Some things read this week, 20 – 26 January 2008

Sunday, 20 Jan 2008

Hjørland, B., & Albrechtsen, H. (1995). Toward a New Horizon in Information Science: Domain-Analysis. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 46, 400-425.

Re-read for bibliography.

Monday, 21 Jan 2008

Liddy, Elizabeth D. “Natural Language Processing for Information Retrieval and Knowledge Discovery.” In Clinic on Library Applications of Data Processing, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 1998. Visualizing Subject Access for 21st Century Information Resources. Eds. Pauline A Cochrane and Eric H Johnson. Champaign, IL: Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [WorldCat]

Busch, Joseph A. “Building and Accessing Vocabulary Resources for Networked Resource Discovery and Navigation.” In Clinic on Library Applications of Data Processing, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 1998. Visualizing Subject Access for 21st Century Information Resources. Eds. Pauline A Cochrane and Eric H Johnson. Champaign, IL: Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [WorldCat]

Fugmann, Robert. “Obstacles in Progress in Mechanized Subject Access and the Necessity of a Paradigm Change.” In Wheeler, William J, ed. 2000. Saving the Time of the Library User Through Subject Access Innovation: Papers in Honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane. Champaign, IL: Publications Office, Graduate School of Library and Information Science. [WorldCat]

Only about halfway through; good so far, but somewhat difficult, and longer than the other 2 combined.

This and previous 2 for Subject Access and Subject Analysis seminar.

Tuesday, 22 Jan 2008

Finished reading Fugmann. What a torturous writing style; but some important things are said. Lots of contact with both Hjørland and Integrationism.

Several things for Ontologies [Sorry. Bring lazy here, or conserving my time. If you are interested in what we are reading early on for Ontologies I will send you a list.]

Wednesday – Thursday, 23-24 Jan 2008

Harris, Roy. 2005. The Semantics of Science. London: Continuum.

  • Re-read ch. 4: Science in the kitchen

This chapter is about the connections (if any) between everyday discourse and scientific discourse. Discusses continuity theories (“… science has both feet on the terra firma of empiricism” 81) and discontinuity theories (“… sharp distinction between the language of science and non-scientific discourse” 81); these, of course, conflict. Reocentric semantics is the reason these integrational problems arise, as “[i]t is typical of reocentric semantics to conflate questions about meanings with putative descriptions of realia” (81-82).

Some of the assorted antagonists in this chapter include: Aristotle, Harré, Adam (Genesis), Medawar, Tarski, Wittgenstein, Whewell, Einstein, Carnap and Popper.

Friday – Saturday, 25 – 26 Jan 2008

Harris, Roy. 2005. The Semantics of Science. London: Continuum.

  • Re-read ch. 5: The rhetoric of linguistic science

About the rhetorical topos of ‘linguistic science.’ Includes assorted linguists’ definitions of science. Discusses the “familiar haloes” of science and scientific of implied merit, reliability, and academic prestige.

Some of the assorted antagonists include: Müller, Vico, Osthoff and Brugmann, Saussure, Sapir, Bloomfield and Z. Harris.

Saturday, 26 Jan 2008

Harris, Roy, and International Association for the Integrational Study of Language and Communication. 2006. Integrationist Notes and Papers : 2003-2005. Crediton, Devon, England: Tree Tongue http://www.librarything.com/work/details/26156294 (Accessed January 26, 2008).
[more info here] [WorldCat]

I ordered this print-on-demand book from an English bookseller via abebooks.com. It contains 15 short position papers as essays. The link at “more info here” has the list of the chapters and one essay in the book online, as well as 3 more newer ones.

I adore the preface (blurb on the back only varies up to “The purpose …”):

Integrationist Notes and Papers began in 2003 as an occasional series of leaflets circulated to members of the International Association for the Integrational Study of Language and Communication. The purpose was to give a brief position statement or comment, from an integrationist perspective, on a variety of controversial issues, in order to provoke further discussion and to show that integrationism is not restricted to topics of interest solely to linguists. The word length of each item was determined by the size of an A4 sheet. The present publication reproduces the original texts, with minor corrections, in the order in which they appeared (7).

