Who you gonna invite? (The Session #118)

Stan Hieronymus of appellation beer, author of Brewing Local and For the Love of Hops, and the founder of The Session is hosting the 118th Session: He asks “If you could invite four people dead or alive to a beer dinner who would they be? What four beers would you serve?

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

The Session, or Beer Blogging Friday

This can go so many directions as there are very many scenarios I can imagine, so I am going to put forth a couple different ones here, seeing as they are all fantasy anyway.

As much as I was inspired by this, I also seriously struggled with writing it. Not sure what’s going on, but here it is, as it is.

Beer & Brewing #1

Jessica Boak – co-beer blogger extraordinaire at Boak & Bailey’s Beer Blog and co-author of Brew Britannia: the strange rebirth of British beer and Gambrinus waltz: German Lager beer in Victorian and Edwardian London

Ray Bailey – the other half of the dynamic B&B duo; see Jessica above

Jon Abernathy – friend and another extremely long-term beer blogger at The Brew Site and author of Bend Beer: A History of Brewing in Central Oregon

Peter Kopp – author of Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon’s Willamette Valley

I have been reading Boak & Bailey for a couple years now [blog, books, & newsletter] and interact with them a tad bit on Twitter too. They seem like good folks and ones I would love to actually have a chance to sit with in a pub and talk, so they are natural fits.

Seeing as they are somewhat fairly-to-heavily focused on the recent history of beer in Britain, I thought my friend, Jon Abernathy, would be an excellent choice due to his same focus on our local region.

A fourth here was tougher but I went with Peter Kopp as another historian of an aspect of beer production.

So I guess my theme here, if there is one, is authors of recent historically-focused books on beer.

The beers I would serve—I’m sure I could be swayed as my creativity here got exhausted quickly—are the following:

A lovely British cask bitter in perfect nick. Because. I have never had such a thing and I need the experience. What is all the fuss [SPBW, CAMRA, real ale, …] about?

Heineken (Dutch) c1984. While I was stationed in Belgium in the mid-80s one of my fellow soldiers—a Dutch airman—would bring me this by the case. I also drank Rodenbach—in 33 cl bottles—and a couple others by the case. This was so very different than the stuff imported in green bottles that I had been drinking 5 years earlier just before joining the Army and leaving for Europe. I would really love to taste this and see if it was as good as I remember it.

1842 Pilsner Urquell. Why would you not want to try the first—and only—Pilsner? What was this thing that so changed the world?

Thrales 18th century Russian Imperial Stout. The wife and I adore big Imperial stouts, so again I would love to try one of the early exemplars and possible eponym.

Women in Beer

I definitely would love to do my part for the many great women in and around great beer and there are so very many inspiring choices here. Sadly, my creativity was restrained here as there are no doubt many more amazing and interesting women in this field that I am not aware of.

Women in Beer #1

Tanya Cornett – R&D Brewer at 10 Barrel, former brewmaster at Bend Brewing

Tanya is a great brewer—I don’t care about your feeling re AB InBev here—and someone I’d love to get to know. One of my beer heroes  in my newly adopted hometown.

Carla Jean Lauter – “the beer babe,” beer writer, blogger, twitterer

Carla is always interesting on the Twitters and her longer form writing—when I get a chance to see it—is also. Another person from my corner of the interwebz that seems like a really cool person to hang with over some beers

Mirella Amato – beer educator, author of Beerology: everything you need to know to enjoy beer…even more and one of the first Master Cicerones

Again, another really cool seeming person whose passion is focused on beer education, something near and dear to my heart.

Annie Johnson – 2013 AHA Homebrewer of the Year

I read an article—somewhere—about Annie in the last couple years and maybe even saw a short video and she just seemed so interesting and enthusiastic.

So I have award-winning brewers, both professional and homebrewer, and a beer writer and a beer educator/author.

For the women in beer dinner I would want the ladies to each bring their own selection. This would (hopefully) be a dinner in which I, the host, would mostly sit in and listen. Keep my mouth shut as much as possible and allow them to discuss what they want, how they want.

Women in Beer (Science)

Veronica Vega – R&D Brewer for Deschutes Brewery

Karen Fortmann – senior research scientist at White Labs

Nicole Garneau – geneticist & curator at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science; coauthor of the Beer Flavor Map [see above link] [This is a bit breathless, to say the least, but gives an idea. Am immensely interested in discussing this with the coauthors.]

Lindsay Barr – sensory specialist at New Belgium; currently serves as chair of the ASBC Sensory Subcommittee; coauthor of the Beer flavor Map.

Veronica is one of my favorite people and another definite local hero of mine. I also know, for a fact, that she is an amazing person with a wide variety of interests and experience. I have been on a couple hikes with her—beer-related—and see her now and again at the pub or around town. I always get a hug. But please don’t let any of that distract you from her brewing chops—she has a much larger role now and well deserves it—but she was the Deschutes Bend Pub brewer when we moved here and is a major force in why I adore those pub beers so very much. I have drank quite a bit of her beer.

I read about Karen Fortmann in that Beer Advocate article and her work sounds absolutely intriguing.

The other two scientists, also mentioned in that article, came to my attention a few months back due to their work on the Beer Flavor Map. I have read Meilgaard’s work and others on the flavor wheel and find this [set of] topic[s] incredibly interesting. I would love to get a first-hand account of that work and the resultant product.

One professional brewer with a science background and three brewing scientists. This one would be extremely hard for me to be quiet so I would not hold myself to that here. Beer science. Got to learn. Got to ask questions of the researchers when you get a chance. Still, hopefully, not being a typical guy and letting the ladies have at it.

I would leave the beers up to the professionals, as above.

Growers / Researchers

Seth Klann – barley and rye grower, maltster Mecca Grade Estate Malt

Pat Hayes – OSU barley breeder

Gail Goschie – hop grower, Goschie Farms

Al Haunold – USDA hop breeder. Took over the hop breeding program in Corvallis (USDA-ARS) in 1965:  Nugget, Willamette, Cascade and several other hops are credited to him.

These people and their roles are critical to great beer! We need farmers–especially ones like Seth and Gail whose families have been farming in Oregon for over 100 years each. We also need our agricultural researchers and these two–at least in my world–are rock stars.

I do know Seth and Pat personally and they are both great people. I have had the privilege of attending OSU Barley Days with Pat playing host and another huge privilege of hanging on the Klann family farm for a a day during a homebrew club group brew and seeing the mechanical floor malter and the storage silos and so learning about all they do to bring us great malt. I have also heard both men present on barley a couple of times.

I do not know Gail personally but she seems like great people from all I have seen and heard. I never had the privilege of meeting Al Haunold either but in our little part of the world he is legendary.

For these folks I would love some vibrant, yet simple, SmaSH beers made with Mecca Grade malt [Full Pint, thanks Pat!] and Goschie Farms’ Haunold-developed hops.

Others

I had a couple other scenarios lined up but due to struggling with writing they need to be left out—there were plenty more women in beer, more growers and researchers, more beer writers, a foursome or three of library folks, homebrewing folks, beer education folks, and so on.

Deschutes Street Pub

Deschutes Street Pub may be coming to a city near you. Well, seven cities after its test run here in Bend May 9th. Between 30 May and 14 Nov it will visit Philadelphia, Arlington, VA, Cleveland, Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Denver and Sacramento.

Deschutes Street Pub logo

“We’re super excited to announce that we’re setting up shop in your town for one day! That’s right, we’re bringing our outdoor pub of epic proportions to each of the cities below for an all out block party. Crafted from reclaimed wood and steel, our Street Pub will be a one-stop-shop to try several of our beers – from the coveted Reserve Series rarities (think The Abyss) all the way to year-round favorites like Black Butte Porter and Mirror Pond Pale Ale. Pair those beers up with culinary creations from our Executive Chef, Jeff Usinowicz, and live local music – and you have a street party that’s truly “crafted for community.”

In each city we’ll partner with a local charity so you’ll be drinking for a good cause. The amount of money raised will be determined by how much beer we sell. So, grab your friends and check out the Street Pub when it rolls through your town.”

