Moning, et al. – Fever Moon

Fever Moon, 1st ed. by Karen Marie Moning; adapted by David Lawrence; illustrated by Al Rio and Cliff Richards

Date read: 08-09 April 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover image of Fever moon by Moning, et al.

Hardback, viii, 184 pages

Published 2012 by Del Rey

Source: Deschutes Public Library LAWRENCE DAVID

I grabbed this off the shelf at the public library yesterday evening when we were early for librarian April Witteveen’s talk, “Manga: Japanese Comics Past and Present.” This event is part of this year’s A Novel Idea—Ruth Ozecki’s A Tale for the Time Being—events.

Image of Deschutes Public Library librarian April Witteveen starting her talk, “Manga: Japanese Comics Past and Present.”

Deschutes Public Library librarian April Witteveen starting her talk, “Manga: Japanese Comics Past and Present.”

April’s talk was quite good, by the way. I learned a fair bit about manga and I saw several interesting looking books, whether manga themselves or mange resources. And, no, Fever Moon is not manga [see 1st paragraph].

Contents:

  • Introduction by Karen Marie Moning
  • Prologue
  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Chapter 4
  • Behind the Scenes of the Fever Series
  • Original Character Notes and Sketches

I began by reading the Introduction, the Behind the Scenes … and the Original Character Notes and Sketches. I did this because the graphic novel is an adaptation of a world created in five novels (more now), The Fever Series: Darkfever, Bloodfever, Faefever, Dreamfever, Shadowfever. I know nothing of these books or this world, so I read all the “extra” material first and I believe it probably helped the graphic novel make more sense. That said, the story is reasonably well self-contained. The author has also written many books in The Highlander Series.

Fever Moon is set in Dublin, Ireland (as is the series, I believe). [The book took about an hour to read, maybe. Forty-five minutes? I’m not doing a half hour of research to write this.]

It involves Fae and a battle between the evil Fae and humans (in Dublin, anyway) where the wall separating the worlds has been dropped.

I enjoyed the story well enough and gave it 4 of 5 stars but I’m not going to track down the novels. They might be great but too many more ideas out there. That is, it did not grab me like Manifest Destiny.

It seems Del Rey asked Moning if she would like to do a graphic novel set in her world (Intro). She also got to pick her own artist; she chose Al Rio, who died before the book was finished. The artwork was finished by Cliff Richards. I did not notice any difference in style, although I am not entirely sure what “finished” fully fleshes out to. Nor is my visual literacy in the world of graphic novels all that refined.

I enjoyed it. Very quick read. Recommended for fans of The Fever Series, fans of Fae and human struggles. Fairly mature: sex, rape, desire.

This is the 46th book in my GN2015

Collins and Rayner – Road to Perdition

Road to Perdition (#1) by Max Allan Collins (writing) and Richard Piers Rayner (art)

Date read: 01-02 April 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Collins and Rayner's Road to Perdition

Paperback, 302 pages

Published 1998 by Paradox Press

Source: Deschutes Public Library (COLLINS MAX)

Gritty gangster noir in a memoir-ish vein. Capone, Nitti, Ness and many others, although not directly their story. Is the basis for the 2002 Tom Hanks movie.

Just learned that there are more of these. Five in Goodreads. And my public library has #1 (this one) and #5. Oh. And the 2002 Tom Hanks movies based on it. ::sigh:: Glad I thought I was done.

I enjoyed the story well enough and wouldn’t mind probing a bit further but there are also other stories out there. If they become available to me at some point I may get back to it. Otherwise, not enticed enough to work at getting them.

Recommended for fans of noir, gangsters, ’30s Chicago (and Midwest), and so on.