I’m guessing both sides of an A4 sheet since each is about 4 pages in this 22 cm. book, but perhaps one. Anyway, I think it’s an awesome idea. And not only since it is basically the sort of thing I need to do to see how Integrationism fits with LIS. ;)

Read:

  1. Communication: or How Jill Got Her Apple
  2. English: How Not To Teach It
  3. Texts and Contexts
  4. On Indeterminacy
  5. Time, Language and Angels

Well, it’s barely after 6 on Saturday but I’m going to post this anyway. Things to do later.

Uncontrolled Vocabulary, the Carnival, and the LC Working Group; or, the recognition of frustration

Back in December, a few days before the deadline passed for comments on the Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control, I wrote a post called just that.

In it I expressed much frustration; with both the big picture issues facing bibliographic control and those of my daily frustration in trying to use the tools my profession supplies me to do so.

I was popping off in that post. Clearly. Heck, I even tossed out an f-bomb. I was (am) mad.

Well, thanks to Anna Creech (or so I believe. By the way, thanks, Anna!) that post showed up both on Uncontrolled Vocabulary #24 [revisited momentarily in #25] and in the Carnival of the Infosciences (#86) about a month after I wrote it.

My first reaction to learning it had been discussed on Uncontrolled Vocabulary was mild shock. Oh my! Which idea in it had they latched onto? Hopefully not my (temporary) defeatist attitude regarding my personal feedback on the report. Thankfully, not.

Greg’s initial “almost motivated me to advocacy” line really struck me. A fair few of my colleagues—I’m guessing a significant percentage—have no real idea of the issues catalogers and metadata folks go through with their tools, or the lack of them.

Everyone picks on the OPAC because it’s easy to do so, and most stripes of librarian have to use one. My gripes are much broader. Yes, the OPAC sucks. But so do the various modules in the ILS. I have almost 7 years experience with Voyager’s circulation and cataloging clients due to working in Circulation; (minimal) Cataloging (E-Reserves); and now Cataloging. I have no doubt the Acquisitions folks have complaints about aspects of that module, and so on.

In cataloging, besides needing our ILS module, we need our classification schedules—either in print or online, or both—DDC in our case, AACR2, subject headings list (LCSH), Classification Web, Cataloger’s Desktop, “foreign” language encyclopedias, Connexion (WorldCat), Cutter tables, ….

Then there are the assorted policies emanating from the many organizations involved. Let’s just leave that at many. And some number of these policies actually constrain the work we can do in most libraries.

While OCLC policies do allow qualified libraries to enrich WorldCat records centrally, some consider these policies to be overly restrictive (On the Record : Report of The Library of …, 13, emphasis mine)

These not very well expressed reasons are why I and many others are frustrated. And most of our colleagues cannot even feel our pains. Folks working with other forms of metadata face similar and related issues with their assorted tools, or lack thereof.

Cooperative cataloging. That’s existed for a long time. Right? People use the phrase all the time so it must be an “entity” of some sort one would assume. I would beg to differ.

I do appreciate the Working Group’s calls for increased cooperation and “distribution of responsibility for bibliographic record production and maintenance” (16). I particularly like:

1.2.4.1 LC, PCC, and OCLC: Explore ways to increase incentives and tools for contributions of new bibliographic records, as well as upgrades or corrections to existing records … (18).

While I realize that some may need incentives, could you please just get out of my way and let me do my (basic) job? Yes, there is a bigger context to this such that this item makes wonderful sense. But I still find it more than mildly ironic.