A fine companion to Woody but on another level [Woody events]. The Street Pub uses 4296 feet of reclaimed white oak and 10,000 pounds of steel. It has 40 taps, which is quite a bit more than the Bend Pub or the PDX Pub or the brewery. Wow! Other than that—which you can learn from watching the video—there are no details, just a fleeting glimpse.

Let’s just say that they have my attention and I hope to be at the May 9th Bend test run.

Schedule available here.

Deschutes Brewery Blog post, “Street Pub – Crafted for Community.”

“Virginia” beer

The wife and I spent a week recently in the Falls Church, Virginia area enjoying lots of beers; only some of these were from Virginia so I put “Virginia” in double quotes. We went for a memorial service for my niece who recently passed and with so much family together again we also celebrated Thanksgiving and my brother-in-law’s birthday on Dec. 1st. With so many relatives in one house, along with the stress of saying goodbye to a loved one, and multiple receptions, and … a lot of beer (and wine) was consumed.

My daughter and son-in-law picked us up at the airport Wednesday evening. We stopped at Dominion Wine & Beer @DominionWB in Falls Church, VA on the way to my sister’s house. Great selection and friendly people. They told us about a free tasting of big beers on Black Friday for the Bourbon County Brand Stout release and even had the bottles on the counter.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

We made sure to add it to our calendars.  The real beauty: it is about a 5-minute walk away from my sister’s place. We will definitely be visiting them whenever we make it back there. In fact, we visited 3 or 4 times in the week we were there.

Before we left Bend, Sara discovered that there is a Dogfish Head Alehouse in Falls Church so that was high on our list and we made it there Sun evening (30th). We also wanted to get to Spacebar, a specialty grilled cheese and tater tots craft beer bar, which we did Monday night.

I failed to checkin every beer in Untappd. I even failed to record/list every (unique) beer and also to take a picture of every one. Of course, some were duplicates and I didn’t want to check them in. Some I just missed.

This post is in 3 parts: commentary on the tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer; our 1st visit to a Dogfish Head Alehouse; and a list of the beers that I know I had, by day, as best as possible.

Dominion Wine & Beer BCBS Release Tasting

On Friday, my kids, their spouses, and Sara and I attended a tasting in conjunction with the Goose Island BCBS release at Dominion Wine & Beer. We got there a few minutes early and the place was packed and the tasting had already started. The gentleman pouring made sure to get us started at the beginning though. It was packed to the gills but everyone jostled along good-naturedly. I overheard the guy at the checkout telling someone that this is their biggest tasting by far; that most are far more manageable. Good to know. 😉

Let me just say that any tasting that begins with Epic’s Big Bad Baptist is something to not only behold but to be at. Seeing as we were going so big I only tried to grab an overall impression and didn’t write any tasting notes. These are the beers in the order we had them.

  • Epic Big Bad Baptist (Batch 40) [no checkin]
  • North Coast bbl-aged Old Rasputin 4.5
  • Stone Southern Charred 4.5
  • 3 Brothers Resolute 4.0
  • Avery Tweak 4.5
  • Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout 2014 4.5

As you can see I liked most of them well enough. 😉

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church, VA

Dogfish Head Alehouse of Falls Church, VA

Dogfish Head Alehouse of Falls Church, VA

Sunday evening found 9 of us heading to the Dogfish Head Alehouse in Falls Church (Mom, kids and spouses, sister and spouse, Sara and me). Sara and I were practically giddy. Overall our visit was excellent.

There were some issues with getting the correct beers in both of the premium flights ordered (Max and Sara) and the onion rings on two orders were cold. Our waitress, Marian, was most excellent. She got fresh hot onion rings for both and she tried to get the beer issues straightened out. Whoever was pouring was not on their game, that’s for sure. Possibly the wrong beer was on the wrong tap. Sara & Max both got 4-beer flights with one beer overlapping. That beer was different in both cases and was not the beer asked for. They were both replaced but the beers were still different (color, taste). Then Sara discovered her Palo Santo Marron was Chicory Stout. She doesn’t care for it and it is a standard beer compared to the premiumly-priced Palo Santo. Marian was horrified and was going to replace it but since I had a snifter of the Palo Santo we decided to just share that. We certainly had enough beer between us.

Heavenly snifter of draft Palo Santo Marron

Heavenly snifter of draft Palo Santo Marron

I did pull Marian aside and tell her that she was awesome as far as were were concerned. In the end, I also talked to the manager. I started by telling him Marian was “grace under pressure” and that we appreciated her. I also calmly let him know we had been having beer issues and that he might want to keep an eye on the bar tending. He was already on it since Marian had alerted him. He was grateful for the information and apologetic. My son grabbed the entire bill so I have no idea if either did anything with the bill. Nonetheless, everyone got at least as much (or more) beer as they ordered and everyone had plenty of tasty food.

I would be happy to go back as everyone we interacted with acted professionally and sometimes stuff just happens.

Beers consumed

[Note: except for 1-2 already at the house and those at Dogfish Head and at Spacebar, all beers were acquired from Dominion Wine & Beer. The ones already at the house may also have come from Dominion.]

26 Nov

  • Yuengling Traditional Lager 4.0
  • Dark Horse Too Cream Stout 4.0
  • Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout Unrated [late checkin]
Yuengling Traditional Lager

Yuengling Traditional Lager

Dark Horse Too Cream Stout

Dark Horse Too Cream Stout

Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout

Dark Horse One Oatmeal Stout

The Yuengling surprised me with how good it was. I would gladly drink several in the proper setting. The two Dark Horse stouts were fairly tasty.

27 Nov

  • Saison Dupont 5.0
  • The Duck Rabbit Milk Stout 4.5
  • Great Lakes Blackout Stout 4.0
  • Bells Two Hearted Ale 4.5
  • Brasserie d’Achouffe McChouffe 4.5
  • Dogfish Head Beer Thousand  4.5
  • Evil Twin Molotov Cocktail 4.0
  • Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine 4.0
  • Tröegs Troegenator 4.0 [late checkin]

Had a classic, Saison Dupont, as an opener and during my stint as a sous chef for others. Ended up drinking most of the bottle myself. I tried to share. Their loss.

04Bells 044

Bells Two Hearted Ale

d'Achouffe McChouffe

d’Achouffe McChouffe

Dogfish Head Beer Thousand

Dogfish Head Beer Thousand

07EvilTwin 047

Evil Twin Molotov Cocktail

Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine

Brouwerij Huyghe La Guillotine

Tröegs Brothers Troegenator

Tröegs Brothers Troegenator

28 Nov

  • Tröegs Troegenator [probably]
  • Epic Big Bad Baptist Batch 40 – seems no checkin [DominionWB tasting – see section above]
  • North Coast bbl-aged Old Rasputin 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Stone Southern Charred 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • 3 Brothers Resolute 4.0 [DominionWB]
  • Avery Tweak 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Goose Island Bourbon County 2014 4.5 [DominionWB]
  • Hardywood Virginia Blackberry 4.0
  • Sam Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock 2.5
Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Black Friday BCBS Release Tasting at Dominion Wine & Beer, Falls Church, VA. Consumed from left to right.

Hardywood Virginia Blackberry (Reserve Series)

Hardywood Virginia Blackberry (Reserve Series)

Samuel Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock

Samuel Adams Cherry Chocolate Bock

29 Nov

  • Schlafly Imp Stout, bourbon barrel-aged 4.5
  • Southern Tier Choklat – no checkin

Personally, I do not care for Choklat. At all. The wife does and bought this one. I think maybe she’s outgrowing her fondness for it. I hope.

Schlafly Imperial Stout 2013

Schlafly Imperial Stout 2013

Southern Tier Choklat

Southern Tier Choklat

30 Nov

Dogfish Head Alehouse

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church beer menu on 30 November 2014

Dogfish Head Alehouse, Falls Church beer menu on 30 November 2014

I had a small taste of both Firefly and American Beauty but wasn’t impressed enough to want a whole glass. So many other good choices. Went with the Palo Santo Marron, my first on draft. It was exquisite, of course.