This is the 45th book in my GN2015

Dunlop – Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana by Pete Dunlop; intro by Angelo De Ieso

Date read: 26-30 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Pete Dunlop's Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana

Paperback, 143 pages

Published 2013 by American Palate, a division of The History Press

Source: Own

Contents:

  • Foreword, by Angelo De Ieso
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Prologue
  • 1: Beginnings: Weinhard’s Beachhead
  • 2: Wrong Way: Road to Prohibition
  • 3: Prohibition: An Unwanted Disaster
  • 4. Repeal: Happy Days Are Here Again
  • 5: Long Shadow: Blitz-Weinhard’s Decline and Legacy
  • 6: Changing Times: The Origins of Craft
  • 7: Crucial Element: The Brewpub Revolution
  • 8: Building Beervana: Craft Beer Goes Mainstream
  • Epilogue. Why Portland?
  • Appendix I. SB 813 (Brewpub Bill)
  • Appendix II. Beerology [glossary]
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • About the Author

I started and read a good bit more than half of this in Portland last week. I own and have read one other book in this series, Bend Beer, by my friend Jon Abernathy. I know that Jon used Dunlop’s book as a model, and a good one it is.

Pete Dunlop is well-qualified to write this book. He’s been in Portland since 1989, has a masters degree in history, has taught high school journalism, and has worked in marketing communication [author bio]. You can find his Beervana Buzz blog here.

Easy. Quick. Informative. Dunlop offers reasons for “Why Portland?” but knows (and demonstrates) that it was/is complex and there are other possible ways to tell the story.

Highly recommended! Not just for fans of Portland beer and breweries but for anyone interested in some of the issues that led to the most breweries in a “single” location.

If you like beer and history then borrow this book from somewhere and read it. Or, of course, buy it. I did.

This is cross-posted at my other blog, Bend Beer Librarian, because that’s my beer blog.

This is the 20th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny

Manifest Destiny. Volume 1, Flora & Fauna by Chris Dingess (writer), Matthew Roberts (penciler & inker), Owen Gieni (colorist), Pat Brosseau (letterer)
Date read: 01 April 2015
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Dingess, et al. - Manifest Destiny

Paperback, 1 volume unpaged
Published 2014 by Image Comics
“Originally published in single magazine format as Manifest Destiny #1-6.”–T.p. verso.
Source: Deschutes Public Library (DINGESS CHRIS)

I quite enjoyed this twisted take on the Lewis and Clark expedition. Sadly, it is currently underway, so I got into it a bit too soon to get it from the library quickly. May have to buy the next volume. And. Then. I’d have to wait for even more. ::sigh::

Just called my local comics shop, Pegasus Books, and they’ll make sure to get it if it isn’t actually there. Fair enough.

The story opens on 23 May 1804 on the Missouri River with the party hopefully a day or two away from La Charette. According to the Timeline of the Lewis and Clark Expedition they passed the village on 25 May. So this really is beginning at the beginning. I am not going to check the full-on historical accuracy but having lived in Sioux city, Iowa for two years I am well aware of Sergeant Floyd [Yeah, yeah. I don’t know why they’re always big phalluses either].

The story line in this collection of the first 6 issues only covers another 5 or 6 days. This could get quite interesting. It could also go on for quite a while. I guess this title, while I still enjoy it, will be my direct monetary contribution to the comics industry. Otherwise, I do get most of my graphic novels from the library or read them on the Internet, or both. So I’ll quit complaining.

I re-read this 3 April to get a better feel for the story. I paid much better attention to the artwork this time and was richly rewarded. The detail is exquisite both aesthetically and also in the way it is used to tell the story.

The text on the back cover refers to “Captain Merriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark” but within the story they are both always referred to as “Captain,” if a title is used. Although York does refer to Clark as “Master.” The first is on page [7?] where Sergeant Parker bursts in and says, “Captain Lewis! Captain Clark! You need to see this!”

When Charbonneau and Sacagawea arrive Lewis states,” I’m Captain Lewis. And this is Captain Clark. You must be–” [?].

According the Lewis and Clark Expedition article it was Captain Lewis and Second Lieutenant Clark. Interesting. I wonder if they truly did just refer to him as “Captain.”

As for especially incredible images, see the flower picked by York [11?], the storyline of the large bird shot by Clark [4-5?] and the other places the bird then shows up. There are many, many other examples.

And just who, or what, is Sacagawea? And the baby?