As slight side excursion based on the first quote from the LC report above:

While OCLC policies do allow qualified libraries to enrich WorldCat records centrally, some consider these policies to be overly restrictive (On the Record : Report of The Library of …, 13, emphasis mine)

When will we stop talking like this? Could someone please explain to someone intelligent involved in writing this report that there is not a single library that has ever produced any kind of surrogate, much less added any records to WorldCat. Nor will there ever be.

This poor use of language (rife in our field and made fun of here before) leads to issues with policies which must be defined within the context of this poor use. Libraries, qualified or not, do not really do anything. People of the cataloging persuasion (or assignment) catalog and add or correct records in WorldCat.

But it is libraries that are “qualified” by our various cooperative agreements. This is part of the problem.

I am not through reading the final report yet, about half-way (read this past Mon. at the diner for dinner. Now 2 past.).

This realization that:

A fair few of my colleagues—I’m guessing a significant percentage—have no real idea of the issues catalogers and metadata folks go through with their tools, or the lack of them.

… I had due to my post being featured in these 2 collective stalwarts of the bibliogosphere around the same time. I was aware of the UV appearance first and there is really something odd about hearing your post discussed on the web.

Like Greg, my realization almost led me to advocacy. But this is a delicate situation for a multitude of reasons. I try to be very careful on the few times I bring my actual experiences at work here. Almost every one of my complaints is with something other than my institution and I do not want to give the impression otherwise. But there is so much that does not get talked about in our field (not only in cataloging, of course). Even critique towards a positive end state is rarely publicly welcomed and/or welcomed in public.

Thus, as much as I would love to spend more time talking about these issues here and perhaps shedding a little light on them for a handful or two of people, I simply cannot do any more than the rare instance when I do. Which lines can or cannot be crossed, and which of the first are wise to do so seem like questions best answered by avoiding them (like everyone else).

There was a bit of discussion in the comments at Uncontrolled Vocabulary #24 about what I was saying. I came a tad late to the party but was able to add a comment clarifying what I was trying to say.

As I wrote there, I am feeling a bit better as I am learning to try and modify in increments. I just wish when you weren’t allowed to change some specific field it would tell you versus making you look in some crazy long document, especially if you forgot the 1st sentence about increments. Other validation errors tell you what the problem is.

But. Yes. I remain frustrated when I cannot do something like change a title that is wrong in a pre-pub record.

I also got a decent amount of long-term headaches taken care of and off of my desk the last couple days. :) I don’t do resolutions anymore but I did swear I was going to move some of that stuff. About half is gone (mostly in the last 2 days) and I’m waiting on an answer on 2 things.

I do feel bad about some of that stuff sitting there for a couple months sometimes. But let’s be realistic here. They give me these things (or wait for someone like me to come along) because they are nightmares and they don’t want to do them. I get a lot of found stuff. Some of it has been sitting somewhere from 2 years to several decades. Literally. So, honestly I can’t really sweat the couple months it’s been on my desk. And as I said it is moving on.

Hope is hard when you are continuously frustrated from doing your job.

Where are the blogging LIS educators?

Back in August 2005, Joy Weese Moll started a movement to identify the MLS student bloggers, which also led to many questions and discussions. Nowadays we have a Ning to hang out in.

I think it is time for a new list and some more questions. Who are the blogging LIS educators? Why are there so few? [assumption and anecdote] What prevents or holds them back from doing so? [I can think of a few possibilities]

I am aware of Michael Stephens and Jens-Erik Mai. Who else is there?

Yesterday a friend wrote me with the following questions:

I’m getting ready to do my Field Exam list and it struck me that the
blogosphere keeps me pretty up to date on practitioner stuff in the
field – but other than Michael Stephens, i don’t think I have many LIS
faculty blogs in my list of feeds.

Are you aware of any good L (particularly I)S blogs by faculty members
where they discuss emerging literature and research practices?

There’s some good ones emerging for digital humanities (Matthew Kirshenbaum, Dan Cohen, etc.). Who’s our LIS faculty blog star?

