went after my first OBF beer of the day.

1st OBF beer of day: Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock.

Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock. 1st OBF beer of day 3 for me.

Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock. 1st OBF beer of day 3 for me.

Untappd data issues. I have been experiencing more and more things with bad/incomplete data. Much of it is “geographic”: Oregon breweries not in list of Oregon breweries; boats listed as such in FourSquare and Untappd not counting as such. There have been a few others lately too that I can’t think of currently.


Smoking on fest grounds?

I got an email that I got a response but I never saw (or could later find) the tweet in my timeline. Weird. Hmm. I think maybe it was pulled. I have the tweet text in the email but the gist is that “although we rent out the park it is still for the public.” I understand (legally). But I don’t want to.

Recreational usage.


Crowd navigation.

Humoring myself regarding Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout.


Last tokens.

After the fest I met Sara to visit the Portland Art Museum which was free that evening. Turns out it was still $5 each to see the special Tuileries exhibit but we willingly paid that and saw some interesting things throughout the museum.

Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Plaque for Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Plaque for Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

We headed downtown as Sara was after good beer choices. We tried to go to Bailey’s Taproom but it was stupid busy. We ended up around the corner and above them at their offshoot, The Upper Lip. I got a Maisel Weisse Original .3l and Sara got a very generous 4 oz pour each of Pelican Stormwatcher’s Winterfest and Stift Engelszell Benno Trappistenbier, which caused some serious confusion with identifying it. Turns out they had the right name but the wrong style listed. I wasn’t impressed with anything, although I think I definitely liked the Stormwatcher’s Winterfest more than I do Mother of All Storms. I was pretty burnt out on beer at that point.

Sitting at the Upper Lip this is what we saw out the window. I tweeted a snarky tweet regarding the “brewery fresh” light being off. Sara decided she was hungry and we should try going there. We got in right at the end of happy hour (6:59 pm) and after a taste or two we ordered the brown they had. We left 80% at the table when we were done eating. Guess I got repaid for being snarky. Or, I should have listened to myself. Food was pretty tasty, though.

Tugboat Anchor Tug (American brown)

Tugboat Anchor Tug (American brown)

While we were finishing up at Tugboat Sara was keeping an eye on Bailey’s Taproom. She finally saw an open table and ran across the street while I gathered up our stuff and came across more leisurely. She had a Mazama Nightside Eclipse. I had a few sips but I was basically done. I can now say I’ve been to Bailey’s Taproom but that was not my scene; at least not on a Friday evening, of OBF. I never even saw the tap list. Maybe I can drop by during a weekday next trip. [I see they open at noon. Thank you!]

Day 3 beers: Deschutes

  • Altnomah Falls 3.5

OBF

  • Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock 3.5 $
  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale 4.5 “A: pine and a lt fruitiness. C: sl hazy orange. Oh yeah.”
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel) 4.5 “A: lovely. Lt pear & some acidity. C: med hazy med yellow. I like this.”
  • Fort George The Optimist [2nd checkin – bad can] 4 “Nice. I could go for a bit more flowery/fruitiness but nice.”
  • Maximus Imperial Saison (Netherlands) 3.5 “Ok. Was hoping for more.” $
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner 4.5 “I was skeptical of a NW Pilsner but damn fine job, Full Sail! Happy anniversary!”
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout 4.5 “A: cherry over roast malt. Vanilla w/hint of bourbon. Sweet finish w/choc/cocoa & cherry. Not as good as hoped.” $
  • Central City (Surrey, BC) Bourbon Barrel-Aged Imperial Porter [not checked in] “A: bourbon; vanilla. C: Mostly opaque pomegrante-black. A tad thin.“$
  • De Molen Bommen & Granaten English Barleywine (Netherlands) 3.5 “A: Oh. My. C: dk amber. Sweet. Ok. Def malty but needs a tad more hops.”$

Upper Lip (Bailey’s Taproom)

  • Maisel Weisse Original 3
  • Stift Engelszell Benno Trappistenbier [Saison] 2.5

Tugboat

  • Anchor Tug (American brown) 2.5 [photo – left most]

Best beers of the day:

  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel)
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout

Day 3 ended fairly well. The next day we’d head home.

My next and last post in this series will cover my top-rated beers and one more small(?) gripe about the fest. See smoking above but realistically nothing can probably be done about that any time soon. There truly were not very many people smoking while I was there but then I went during the “quiet” times.

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap day 2

Day 2: Thu, 24 July

Thursday morning I was feeling the afternoon and evening before. Thanks to being an early riser I had plenty of time to wander Portland and nurse myself back in time for a noon opening. I got to the fest grounds about 11:50 am, got my wristband and headed to the tent with the Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker since so many people were talking about. I was a bit disappointed that there was no noon beer whistle but within a few minutes the “We’re pouring” call came.

I did not drink all of quite a few of my beers this day as my point was to try many and hopefully find a few I truly liked. My top ranked beers of the day were Bear Republic Grand Am APA, Mazama El Duque do Porto, and ‘t IJ Ijwit.

  • Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker 3.5 “Like a liquid Sweet Tart but finishes kind weak. Really not so puckery.”
  • Rodenburg Terra Incognito (Netherlands) 3 $
  • Nothhaft Rawetzer Zoigl Kellerbier (Germany) 4 “Bready and lightly sweet.” $
  • Rooie Dop The Daily Grind Coffee Porter (Netherlands) 3 “Ok” $
  • Bayern Amber 4 “More Märzen than amber but tasty”
  • Bear Republic Grand Am APA 4.5 “Tasty.”
  • Grain Station Brew Works Epernay Weiss 4 “Nice but a tad too grainy perhaps. Subtle flavors otherwise.”
  • Mazama El Duque do Porto 5 “Their Grand Cru from port barrels.” $
  • Oakshire Brewers Reserve 7 Anniversary Barrel-Aged Baltic Porter 3 “Tart cherries but a tad thin for a Baltic.” $
  • ‘T IJ Ijwit (Netherlands) missed checking in ? 4.5 “Damned tasty. Could use a tad more CO2. Very lightly spiced.” $

Got a little irate about the wrong mustard.

Portland Spirit

  • Widmer or Fort George Pils
  • Widmer Drop Top Amber 2.5 [ no credit for ship ]

        Thursday evening I took a dinner cruise on the Portland Spirit with the librarians of Library Instruction West conference. They had a couple Widmer beers and wine. I first grabbed the pilsner and when I went to verify if it was Collaborator Czech’d Out Pils or something else the barman told me it was Fort George and they hadn’t been able to get the Widmer. Um, OK. Maybe it was Fort George’s. Next I got a Drop Top Amber but I mainly checked it in to Untappd to get credit for having a beer on a boat but for some reason I did not even though the location says it was a boat.

Day 2 wrapped up nicely and I was in better shape than the previous night, thankfully.