This is the 44th book in my GN2015

Atkeson – Oregon III

Oregon III by Ray Atkeson. Text by Richard Ross

Date read: 15-29 March 2015

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Cover image of Atkeson's Oregon III

Hardback, 160 pages

Published [1987] by Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company

Source: Deschutes Public Library (OVERSIZE 917.95 ATKESON RAY)

This is the third installment in the Oregon series of photo books by Ray Atkeson put out by the Graphic Arts Center Publishing. I wrote about Oregon II here and about Oregon, My Oregon here (not part of this series but extremely related).

The text is by Richard Ross, whom the back flap describes as:

“a familiar figure to television audiences. for thirty-four years he gathered and wrote news stories, delivering them nightly from the anchorman’s chair, first in Seattle and then in Portland.

With two score and seven years of interviewing experience, Ross set out to meet and write about the people of Oregon. Oregon III, a tribute to the people and the land, is the culmination of his journey around the state and is his first published work.”

This volume fixes one of my gripes with previous ones. Its sections are organized geographically: Oregon Coast, Columbia River, Western Valleys, Cascade Range, Central Oregon, and Eastern Oregon. All of the photos are in color.

Each section is preceded by several pages of text by Ross which profiles the people he met in each region. The text for the first section, Oregon Coast, left me dreading the rest “blah blah this person blah that person.” It was boring. Thankfully the Columbia River section and a couple others were far better. Those seemed to be more historical (Columbia River) or in some other way of interest to me (Central Oregon; also more historical).

No idea who wrote the captions but it is possible it was Atkeson himself.

From the funnier side of life, in the Central Oregon section:

“As for the housing market, Bob [Chandler of Bend Bulletin] says he just hired a new city editor from San Jose who bought, for $90,000, a house that is better than the one he sold for $200,000. Bob says, “You can get the best bargains in housing in the United States of America in Bend, Oregon” (129).

While, in the photo caption on p. 134, we are reminded that “Bend, with a population of just over eighteen thousand, is the county seat of Deschutes County, ….”

Um. Yeah.

The Eastern Oregon section displays a horrific insensitivity:

“This is the land once claimed by Chief Joseph as the ancestral home of his Nez Perce Indians, and one look at the scenery, no less than spectacular, will show you why the Nez Perce fought so long to keep this land. …

Grace Bartlett, whose father owned the Bend Bulletin for several years, is in her seventies and lives right across the road from her daughter’s ranch. Grace has written a lot about the relations between the Nez Perce Indians and the settlers. After the Nez Perce War and the Bannock-Payute uprising in 1878, people really started moving into this part of the country. They were mostly stockmen and farmer—vigorous people with no money, but willing to face real hardships. She says, “This is very rough country to survive in. The weather is very severe and unpredictable. It took people with a grew deal of intelligence as well as ‘guts’ to make a go of it here”” (145).

So the Nez Perce weren’t people, nor were they intelligent, nor did they have guts. What. The. Serious. Fuck!?

Anyway. I still much prefer Atkeson’s black and white work, at least as presented in Oregon, My Oregon or more narrowly in Ski & Snow Country.

This is the 19th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Bollers, et al. – Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black

Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black (1st ed.) by Brandon Perlow, and Paul Mendoza (created by), Karl Bollers (writer), Rick Leonardi (artist chap. 1-4), Larry Stroman (artist – Epilogue)

Date read: 29 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover image of Bollers, et al.,  Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black

Paperback, 1 volume

Published December 2013 by New Paradigm Studios

Source: Deschutes Public Library (PERLOW BRANDON)

I enjoyed this quite a bit but don’t have much to say about it. Two African-American men, Watson is an Afghan war vet and Holmes is a PI, investigate a missing girl and several newborns left in dumpsters around New York City.

Quick read. Recommended for fans of Holmes or of urban fiction/mysteries.

This is the 43rd book in my GN2015

Pedrosa – Three Shadows

Three Shadows (1st American ed.) by Cyril Pedrosa; translated by Edward Gauvin

Date read: 24-26 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Pedrosa's Three Shadows

Paperback, 268 pages

Published April 2008 by First Second

Source: Deschutes Public Library (PEDROSA CYRIL)

This story is beautiful, haunting, and heartbreaking. It is a story of love, sacrifice and denial. Does it work in the end? That is for you to decide.