I had to reply with my addition of Jens-Erik Mai as a possibility. I find that sad. I can think of many reasons why LIS educators might not blog, and those may even be very good ones on an individual basis, but I told him I would ask my people on the tubes anyway. [I definitely 2nd reading Dan Cohen. I suggested his blog for the LISNews list of 10 Non-Librarian Blogs to Read for 2008. Submit here]

As we send this out to the larger group I think a wave in the general area of what is meant by “LIS faculty” [my friend’s term] or “LIS educators” [mine] is warranted. No disrespect meant towards librarians with faculty status [or those in the track] but you are not what we mean (probably). I think faculty in the official sense, restricted to faculty of the LIS schools, is too narrow. Many LIS students are educated by adjuncts of various stripes, both locally and by distance ed. I think all of the educators of our students who meet the other sorts of criteria my friend proposed (or similar enough) could go on the list.

So if you are a librarian who also teaches and commits a decent amount of your blog to items of educational interest then I am interested in putting you on the list. If you teach a course or two as a side job and your blog is on the supreme awesomeness of your cat … well, I feel sorry for your students and I’m not interested in you probably. ;)

Somewhere in between all that and towards the positive side are folks like Meredith and Dorothea. I am interested in them and I read their blogs. I also find them educational. But not the sort of educational my friend means anyway, plus he knows of them already.

I guess we can call it the “Supreme Court” test. We’ll know one when we see one.

And as far as that goes, I am agnostic on whether Stephens and Mai make the list. :)

So who, or where, are they?

Send me some suggestions for blogs by LIS educators that contain a fair amount of educational content, if you know of any.

Interests and the pursuit thereof

One of my co-workers is upset with me due to their perceiving a lack of interest on my part in their little corner of the world. This person’s little corner of the LIS world is even something which ought to be of interest to me since it is beginning to show up on more and more job descriptions.

The problem is that this is of interest to me. But the larger problem is someone else inferring my interest or not based on their perception of my overt actions. Please do not do this. Anyone. Do any of you readers assume that I’m not interested in anything I don’t write about here? [purely rhetorical]

As my “subtitle” says, I am a habitually probing generalist. There isn’t all that much that I am not interested in, at some point. I have never had, nor will I ever have, enough time to pursue everything of interest to me. I imagine many people are like this. But some of us are worse than others.

So, the way I say it, getting petulant with me because your feelings are hurt due to your perception on whether or not I am interested in your stuff is, at best, egotistical, and at worst, seriously disdainful of the amount of things I also do in the world and of the breadth of my interests. Even those in my own field and area/focus of interest are enough to fill my time while there is ever more to be actively interested in.

If you want to claim that I am currently actively interested in some thing over another, or even just observe that this is so (that inference still isn’t fully de-clawed), then fine. I am happy to justify my current business and why there is no overt time for our overlapping areas; I also feel no real need to do so either.

I have no time for petulancy. That is not one of my interests, active or otherwise.

What Martin Luther King Jr. Day now means to me

Truthfully, I will not be addressing that directly as such. Much more oblique will be my comments.

But first some initial resources:

Five years ago today—well, it was 20 January in 2003—I was sitting at home listening to the MLK Jr. specials on the radio (NPR) when at 4:02 PM CT I heard that 12,000 soldiers from Fort Hood (4ID) were being mobilized.

4th Infantry Division (4ID) is the division I retired from and the one my son was serving in at the time. Not that this was publicly known yet, but they were to be the hammer out of the north from Turkey in the initial invasion of Iraq.

Later that evening after a couple pints of beer and attempted reading I went by the ex’s for a hug and some talk. Jeremy called while I was there. Said aircraft had to be on ships down south by the end of the week & they’ll be 2 weeks behind. When I got home from Mary’s I called my mom and then my sister.

So, here I am, almost 44 years old & my baby’s ordered to war. Where did I go wrong? [my journal, 9 PM 20 Jan 2003]

The complete irony of the formal announcement of these deployments on Martin Luther King Jr. Day did not escape me. Nor will it ever.