FYI: The Core Beer Sampler is 6 4-oz pours of 60 Minute through Chicory Stout; the Premium Sampler is 4 4-oz pours of any four premium beers. The pours are quite generous and easily 5-oz each. I went for the snifter as I am a bit unhappy at the 50% increase in price along with a decrease of 33% in the amount of beer. That is quite significant and way beyond “premium.”

1 Dec

  • Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout – Tad thin but OK  3.0
  • Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA 4.5 [late checkin]
  • Peak Organic Winter Session Ale ME 5% 4.5 [Spacebar]
  • Terrapin Wake n Bake [Spacebar -Sara]
  • Blue Mountain Long Winters Nap Maibock VA 10% 4.0 [Spacebar -Sara]
  • Smuttynose Smuttonator Doppelbock NH 9.5% 4.0 [Spacebar -Sara]

I wish I had recognized that the KBBS was the one Brian Yaeger wrote about in Red, White, and Brew. Neither Sara or I were fans either way; it was pretty meh. I enjoyed the Face Plant.

It was too dark at Spacebar for photos. My Peak Organics Winter Session was quite tasty. I also enjoyed trying Sara’s Blue Mountain and Smuttynose. My son and his wife both got Deschutes Black Butte Porter.

ALLTECH Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout

ALLTECH Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Stout

Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA

Lost Rhino Face Plant IPA

2 Dec

None – travel day

Actually, I tried to get a beer in the Portland (OR) airport before our flight home to Redmond. Our little terminal even had a Laurelwood pub. But since the waitress could not answer what I considered a most basic question about a beer I left. I wanted to know whether the stout had coffee in it. She was apologetic that she didn’t know but that is irrelevant; it is polite but of no actual informational value. She also didn’t volunteer to check with anyone else.

I don’t know if those folks are airport concessionaires or actual Laurelwood employees but they were wearing Laurelwood attire. Protip: Educate your employees or people acting as employees. She lost you the sale of a pint and food. She also lost you the good will of a tired, pissed off traveler who came to you for respite and replenishment.

Recap

A lot of good beer was drunk, along with a bit of mediocre stuff. That’s the deal when being adventurous though.

We sent my daughter and son-in-law back home (they drove) with a 2013 The Abyss and a Black Butte Porter Reserve XXVI which I had checked on the way. They also took the small bottle of BCBS we bought at the tasting and a couple other things. We also left a few tasties for my sister and brother-in-law.

Thanks, northern Virginia (especially Dominion Wine & Beer) and thanks to the Virginia brewers/breweries for the actual VA beers we did have.

Upon arriving home just before midnight on Tuesday, we found a very wet box on the front doorstep. Pulling it inside and unwrapping it found–bedraggled but not frozen– two Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA bombers, a grapefruit, USB key and pint glass. It must have been delivered late in the day and, for once, everyone’s timing was good (except for the beautiful presentation which was a bit disturbed).

Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA package

Lompoc Pamplemousse Citrus IPA package

Bend’s “Healthy Beer Culture”

NB: This post is my entry in this quarter’s #beerylongreads, hosted by Boak & Bailey’s Beer Blog.

NB2: This post is a response to “SIGNS OF A HEALTHY BEER CULTURE?” at Boak & Bailey’s Beer Blog. That post is over a year old now but for some reason the other day I was attracted to exploring that question locally. How well does Bend and Central Oregon’s “healthy beer culture” meet their criteria?

Preliminaries

A couple of weeks ago (12 Nov), Boak and Bailey tweeted a link to an earlier post on healthy beer culture in response to The Beer Father’s “provocative post,” “Which Side Are You On?”

[One should check out both of those posts and their lengthy comments. There is some carping but there are a lot of valuable thoughts too.]

Here are the tweets for reference:

That last archive retrieval prompted by @TheBeerFather’s provocative post: http://t.co/iRIv8ObcJu

From the archive (October 2013): signs of a healthy beer culture http://t.co/ZENKHDnq2F

I saw a great reply to the “Which side are you on?” question. I thought it was good because it helped me formulate my thoughts, and more eloquently expressed them: that I’m not choosing a side and that I hope to avoid anyone who has chosen any side. Perhaps it was in one of those comments; I don’t remember.

I do place myself along a spectrum, one that is most likely multidimensional, and give myself permission to move around that space. Historically, my beer drinking shows that change happens in which beers I consume. I also recognize that people choose, and often even like, different things than me and that that is, and should be, beyond questioning.

This post though is to address how Bend does on this heuristic, or at least my little spot in Bend. Which means, your walkability and public transit options may well be different than mine or you may live farther from downtown.

First, their caveat:

“Perhaps inevitably, there’s an obvious UK-bias in the way we’ve approached this, and in how we’ve worded the list, although we did our best to avoid it. We’ve also used lots of deliberately vague terms — don’t ask us to define ‘decent’! (Or ‘beer culture’…)”

Bend and Central Oregon

Bend is a town of ~82,000 in the so-called High Desert of Oregon. Being in the eastern foothills of the Cascades we are in the rain shadow and thus get little precipitation. We do, though, have a couple beautiful rivers, including the Deschutes River which runs right through town. We have world-famous rock climbing formations nearby and many other outdoor recreational opportunities.

Bend started as a way point, then gained a few ranches, and then spent many decades with two huge lumber mills. That ended a couple decades ago and tourism, primarily outdoor tourism, has been king since. Currently, beer tourism is a significant and growing portion of local tourism dollars. Beer goes with everything that goes on here, indoors or out. We also host several international sporting events, mostly of various kinds of bicycle racing, but also skiing and so on. There are times of year when we have less visitors but we always have plenty of them.

This list of the region’s breweries [found in the sidebar] is the most accurate and up-to-date. You’ll see we’re pretty well set. [Note: those are breweries, most of which have a taproom also because … most are brewpubs.][If you are particularly interested in the history of brewing in this region, then notice also in the sidebar the book, Bend Beer: A History of Brewing in Central Oregon, recently written by Jon Abernathy and the compiler of that most helpful list.]

Of that list, and in my opinion:

One is not really in business and I’m not convinced it ever was although the wife and I poured two of their beers at our 1st Bend Brew Fest.  OK, they have a license and every once in a while one or two is available somewhere, either at a local homebrew club meeting or a fest. But there is nowhere one can go and get any of this brewery’s beer on a normal basis. I’ve heard rumor a brewery is being built. So I’ll back off and give them the status “brewery.” I’m just saying it doesn’t really meet my definition of an “active” brewery, let’s say. I’m good with it not meeting my own minimum requirement for what a brewery is but it does get listed most places, so be it. Hopefully they’ll get a better chance soon to show us what they can do.

Another should be self-respecting and admit it gave up on beer. That’s fine really, they do have pretty good food and they’ve always had guest taps. But if they were all guest taps they’d have to come off of the Bend Ale Trail and I do not believe they’d want that for business.

I learned on Veterans/Remembrance Day that Bend has a new one coming this month, Monkless Belgian Ales. Read about it at Jon’s blog [In fact, you can read that post and see the listing of Central Oregon breweries from the same link.]

Depending on who asks and who replies and why, this puts Bend at the top, or certainly in the top, of breweries per capita in Oregon. Which puts it up there, in the world. And it is all craft beer. Well, until recently perhaps. See #3 below.

Boak and Bailey’s Heuristic Answered, by me, for Central Oregon, and my spot in it

The numbered bold statements are Boak and Bailey’s with my answers beneath the respective “criteria.”

By the way, if you are asking who the heck are Boak & Bailey, they are a British beer blogging & tweeting, book authoring, couple whom I follow in those venues. I own the print book but haven’t had a chance to read it yet.

1. There is a drinking establishment within walking distance of where you live where you like to spend time, and which serves decent beer

Definitely! Several. Deschutes Bend Public House, Bend Brewing Co., many others.

2. If you are skint, there is an acceptable drinking establishment within walking distance which sells decent beer at ‘bargain’ prices.

Probably. JC’s, D and D, …

[Note: To better answer this question for myself, I am undertaking a (minimal) form of Jeff Alworth’s Dive Bar Challenge. I started compiling a list of Bend dive bars, but may also need to look a tad further around Central Oregon. Thanks, friends, for all the suggestions so far.]

I think the real concern for us here is the acceptability of establishments (to us)  and not the quality or availability of good beer cheap. This is not to say these are seedy or dangerous or anything; simply not our style of establishment. But we could.

Decided to poke Boak and Bailey on Twitter and asked for their opinion on prices for a pint out:

.@BoakandBailey Where are the price points for you moving from cheap but acceptable pint to next level to premium? Sorry for Americanisms. https://twitter.com/bythebbl/status/534008041138446338

@bythebbl if we’ve understood your question correctly, we’d consider c.£2.60 to be cheap, £3.40 to be standard, £4+ to be a bit pricey. https://twitter.com/BoakandBailey/status/534009373664608256

@bythebbl that’s for standard bitter in the pub. We’d expect (and be reasonably happy) to pay more for 330ml of interesting bottled beer. https://twitter.com/BoakandBailey/status/534009651973869569

[Can I just go on record and say how I would love to taste a proper “standard bitter” in a British pub.]

Based on Google Currency Converter 16 Nov 2014, c.£2.60 (cheap), £3.40 (standard), £4+ (bit pricey) equates to $4.07 / $5.33 / $6.27 for a pint at a pub. That cheap price is tough but doable on most nights of the week. The standard price is close to ours. I’d agree the “bit pricey” is getting up there, although I often pay it or more for a 10, 12 or 14 oz snifter of “something interesting,” bottles or otherwise.

I can definitely find a pint of good (if not great) beer at that standard price ($5.33) in most of the places in town. There will also be beer above that point in most of those places. That price does not always include tip though. [Sadly, our pint glasses are only 16 Imp. oz. and not proper pints.]

But based on all of the locals nights at the many brewpubs and bars you can make that lower price point somewhere most any night of the week. And you can definitely make it in places we just don’t want to frequent. Not bad places; just not our style. But the beer is almost guaranteed to be better than “decent.”

Also have not mentioned beer in growlers. For that see #9 below. That can often be quite inexpensive.

I could always go by Deschutes brewery and get 4 5-oz samples. Every day it is open. For free. I hope I don’t get that skint though. I enjoy driving past it in the roundabout and knowing that I could go taste some great beer for free. That knowledge just makes the world shine a little brighter.

So, this gets a definite yes.

3. If you fancy something special, there is a pub or bar within reach on public transport (WRPT) which sells imports and ‘craft beer’.

I still don’t understand the difference between “craft beer” in America versus in Britain, but in Bend it is all craft, which is a good thing here.

Alright, that claim can now possibly be challenged as 10 Barrel is about to be bought by Anheuser-Busch InBev and according to the Brewers Association they will no longer qualify as a “craft brewery.” But that is a trade organization definition versus what the people think. Time will tell.

As for imports, yes to both walking and public transit: The Brew Shop, Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café, Newport Avenue Market, The Wine Shop & Tasting Bar (downtown) along with a few more I imagine, Whole Foods, and several others.

For both of these, also see #9 below regarding growler fills.

Definite yes.

4. The nearest town/city centre has a range of pubs serving different demographics, and offering between them a range of locally-produced beers alongside national brands.

Definitely. At least you can find national brands in a few places.

[Opinion: By the way, there are not too many “national brands” in the US anymore, as the ones most would think of belong to international conglomerates. People might call Budweiser a U.S. national brand but that’s crazy. The ones that come the closest are still, by Craft Brewers Association criteria, craft breweries; Boston Beer Co., Sierra Nevada, and a few others. A few like Stone and Deschutes are rapidly getting there.]

5. There is a well-established family/regional brewery.

Deschutes Brewery. Something like 6th largest craft brewery in US and 11th largest brewery in the US. Pretty well-established; since 1988. [#s vary depending on when/who you ask/how you look.]

6. There are several breweries founded since 1975.

Every last one of the 27 or so in our little region are from after 1975; the first, Deschutes, was in 1988.

I am unsure whether this  lack of older breweries is supposed to count against us regarding our “healthy beer culture.” I certainly don’t think so. This region had no breweries between 1906 and 1988; at least as current history stands. Some of my big questions in life lately center around this. Why no brewery in region before 1905? Why none between 1906 and 1916 when the state went to Prohibition? Why none after until 1988? That last one is the easiest but still.

I am not in any way against older breweries, we just don’t have any and I’m not holding it against us. [In fact, I respect old breweries. When they deserve/d it. Just like with a newer brewery.]

7. There is at least one brewery founded since 2005.

Since 2005? Well over half of them; or, more specifically, #6 through #21, and the one that has closed. Almost 3/4 of them have been founded since 2005.

8. There is a regional speciality — a beer people ‘must drink’ when they visit.

Perhaps not one, but Boneyard RPM IPA [Beer Advocate / ratebeer], Deschutes Black Butte Porter [Beer Advocate / ratebeer], at the very least. This one may not be a big plus for us but either I’m treating “specialty” far too narrowly, or few regions have such a thing. If the first clause is correct then I’d add The Abyss, Black Butte Porter Reserve, one of Tonya Cornett’s Crush beers, and so many more.

9. There is an independent off licence (‘bottle shop’) WRPT.

Looked up “off licence” but not exactly sure about the “independent” part. We have several [most of the places mentioned in 3 above] and one (beer, cider) bottle shop within walking distance. We also have a liquor store within walking distance. Been there once to get the wife some whiskey for her sore throat hot toddy. I would consider most of them independent.

Growlers, which were mentioned a couple times above, serve a big role in our beer ecosystem. Witness the plethora—which only continues to swell—for new forms/shapes/materials that they come in. Commonly 64 oz (1/2 gal) and 1.5 l, they come in other sizes also, which seems to perhaps depend somewhat on region of the US. We also have growlettes here, which are generally 32 oz or 2 pints. Great beers the equivalent of a “standard bitter” can be had for $8 a growler. Yes, some are more but many are close to this price point. That’s four (US) pints at $2 each. If we only consider proper 20 oz pints as would be served in England then we would get 3 1/8 pints out of it. That gives us a $2.56/20 oz pint cost.

We have at least eight growler fill stations, probably 1.5-2x that, in Bend and Central Oregon. If you add in all of the breweries/brewpubs that fill them your choices to purchase great beer affordably are greatly multiplied.

I put them here since they are for take-away. Of course, here there is little to no assumption that you are taking them home; you may be taking them to a party (anywhere), on the Cycle Pub, camping, hiking, or whatever.

10. There is a shop selling home brewing supplies WRPT.

The Brew Shop, which is a combined homebrew supply store and bottle shop, along with The Platypus Pub in the basement, is easily within walking distance. We have to cross one of the worst intersections in town but it’s a 5-minute walk.

11. There is at least one beer festival in the region.

We have several beer festivals in the region. The biggest is the Bend Brewfest in August every year, then probably The Little Woody Barrel and Wood-Aged Brew and Whiskey Fest at the end of Sep/beg of Oct. We also have the Sisters Fresh Hop Fest, and there have been several other smaller beer fests that may or may not be recurring. But there will be more.

Then there is Central Oregon Beer Week—in its 3rd year this year—which is 9-days in May given over to the region to celebrate its own beer. We, indeed, have much to celebrate.

Some additions that point to a healthy beer culture here:

Central Oregon Homebrewers Organization (COHO): We have a large and fairly active, local homebrewing club. The wife and I are members, although so far I have only helped a friend brew once or twice. I also took a class on all-grain brewing from one of COHO’s officers at which we brewed, of course. And I have been a judge this year and the last at the annual BJCP homebrew competition they hold.

Boak & Bailey asked about homebrew shops in #10 so I assume homebrewing is important. Since not everyone joins an organization—I have several friends who are big homebrewers who aren’t members—this seems a reasonable indicator that the homebrewing culture is healthy here; or, at least, tending that way.

Central Oregon Beer Angels (COBA): This is also a reasonable indicator of the health of our beer culture, I would argue. An organization of over 300 local women “who love all things beer.” My wife and several of our friends are members. I know quite a few of their board members. And I have poured beer for them at an annual party. Biased? Anyway.