My son’s deployment was quite hard on me. The reasons are quite complex and I will never fully understand them myself and certainly never be able to explicate them to others.

My son and his family have been lucky so far and he has had a job for the last couple years such that—unlike many who have been back several times in the last almost 5 years of war—he has not. That shall change soon, though. He is on his way back to Fort Hood and the 4th ID.

So here I sit again contemplating my son’s (possible) deployment.

That, and so much more, is what Martin Luther King Jr. Day will forever mean to me.

… consistently we are resistant to love …

Four Bitchin’ Babes. “Beautiful Fool.” Beyond Bitchin’

Song I used to “commemorate” MLK Jr. Day 2003, the mobilization of 4ID and the march to war on my 2003 compilation CD.

Some things read this week, 13 – 19 January 2007

Sunday, 13 Jan 2008

Toolan, Michael. 1997. A Few Words on Telementation. Language Sciences 19, no. 1:79-91.

I had read this before (28 Oct 07) as it is in: Harris, Roy, and George Wolf, eds. Integrational Linguistics: A First Reader. 1st ed, Kidlington, Oxford, UK: Pergamon, 1998.

Sunday – Monday, 13 – 14 Jan 2008

Harris, Roy, ed. 2002. The Language Myth in Western Culture. Richmond Surrey: Curzon. [WorldCat]

  • Carr, Philip. The Mythical, the Non-mythical and Representation in Linguistics
  • Talyor, Talbot J. Folk Psychology and the Language Myth: What Would an Integrationist Say?
  • Davis, Daniel R. The Language Myth and Mathematical Notation as a Language of Nature

Monday, 14 Jan 2008

On the Record: Report of The Library of Congress Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control (January 9, 2008) [pdf]

  • Read about half at the diner for dinner.

Tuesday, 15 Jan 2008

Harris, Roy. “The Language of History and the Language of Science” in Harris, Roy, and Indian Institute of Advanced Study. 2003. History, science, and the limits of language : an integrationist approach. Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study. [WorldCat]

This is the 1st of 4 lectures Harris gave at the Indian Institute of Advanced Study in Shimla, India in October 2002. I ILL’d myself a copy to see if I wanted to buy a copy. For $4.95 and about $15.50 shipping I have a copy of this print-on-demand book on order from India.

Wednesday, 16 Jan 2008

Davis, Daniel R. 1997. The three-dimensional sign. Language Sciences 19, no. 1:23-31.

This week

Harris, Roy. 2005. The Semantics of Science. London: Continuum. [WorldCat]

This is the book Hjørland cites in Semantics and Knowledge Organization in the section on Semantics and the Philosophy of Science (en2, 373/396): “Harris (2005) provides an important critique of the semantic assumptions generally made in science” (396). Of course, that ought to read something more like “made under the supercategory science and also in individual sciences (or perhaps better still, scientific disciplines).”

  • Re-read chap 1: Language and the Aristotelian scientist (14, 16-17 Jan)
  • Re-read chap 2: Before and after Aristotle (17-18 Jan)
  • Re-read chap 3: Semantics and the Royal Society (19 Jan)

Spring 2008 courses, 1st impression

Officially, I am registered for one 8-hour “class” this semester, LIS593 CAS Project.

Individual study of a problem in library or information science; forms the culmination of the Certificate of Advanced Study program. Only 8 hours will apply to the CAS degree [catalog].

As to what I’m doing there pick pretty much any post from last year, but especially starting mid-May. Or, perhaps this is best?

More on this topic <patented hand-waving> in the future </ patented hand-waving>.

Besides working 60% which is beginning to seem like a lot again, I am sitting in on 2 seminars. There are several of us nuts in each of them and some folks actually taking the classes for grades.

Both are on Tuesday, which is my only non-work day, in the afternoon and at night. Both are on campus. I love my distance peeps but I am a bad LEEP student.