Large groups of women enjoying beer sounds like a healthy culture to me.

There are other groups, both organized and not, that do tastings and bottle shares; e.g., a couple through MeetUp.

Access to our brewers: We have incredible access to some amazing brewers. I have seen them, met them, talked to them at breweries, festivals, tastings, beer dinners, educational events, pairings, and so on. I have even gone on a hike with one of my favorites. I met Darin & Meghann Butschy of Oblivion Brewery at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café on the day they sold their 1st keg because I was hanging out in my local of an afternoon.

We know, or can fairly easily come to know, the folks who brew our beer in this town. That should count for something. Perhaps it isn’t required but it matters.

Wrap-up:

So, I think the answers pretty much tilt in our favor as to having a healthy beer culture. Certainly by this heuristic.

I know there were several posts, at least, in response to Boak & Bailey’s post but this is the one I found and read: a specific reply to Bailey by Leigh Linley at The Good Stuff, as applied to Leeds, England.

No doubt somebody would quibble about my not penalizing Bend for not having a brewery prior to 1975, and someone could argue we have no regional specialty, and so on. How much does that mark us down? Are we going to start rating places by this (It is not a scale). I hope not. And I imagine Boak & Bailey would be horrified if people did.

But I think it provides a great springboard to consider your own regional “healthy beer culture.” Or other regions, but only for benevolent purposes. 😉

Let’s start a conversation about “healthy beer culture” in Central Oregon

So Bendites, Bend lovers, Bend visitors: What do you think? Do we have a “healthy beer culture” in Bend? What’s missing? What is “unbalanced” in your opinion? Did I just completely mess it up? Do we have a regional specialty?

Please comment here or write your own blog post or Facebook post or what have you and link back here. Then please comment with a link to whatever you wrote. If you prefer not to make it public, then feel free to email me or otherwise. If you know me you can find me.

I have some views. We have some flaws and weaknesses in our beer culture. All-in-all, though, it is simply amazing. That leaves an awful lot to discuss, including what both of those refer to.

I would love to see a larger conversation about our beer culture in Bend and Central Oregon. [I just worry that I am not the one to be the driver at this time as only my close friends know I am having some still undiagnosed health issues. No one should worry but it affects my productivity, my focus and thinking, and I must “keep calm and carry on” or things get painful quickly in my head.]

Nonetheless, let’s take this where we may Central Oregonians. And of course, anyone else is welcome to join in regarding any larger points not specific to our region. For example, should we be penalized for not having older breweries and, if so, why?

Digital Writing Month 2014

As I mentioned on my other blog, habitually probing generalist, I have committed to participating in Digital Writing Month 2014, more commonly known as DigiWriMo, this November. If you are at all interested in what it is please check out the post I mentioned.

What does it mean for here? Well, hopefully some more posts. Some book reviews would be nice [many books have been read], maybe some more essay-like thoughts. I intend to participate in The Session #93 on beer travel.

You may see #digiwrimo in my tweets if you follow me on Twitter. But I’m guessing most of my beer tweets won’t.

If any of you are participating in some kind of writing month in November let me know if you would like some support and hopefully we can find a mutual venue.

Cicerone Certification Program [series] : General/CBS [1]

A couple weeks back, in a post where I noted that I passed my Cicerone Program Certified Beer Server test (16 July 2014; my profile page), I committed to writing a series of posts on the Cicerone Certification Program.

This is what I wrote:

I hope to write a couple posts in a small series on the Cicerone Certification Program and changes they just made and are facing, what they recommend for studying for the CBS and what I did for studying, some thoughts on their recommendations for studying for the Certified Cicerone test, some extractions from yesterday’s #RoadtoCicerone #beerchat on Twitter and, finally, what I have been planning for studying beer styles with friends.”

I did write the #RoadtoCicerone Twitter chat post

Series Introduction

This series should be 3-4 posts long: this one for intro and 1st level, another for Certified Cicerone, and one or two more for the 3rd level and alternatives/other certification programs. I may have more posts at some point about studying for the exams.

This post will cover the following, along with covering the Cicerone Program Certified Beer Server (Level I).

  • Intro
    • What it is
    • Levels

For each level the following will be covered:

  • Level – URL
    • what will be learned
      • syllabus (pdf) – URL
    • intended audience
    • costs
    • time frames
    • what is needed : books, computer, a/synchronous
      • Beer
      • Free study links
      • Books
      • Other stuff
    • Extra stuff / Miscellaneous

Introduction to the Cicerone Certification Program

What it is

What the program does: certification, education, assessment.

“The Cicerone Certification Program certifies and educates beer professionals in order to elevate the beer experience for consumers.” (Cicerone site)

“… the Cicerone Certification Program has become the industry standard for identifying those with significant knowledge and professional skills in beer sales and service. The Cicerone Certification Program offers independent assessment and certification so that industry professionals—as well as consumers—can be sure of the knowledge and skills possessed by current and prospective beer servers.” (Why Cicerone?)

The primary content of the program and its levels:

“The Cicerone Certification Program seeks to ensure that consumers receive the best quality beer at every service occasion. To facilitate this, those who sell and serve beer need to acquire knowledge in five areas:

  • Beer Storage, Sales and Service
  • Beer Styles and Culture
  • Beer Tasting and Flavors
  • Brewing Ingredients and Processes
  • Pairing Beer with Food

To encourage participation by those with various interests and ambitions, the program offers three levels of certification beginning with the simplest and building to the most complex and demanding:

  •      Certified Beer Server
  •      Certified Cicerone®
  •      Master Cicerone®” (Why Cicerone?)

Levels

So these are your 3 levels in the Cicerone Certification Program:

  •      Certified Beer Server
  •      Certified Cicerone®
  •      Master Cicerone®

If you wanted one

There are currently 7 Master Cicerones, 1544 Certified Cicerones and about 40,095 Certified Beer Servers listed in the roster.

Comments

Beer

Every level requires access to beer in many different styles, with the number of styles to be known increasing with each level. It is possible that you may already have a lot of this knowledge but unlikely you have it all at immediate recall. Technically, you don’t need to drink any beer for the Certified Beer Server level—as there is no tasting component on the exam (all online)—but it helps. There will be plenty of questions that, while requiring factual (and a little theoretical) knowledge, are answered best from experiential knowledge. Well, truly best would be experiential (tasting) knowledge strengthened by simultaneously studying and evaluating using the Cicerone Certification Program framework for beer styles. This is quite possibly the lengthiest part of studying, at least for the Certified Beer Server exam.

Cicerone Certification Program beer styles schema

The Cicerone Certification Program uses the same schema/format/classification for all levels of certification. They use the (BJCP style guidelines) for ABV and SRM number ranges for each style, and they use their own word-based scales for Color, Perceived Bitterness and ABV. You best learn both ways of referring to bitterness and color.

Assorted

Every level has its own syllabus, which is freely available, which you will also need. More resources are needed as you go up in levels. Of course, this also depends on how much prior knowledge/experience you have with the covered topics. There are also optional study materials/opportunities available from the Cicerone Certification Program that you can shell out for. It makes sense in some cases. I discuss it a bit below.

Professional qualifications

These are considered to be professional certifications and are priced accordingly. Cicerone.org is on record as stating that generally an employer is contributing something towards certification for their employee. Perhaps. Except when not. I discussed this a bit more with Cicerone.org via Twitter which you can see and read more of my comments at my Twitter Road to Cicerone #beerchat post.

Next I will cover the first level, which is the one I am certified at.

Cicerone Program Certified Beer Server (Level I)

What will be learned

“The Certified Beer Server requires competent knowledge of beer storage and service issues as well as modest knowledge of beer styles and culture and basic familiarity with beer tasting and flavors and basic knowledge about brewing process and ingredients. Knowledge of the Cicerone Certification Program’s levels and titles is also required.” (CBS page)

Syllabus (pdf) can be found here. This is only the outline. The full syllabus continues for nine more pages.