590SA Topics in Subject Access : Pauline Cochrane and Kathryn La Barre

An advanced topics seminar in subject access and subject analysis that covers a range of topics including aspects of the traditional bibliographic canon regarding OPACS, the challenge of universal subject access in a digital world, ongoing discussions about Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), new search and discovery tools (including experimentations with hybrid folksonomic and corporate taxonomic approaches (syllabus version). [catalog]

Pauline is emphasizing the duality between subject access and subject analysis, as she says there “is a split in focus in library science [specifically]; these two vantage points are our heritage.”

Early readings/assignments include reading 2 chapters from her festschrift (Wheeler). We’re reading Robert Fugmann, “Obstacles in Progress in Mechanized Subject Access and the Necessity of a Paradigm Change,” and our own Linda Smith’, “Subject Access in Interdisciplinary Research.” I’m not sure if I’ve read the Fugmann but the Smith is excellent. I’ve read it at least 3 times before.

There is another assignment that involves the Clinic book but I am not concerned with doing it.

Readings for next week are the 2 chapters of the festschrift I previously listed, and 2 from Visualizing …: Elizabeth D. Liddy’s “Natural Language Processing for Information Retrieval and Knowledge Discovery” and Joseph A Busch’s “Building and Accessing Vocabulary Resources for Networked Resource Discovery and Navigation.”

Wheeler, William J, ed. 2000. Saving the Time of the Library User Through Subject Access Innovation: Papers in Honor of Pauline Atherton Cochrane. Champaign, IL: Publications Office, Graduate School of Library and Information Science. [WorldCat]

Clinic on Library Applications of Data Processing, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 1998. Visualizing Subject Access for 21st Century Information Resources. Eds. Pauline A Cochrane and Eric H Johnson. Champaign, IL: Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. [WorldCat]

We also are reading an unpublished paper (1979) of Pauline’s on universal subject access and advising her on its suitability for publication today as a means to think about these issues and, I would add, historically and contemporarily.

590OD Ontology Development : Allen Renear

An introduction to formal ontology focusing on development and implementation issues and contemporary ontology software tools and languages. In spring of 2008 we will use as example ontologies one for museum and heritage information (CIDOC-CRM) and one for biological information (the Functional Model of Anatomy). Students may also do projects on other ontologies in other areas if they wish. The ontology editor Protege will be used throughout and the representation of ontologies in W3C semantic web languages RDF(S) and OWL will be emphasized. [catalog]

This is an odd class for Allen as it involves a hands-on component using Protégé to view, edit, build ontologies. Protégé is a free, open-source ontology editor.

Some of the topics we will be becoming “familiar” with are RDF and OWL, which I certainly need more knowledge of.

Related miscellanea

On a side note, I’m thinking of taking the TEI workshop again later in Feb. I did it 2 years ago on my birthday weekend. The then draft P5 version was formalized this past year so it can’t hurt to have a look again over a weekend.

While in one sense, these classes are completely extraneous to me, although in a larger sense they are important. Luckily I’ll have the flexibility to commit any level of effort, including none, to them. I foresee far more than none most of the time, though. Time will tell.

Technically, I still have an incomplete for my vocabularies independent study from last spring. Four hours. In truth, those 4 hours along with those from Bibliography will be extra hours when completed. This needs to be cleaned up as it has finally turned to an F. There is also the possibility of having it dropped, or more likely changed to Withdrawal.

I am hoping that one of these 2 classes will inspire me to spit out “a school assignment” somehow on the topic of vocabularies that I can turn in to be graded. I’d still really like to do what I had planned all along, but it will not happen, now.

Somehow it seems likely one or both will generate a topic. But will it be one that I can just generate something from? Something of quality, of course. But. Normal-sized.

Need a New Name, Round 2

Don’t worry … I’m not looking for a new name for this wittily named blog (wasn’t christened by me anyway ;) ). I’m starting a 2nd blog and no worries. I am not breaking my thoughts here, either. This is nt a professional/other stuff split like has been discussed here before from assorted angles.