  • I. Keeping and Serving Beer
    • A. Purchasing and accepting beer
    • B. Serving alcohol
    • C. Beer storage
    • D. Draft systems
    • E. Beer glassware
    • F. Serving bottled beer
    • G. Serving draft beer
  • II. Beer Styles
    • A. Understaning beer styles
    • B. Style parameters
    • C. History, characteristics, and flavor attributes of styles by region
  • III. Beer Flavor and Evaluation
    • A. Taste and flavor
    • B. Identify normal flavors of beer and their source
    • C. Off-flavor knowledge
  • IV. Beer Ingredients and Brewing Processes
    • A. Ingredients
  • V. Pairing Beer with Food

Intended audience

“First-level certification exam for those who work with beer.” (CBS page) Since the Certified Cicerone is for “mature beer professionals” according to the founder, Ray Daniels, then I assume the Certified Beer Server is for not-yet mature beer professionals. Daniels asks “Can you think of anyone who should have a better knowledge of beer and its service than a beer writer?” and reminds us he started as a beer writer [See #RtC chat post]. 

So definitely beer servers, beer writers, folks in the industry aspiring to be “mature beer professionals.” Of course, these folks perhaps should be on their way to the Certified Cicerone. Bar/brewpub/microbrewery/etc. owners and managers. Wait staff. I imagine the case could be made for others. What do you folks think? [See more thoughts below at 3.7.2]

Costs

Exam alone: $69 USA, $79 International.

Exam format

“60-question multiple choice exam, administered online. A grade of 75% is required to pass. Candidates must also pass a short quiz about the Cicerone program. Each payment allows you 2 attempts to achieve a passing score.”

Time frame

Based on how much you already know about beer, styles and brewing, etc. it should only take a couple months of studying to be ready for the Certified Beer Server exam. Notice that the optional BeerSavvy online training gives you access for 90-days so they seem to think that’s about the right amount.

What is needed

  • No prerequisites.
  • Beer – this is needed at every level, unless you are already an expert on styles and your knowledge can be expressed in the schema they use to describe them (a combination of their own and BJCP).
  • Free study links – The Cicerone Certification Program provides some useful study links (yes, some of these are dubious/broken and I hope they update this document soon. I may well comment on these and suggest some alternatives in the future.)
  • Randy Mosher (2009). Tasting beer. Storey Pub.  [ My review ] – This book is pretty much mandatory. If not the primary reference source (the syllabus, probably) then it is the next most valuable. Read this book. A couple of times. I have. And will again.
  • Internet connected computer and an hour to take the test

Additional non-mandatory resources:

  • Cicerone Certification Program Beer Styles Profiles Card Sets. I have a set of these and they are great. They do contain every style on the Certified Beer Server exam.  although there may be some slight confusion: Imperial stout is listed in the American styles – Modern section of the CBS syllabus, while the card is Russian Imperial Stout and is in the British styles section. For the Certified Cicerone exam Imperial Stout is listed under both British – English – Dark Ales and American – Modern, but I am not sure whether they are considered equivalent for the exam. I’ll have more to say about these in the next post regarding the Certified Cicerone exam.
  • BeerSavvy from the Cicerone Certification Program

    “An online eLearning program covering beer flavor, service and styles in sufficient depth to prepare candidates for the Certified Beer Server exam. Study aids such as a downloadable flashcard file are included.”

    • $199 but includes CBS exam; “gives one person access to the streaming educational content for 90 days from the date of purchase.” (BeerSavvy)
    • Requires an Internet-connected computer
  • Some additional educational resources recommended by the Cicerone Certification Program. There are plenty of other potential resources also. Some a little less pricey.

Comments

BeerSavvy

I have no comment on the BeerSavvy online learning as I did not use it. If you are pressed for time and have limited capacity (for whatever reason) to compile your own study resources and guide your own studying then it may make good sense. There are possibly a few other cases where it makes sense. You are effectively spending $130 for training. I have no idea how long it takes to go through it once but it is probably faster than doing a lot of studying on your own.

Who do I think it is for?

This seems to me a very relevant question. I may (or may not) fit the standard idea of who should take the Certified Beer Server exam. I think I fit just fine, though. The larger question will be am I “in the mold” for the Certified Cicerone exam? Perhaps not. Yet. Maybe never.

Pretty much everybody in the beer industry, from all aspects of a brewery’s operations, to distributors, on to the retail service end, ought have the knowledge required of a Cicerone Program Certified Beer Server. Many of those do not actually need to be certified though.

I see certification—at some level and from some organization—becoming more important. It will mean more in much larger cities, particularly with trendy bars and dining experiences more readily available. It will also become increasingly important in real craft beer towns like ours, Bend, OR, and others. People who know (and appreciate) beer will want those serving them, slinging it around (distribution of whatever kind), and those producing the beer to also be reasonably educated regarding beer. It is hard to say how much certification will matter in the future as there are too many unknowns and too many different beer scenes. I do think demand will greatly increase though.

Another source of folks to pursue these qualifications, even if they are “professional” certifications, are assorted hobbyists like me. Whether homebrewer, blogger, beer geek who wants to know more, or some other person, there are plenty of folks who are willing to learn and to pay for these professional certifications. This diverse group is clearly not any of these organizations primary market but they underestimate them to their own detriment.

If industry is going to begin requiring that servers and others become professionally certified then there must be a pay off for the industry. The easiest way that I see to drive that is to get consumers to care whether or not those responsible for providing and/or serving them beer are certified are or not. If it makes no matter, who will pay for training/certification, and why?

I think encouraging folks, like me (and not like me)—hobbyists, if you must—would help spread the word about the value of this sort of certification for the general consumer. I am most definitely a very-well educated, and certified, consumer of beer. There. I said it.

But there is always more to learn.

Previous posts

Wrap-up

This post provided a general intro to the Cicerone Certification Program and covered the 1st level, the Certified Beer Server. This is the level at which I am certified and the only one I am qualified to answer questions about the experience of studying and testing. But I can still provide answers to many questions on the next two levels and indicate where to get more. Next up will be a post on the Certified Cicerone.

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap recap

Recap of my first Oregon Brewers Festival

Overall, Oregon Brewers Festival was great. I found it well run and everyone was upbeat. This was my 1st year attending and I was able to attend in the first couple of hours each day Wed.-Fri. So it was mostly relatively quiet for me.

Gripes for OBF

I have only two gripes overall. One of them, smoking, I addressed in my previous post. Probably not much can be done about it for a good while.

Drinking water is my second. There was plenty of rinse water at the fest, although all except the rinse station at the Specialty Tent had crappy water pressure/flow. Bottled water was available from assorted vendors and I bought mine from Rogue each day for $2/each. But honestly, $2 for a bottle of water is too much of a markup when every possible means to get people to also consume water should be the goal. Moreso if it is sunny and hot out. There is probably some agreement between the fest and vendors but perhaps the fest ought vend the water at $0.50 or even a dollar. That should make them a decent profit. I am truly grateful for the $2 bottles of water being available; I bought one every day I attended. I am particularly glad they weren’t priced like at the movie theater! But it is still a ridiculous markup when water consumption should be heavily encouraged.

Some may dismiss these gripes as small. I admit in ways they are. I doubt anything will or can be done easily in either case. It’s all good. I’m trying to spend a good bit of space and a lot of time to talk about my experience so I get a couple small gripes.

Props to OBF

At each of the trash / recycling areas the fest had volunteer Trash Talkers. I sadly got no good pictures; their shirts proudly proclaimed them to be from that rare breed the “Trash Talker:” people who help you by taking your assorted refuse and/or help you get it in the right bins. Some were willing to help educate and some just got the job done. I appreciated it and want to say “Kudos” to the Oregon Brewers Festival folks. Well-implemented.

More props to the Oregon Brewers Festival crew: 10 out of my 33 beers were rated highly by me. That is a 30% “success rate” (for my palate) for beers they brought to the fest. And it gets even better. Darn good job! [More info below.]

Stats, various, from my OBF 27 visit to Portland

  • Total # tried: 33 at fest (1 was a repeat from an earlier occasion); 5+ not at fest [fest: 14 day 1; 10 day 2; 9 day 3]
  • Int’l beers (at fest): 8 Netherlands; 1 Germany. (Out and about 3): 1 “Ireland”; 1 Germany; 1 Austrian Trappist
  • Special beers: 4; 1 of which was Canadian
  • Beers rated 4.5-5: 10. 30% “success rate.”

Top Beers

Top Beers (4.5+) = 10
It turns out there were ten beers which I gave a 4.5+ in Untappd so I will declare them my “top beers” (or “favorites,” if you insist) of OBF 27. There were two 5s and 8 4.5s. Of these 10, only one was a special beer and two were international. That means 70% of my top rated beers at OBF 27 were a single token each. That’s pretty good.

  • Dogfish Head Oak Aged Strong Ale (posing as “Shelter Pale Ale”) 5 “Amazing! My kind of old ale.”
  • Mazama El Duque do Porto 5 “Their Grand Cru from port barrels.” $
  • Sprecher Abbey Triple 4.5 “A tad sweet but otherwise amazing! Exceeded expectations and hopes. Aroma = heavenly.”
  • Deschutes Ester the Farmhouse Maiden 4.5 “Excellent.”
  • Bear Republic Grand Am APA 4.5 “Tasty.”
  • ‘T IJ Ijwit (Netherlands) missed checking in ? 4.5 “Damned tasty. Could use a tad more CO2. Very lightly spiced.” $
  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale 4.5 “A: pine and a lt fruitiness. C: sl hazy orange. Oh yeah.”
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel) 4.5 “A: lovely. Lt pear & some acidity. C: med hazy med yellow. I like this.”
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner 4.5 “I was skeptical of a NW Pilsner but damn fine job, Full Sail! Happy anniversary!”
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout 4.5 “A: cherry over roast malt. Vanilla w/hint of bourbon. Sweet finish w/choc/cocoa & cherry. Not as good as hoped.” $

Sara asked me on the drive home if I enjoyed it enough to make it a regular trip—we’re still trying to find and program in the fests we like—and I had to say no. If it worked out like this time where we were in Portland anyway, and relatively cheaply, and I could attend the same time of day. Sure! Otherwise not so much. I did say I would like to do the brunch and parade some year, but again I’d want all the other stipulations too. So maybe won’t happen any time soon. I did truly enjoy myself and can only imagine what it was like for those who couldn’t get there until the weekend. For me, it worked well.

Thanks, to the Oregon Brewers Festival crew and all volunteers, breweries, distributors, vendors and so on. Also, a big thanks to Art Larrance for bringing the Dutch and German brewers and their beer to the fest. Massive thanks to Chris Crabb and Jon Abernathy for getting me hooked up to go.

I have decided there will be one more post on Oregon Brewers Festival. It will consists mainly of a baker’s dozen or so pictures.

[Full disclosure: Oregon Brewers Festival provided me with a festival glass and 12 tokens for free. Thus I got in for free and had a couple free beers. Take that for what you will.]

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap day 3

Day 3: Fri, 25 July

I started this day feeling much better than the one before. Again, I had plenty of time to wander around. Having learned the evening before that I was only a dozen or less blocks from the heart of the Pearl district I headed down there. I tweeted to see what there was to do. [I full well know about Powell’s and was trying to avoid it.]

Got to Deschutes eventually. Not open.

A Twitter friend recommended Lovejoy Bakers so I found it and had 2nd breakfast there. It was indeed quite tasty and affordable.

Got the expected Powell’s response.


Being well fed I wandered around seeing assorted sights in the Pearl District with almost no one around. Kind of liberating. But also interesting things not yet open. Tried to avoid Powell’s while exploring a few streets / further than other times. Ended up there anyway. 

I headed straight to the beer / brewing section and had four books in my hand at one point but slowly narrowed it down to one, while chatting with a couple of guys. After getting in line I took the book I had chosen and put it back (is brand-new and was pricey) and settled on another. I ended up getting Pete Brown’s Three Sheets to the Wind based on one of the guys recommendations; plus, he’s a beer writer I am aware of but unfamiliar with.

Three Sheets to the Wind Three Sheets to the WindPete Brown; Pan Books 2007WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder 

After Powell’s I went back to Deschutes a couple minutes before opening. A crowd was beginning to form; lots of folks needing to kill an hour before OBF opened. I followed a guy in to the bar on opening and he asked me to join him. Nice guy; I liked him. We chatted a good bit. Wanting a pub beer, I had a small glass of Altnomah Falls. It was tasty enough. I gave it 3.5 stars. Also glad I had my Ester the Farmhouse Maiden at OBF as, at least at opening on Friday at the pub, it was no longer on tap. After ours beers, my new friend and I walked together to the fest. I left him at the glass & tokens tent and went after my first OBF beer of the day.

1st OBF beer of day: Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock.

Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock. 1st OBF beer of day 3 for me.

Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock. 1st OBF beer of day 3 for me.

Untappd data issues. I have been experiencing more and more things with bad/incomplete data. Much of it is “geographic”: Oregon breweries not in list of Oregon breweries; boats listed as such in FourSquare and Untappd not counting as such. There have been a few others lately too that I can’t think of currently.


Smoking on fest grounds?

I got an email that I got a response but I never saw (or could later find) the tweet in my timeline. Weird. Hmm. I think maybe it was pulled. I have the tweet text in the email but the gist is that “although we rent out the park it is still for the public.” I understand (legally). But I don’t want to.

Recreational usage.


Crowd navigation.

Humoring myself regarding Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout.


Last tokens.

After the fest I met Sara to visit the Portland Art Museum which was free that evening. Turns out it was still $5 each to see the special Tuileries exhibit but we willingly paid that and saw some interesting things throughout the museum.

Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Plaque for Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

Plaque for Hercules Battling Achelous as Serpent, 1824.

We headed downtown as Sara was after good beer choices. We tried to go to Bailey’s Taproom but it was stupid busy. We ended up around the corner and above them at their offshoot, The Upper Lip. I got a Maisel Weisse Original .3l and Sara got a very generous 4 oz pour each of Pelican Stormwatcher’s Winterfest and Stift Engelszell Benno Trappistenbier, which caused some serious confusion with identifying it. Turns out they had the right name but the wrong style listed. I wasn’t impressed with anything, although I think I definitely liked the Stormwatcher’s Winterfest more than I do Mother of All Storms. I was pretty burnt out on beer at that point.

Sitting at the Upper Lip this is what we saw out the window. I tweeted a snarky tweet regarding the “brewery fresh” light being off. Sara decided she was hungry and we should try going there. We got in right at the end of happy hour (6:59 pm) and after a taste or two we ordered the brown they had. We left 80% at the table when we were done eating. Guess I got repaid for being snarky. Or, I should have listened to myself. Food was pretty tasty, though.

Tugboat Anchor Tug (American brown)

Tugboat Anchor Tug (American brown)

While we were finishing up at Tugboat Sara was keeping an eye on Bailey’s Taproom. She finally saw an open table and ran across the street while I gathered up our stuff and came across more leisurely. She had a Mazama Nightside Eclipse. I had a few sips but I was basically done. I can now say I’ve been to Bailey’s Taproom but that was not my scene; at least not on a Friday evening, of OBF. I never even saw the tap list. Maybe I can drop by during a weekday next trip. [I see they open at noon. Thank you!]