My intention is to install a 2nd WP install and the CommentPress (“a WordPress theme for social texts”) theme. If you’re not familiar with CommentPress you should check it out as it has some real potential in varied circumstances. Comes from the good folks at The Institute for the Future of the Book. Here’s an example install with the Iraq Study Group Report.

So, what would I use it for? Current and recent past thoughts (barring unforeseen copyright issues) include: Draft Final Working Group Report, Hsieh-Yee’s report on cataloging/metadata education*, Panizzi’s 91 rules, drafts of parts of my paper as I write it, suggestions from others that fit within my interests, … and then hopefully discussion around those sorts of entities, at assorted resolutions down to the paragraph.

On one hand, I have a very specific and timely (past now) idea and, on the other, a very vague one.

And the beauty of it all … I need a name for it. This is your chance for fame and glory in perpetuity. Just ask Richard and Walt; they still get the credit (or blame?) for naming this blog after about a year and a half now.

With any luck it will be a proverbial water cooler.

Please send suggestions. Most likely without water cooler being involved, though; or, at least it was not an explicit hint.

Now is your chance to:

Find the line, find the shape
Through the grain
Find the outline and things will
Tell you their name

Suzanne Vega “Night Vision” Solitude Standing

Also, it’s your chance to prove Andrew wrong:

you weren’t there that day for the naming of things
the naming of things

Andrew Bird “The Naming of Things” The Mysterious Production of Eggs

Will you be there on naming day?

* Hsieh-Yee, Ingrid. “Cataloging and Metadata Education: A Proposal for Preparing Cataloging Professionals of the 21st Century.” A report submitted to the ALCTS-Education Task Force in response to Action Item 5.1 of the “Bibliographic control of Web Resources: A Library of Congress Action Plan.” Approved by the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services. Web version available since April 2003 at http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/bibcontrol/CatalogingandMetadataEducation.pdf.

Color me “Tickled Pink”

The LISNews 10 Blogs To Read In 2008

Kirsten gets the credit for bringing me the news. ;)

Congratulations to all the outstanding company I found myself amongst. Wow!

Thanks Blake and the perhaps one person who nominated me!

I really love the write-up Blake gave me. :) If those aren’t your reasons, and you have no good ones of your own then perhaps you don’t need to read me. But if they are ….

Hopefully not a factor at all but in the spirit of openness, Blake and LISHost are my hosting service. I recommend them highly.

This really made my day as I headed out of the house about noon. As many of you know I haven’t been doing too well for awhile now, and this year (although I have been somewhat mute about it) has really gotten off to a crappy start. So this was kind of like a 2nd New Year’s Day for me.

I haven’t given up yet and a new start to the year helps a lot.

I left for class after a leisurely morning in 18° sunny weather shortly after finding out about this. It was actually pretty nice out for semi-cold day; no wind). And I chose the music perfectly as I started American Beauty, which begins the immensely aproposBox of Rain“:

… any morning, any evening, any day
Maybe the sun is shining
birds are winging …

….

Look into any eyes
you find by you, you can see
clear through to another day
I know it’s been seen before
through other eyes on other days …

….

Walk into splintered sunlight
Inch your way through dead dreams
to another land
Maybe you’re tired and broken
Your tongue is twisted
with words half spoken
and thoughts unclear
What do you want me to do
to do for you to see you through
a box of rain will ease the pain
and love will see you through

David Dodds, The Annotated “Box of Rain”

David Dodd’s assessment of the connections between this song and “Ripple” are the exact same ones I have made for decades. And first song on the respective sides of the album; that way of knowing is pretty much gone, sadly. And while unclear thoughts are not exactly broken thoughts, there is some kind of connection, in my life at least.

There are, of course, many other wonderful tie-ins to a sunny day, a new beginning, an awakening.

Thanks again, Blake.