Day 3 beers: Deschutes

  • Altnomah Falls 3.5

OBF

  • Duits & Lauret Kiem Helles Bock 3.5 $
  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale 4.5 “A: pine and a lt fruitiness. C: sl hazy orange. Oh yeah.”
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel) 4.5 “A: lovely. Lt pear & some acidity. C: med hazy med yellow. I like this.”
  • Fort George The Optimist [2nd checkin – bad can] 4 “Nice. I could go for a bit more flowery/fruitiness but nice.”
  • Maximus Imperial Saison (Netherlands) 3.5 “Ok. Was hoping for more.” $
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner 4.5 “I was skeptical of a NW Pilsner but damn fine job, Full Sail! Happy anniversary!”
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout 4.5 “A: cherry over roast malt. Vanilla w/hint of bourbon. Sweet finish w/choc/cocoa & cherry. Not as good as hoped.” $
  • Central City (Surrey, BC) Bourbon Barrel-Aged Imperial Porter [not checked in] “A: bourbon; vanilla. C: Mostly opaque pomegrante-black. A tad thin.“$
  • De Molen Bommen & Granaten English Barleywine (Netherlands) 3.5 “A: Oh. My. C: dk amber. Sweet. Ok. Def malty but needs a tad more hops.”$

Upper Lip (Bailey’s Taproom)

  • Maisel Weisse Original 3
  • Stift Engelszell Benno Trappistenbier [Saison] 2.5

Tugboat

  • Anchor Tug (American brown) 2.5 [photo – left most]

Best beers of the day:

  • Boundary Bay Double Dry Hopped Mosaic Pale Ale
  • Logsdon Straffe Drieling (tripel)
  • Full Sail 26th Anniversary Cascade Pilsner
  • Cigar City Hunaphu Imperial Stout

Day 3 ended fairly well. The next day we’d head home.

My next and last post in this series will cover my top-rated beers and one more small(?) gripe about the fest. See smoking above but realistically nothing can probably be done about that any time soon. There truly were not very many people smoking while I was there but then I went during the “quiet” times.

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap day 2

Day 2: Thu, 24 July

Thursday morning I was feeling the afternoon and evening before. Thanks to being an early riser I had plenty of time to wander Portland and nurse myself back in time for a noon opening. I got to the fest grounds about 11:50 am, got my wristband and headed to the tent with the Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker since so many people were talking about. I was a bit disappointed that there was no noon beer whistle but within a few minutes the “We’re pouring” call came.

I did not drink all of quite a few of my beers this day as my point was to try many and hopefully find a few I truly liked. My top ranked beers of the day were Bear Republic Grand Am APA, Mazama El Duque do Porto, and ‘t IJ Ijwit.

  • Paradise Creek Huckleberry Pucker 3.5 “Like a liquid Sweet Tart but finishes kind weak. Really not so puckery.”
  • Rodenburg Terra Incognito (Netherlands) 3 $
  • Nothhaft Rawetzer Zoigl Kellerbier (Germany) 4 “Bready and lightly sweet.” $
  • Rooie Dop The Daily Grind Coffee Porter (Netherlands) 3 “Ok” $
  • Bayern Amber 4 “More Märzen than amber but tasty”
  • Bear Republic Grand Am APA 4.5 “Tasty.”
  • Grain Station Brew Works Epernay Weiss 4 “Nice but a tad too grainy perhaps. Subtle flavors otherwise.”
  • Mazama El Duque do Porto 5 “Their Grand Cru from port barrels.” $
  • Oakshire Brewers Reserve 7 Anniversary Barrel-Aged Baltic Porter 3 “Tart cherries but a tad thin for a Baltic.” $
  • ‘T IJ Ijwit (Netherlands) missed checking in ? 4.5 “Damned tasty. Could use a tad more CO2. Very lightly spiced.” $

Got a little irate about the wrong mustard.

Portland Spirit

  • Widmer or Fort George Pils
  • Widmer Drop Top Amber 2.5 [ no credit for ship ]

        Thursday evening I took a dinner cruise on the Portland Spirit with the librarians of Library Instruction West conference. They had a couple Widmer beers and wine. I first grabbed the pilsner and when I went to verify if it was Collaborator Czech’d Out Pils or something else the barman told me it was Fort George and they hadn’t been able to get the Widmer. Um, OK. Maybe it was Fort George’s. Next I got a Drop Top Amber but I mainly checked it in to Untappd to get credit for having a beer on a boat but for some reason I did not even though the location says it was a boat.

Day 2 wrapped up nicely and I was in better shape than the previous night, thankfully.

27th annual Oregon Brewers Festival: Recap day 1

I believe that I must say my 1st Oregon Brewers Festival was quite successful. Thanks to Sara being heavily involved in the Library Instruction West conference at Portland State University I was able to attend Wednesday through Friday in a relaxed manner.

Day 1: Wed, 23 July

Left the PSU dorm and arrived at the 27th Oregon Brewers Festival at 2:45 pm. It rained on and off during the afternoon and it even poured a few times. Thankfully, I was under a tent when it did.


I got off to a good start by having my top 3 want-to-try beers in my first 4 beers. I began with the lowest ABV beer present, the Cigar City Blood Orange / Dragon Fruit Florida Weiss, known as Dragon’s Blood in Untappd, and found it refreshing.

My 1st OBF 27 Beer: Cigar City Blood Orange / Dragon Fruit Florida Weiss, known as Dragon’s Blood in Untappd

My 1st OBF 27 Beer: Cigar City Blood Orange / Dragon Fruit Florida Weiss, known as Dragon’s Blood in Untappd

The Sixpoint was practically next door so I had that. Sadly, I was underwhelmed. Next, I went for the also nearby, and fairly high on my list, Sprecher Abbey Triple. I really liked that one. To finish off my top 3 want-to-try beers I wandered down to the other end for the Dogfish Head.

The sign for the Dogfish Head said it was Shelter Pale Ale. No one was in line but there was a guy who had just got a glass chatting with the server as to whether or not it was the old ale or this advertised pale. I noticed it was pretty dark for a pale. For a token I decided it was worth the risk. Oh. My. This was the first of only two five star beers for me at OBF 27. I was so tempted to get a taste of this every day but at 11% ABV it was the strongest beer in the regular 88 beers. My next choice, Deschutes Ester the Farmhouse Maiden, was the third in a row that would end up in my top 10 highest rated beers of the fest. This is in the first 5 beers I tried. Good job prioritizing, Mark. ::pats self on back::

Sara and I had had a discussion of the naming of Ester the Farmhouse Maiden a couple days before we left when I came across it looking at the beer list and making my priority list. I said it had to be a pub beer as pub beers get those kinds of names frequently but not production beers. But which pub? I turned to my friends Jason and Gina at @DeschutesBeer and asked as I know I can rely on them to get correct info. Turns out it is a Portland pub beer and will have a different name when it is bottled soon. 

A guy has a very “Wow!” reaction to his beer so I ask him what it is. Turns out it is a hot pepper saison, he loves it and gives me a sip. Not my thing but tasty.

Note: $ = 2 tokens in Special Tent. Numbers (5 or less) are what I rated the beer and phrases in “” are my comments from Untappd checkins.

Day 1 beers:

  • Cigar City Blood Orange / Dragon Fruit Florida Weiss “Dragon’s Blood” Untappd 3.5 “Refreshing.” [Photo ?]
  • Sixpoint Barrel-Aged 3Beans 3 “Tasty enough though not as good as I hoped”
  • Sprecher Abbey Triple 4.5 “A tad sweet but otherwise amazing! Exceeded expectations and hopes. Aroma = heavenly.”
  • Dogfish Head Oak Aged Strong Ale (posing as “Shelter Pale Ale”) 5 “Amazing! My kind of old ale.”
  • Deschutes Ester the Farmhouse Maiden 4.5 “Excellent.”
  • Stone Witty Moron 3
  • Mazama Rasplendent 4
  • het Uiltje Lekker Bakkie Kobi Imperial Oatmeal Stout (Netherlands) 3.5 $
  • The Dude’s Grandma’s Pecan Brown 4
  • Natian Portland Fog (organic NW golden ale) 2.5
  • Gigantic Who Ate All the Pies? 3.5 “Better than expected.”
  • [?? Old Ale – just deciphered this note from my book. Seems I had another Dogfish Head]
  • Duit & Laurent Stout (Netherlands) – not checked in. “Meh.” $
  • Central City Red Betty Imperial IPA 3.5 “Alright.”
  • Heathen Megadank 4

Had my first Guinness Draught in quite a long time. Hard to believe this is the beer that finally turned me on to stouts. Even on nitro at The Rookery at The Raven & the Rose it was not what I wanted. 2.5 “Really. Seriously. I don’t remember this tasting like this. Thin. Weak.”

Next up, day 2.