There may be (probably is) some larger moral here but I tend to miss those sometimes in these sorts of things. Then again, one often needs a couple reads of, say, a philosophical treatise to get its overarching point. And that’s OK.

Either way, whether or not I missed something—or only missed telling you—I quite enjoyed this quick read.

This is the 42nd book in my GN2015

Pilot Butte Update 3

My last Pilot Butte update was in Pilot Butte Update 2 on March 1st. We left off in week 9; here we are in week 13. The last 3 weeks have all been less mileage than week 7 or 9 but they are over 8 miles, which is my target.

  • Week 7     16.19 mi
  • Week 8     8.96 mi
  • Week 9     13.77 mi
  • Week 10    9.71 mi
  • Week 11    9.74 mi
  • Week 12*    11.42 mi

* See below for why week 12 has an asterisk.

Century Club

All of this walking has led from being 30% done with my 1st Century Club in the last update to today’s 50%!

Photo of my Pilot Butte Century Card half full 24 March 2015

It is only March 24th and I have already completed half of the 50 trips around to “equal” 100 miles. 😀

Running

On the 18th of March (* week 12) I set out to do some easy intervals; that is, do some jogging for short stretches alternating with longer walking. I had done that once back a week or so previously.

I wore my new tights, strapped on my running shoes and CamelBak and headed out. I did use Map My Run and recorded it only within the park, which is where I ran. I walked to/from the park.

I ended up running the entire way. Just under 1.8 mi. Seriously kicked my rear end, especially that back half, and somehow I even ended up with a negative split.

I mentioned it on Twitter and got congrats from, and had a short conversation with, two women runners and friends who inspire me. Means a lot to me that they noticed and commented.

Here are a couple images from May My Run; two are from the mobile app and one is from the website.

Screenshot from Map My Run of trail run at Pilot Butte 18 March 2015

From Map My run app

Screenshot from Map My Run of trail run at Pilot Butte 18 March 2015

From Map My run app

The same is shown in another format. And the website [sorry, only a screenshot of one part] has this nifty thing that moves the marker, in sync, around the route both on the map and on the elevation and pace graph.

Screenshot from Map My Run website of trail run at Pilot Butte 18 March 2015

From the Map My Run website (Can be embiggened by clicking.)

Anyway, I am quite pleased with myself and look forward to when I can go running again. Also to finishing my 1st Century Club. Can I do the back half even faster than the first? A negative split, in effect. I bet I can.

I’m not looking for congratulations or kudos of any kind but I documented some of my Pilot Butte exploits here already, and I want to do a better job commenting some on the changes moving to Bend entailed. I have not done a good job of that at all. By meeting both those needs and posting it here I can be reminded of how damn good this felt. To me.

Mallett – Malt

Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse (Brewing Elements Series) by John Mallett

Date read: 07-23 March 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of Malt by John Mallett

Paperback, xxvi, 297 pages

Published 2014 by Brewers Publications

Source: Own

An excellent book that leads one in a natural progression of knowledge of malt. The bottom line, malt matters.

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • 1 Harry Harlan—The ‘Indiana Jones’ of Barley
  • 2 Malt: The Soul of Beer
  • 3 History of Malting
  • Malthouse Tour—Floor Malting in Great Britain
  • 4 From Barley to Malt
  • 5 Specialty Malts
  • Malthouse Tour—Full Scale Modern Malting
  • 6 Malt Chemistry
  • 7 Malt Family Descriptions
  • 8 Barley Anatomy and Agriculture
  • Malthouse Tour—Craft Micro-Maltsters
  • 9 Barley Varieties
  • 10 Malt Quality and Analysis
  • 11 Malt Handling and Preparation
  • 12 Milling
  • Appendix A: Commercially Available Malts
  • App. B: Worldwide and North american Malthouse Capacities
  • App. C: Craft Maltster Listing
  • App. D: Introduction to Home Malting (by George de Piro, reprinted with permission from Zymurgy)
  • Bibliography
  • Index

Commentary

The Brewers Publications Brewing Elements series also contains Yeast, Hops and Water. I do not own, nor have I read, Yeast. I own and have read Hops. I own but have not yet read Water. Turns out the three I own were all pre-ordered from Amazon, varying from exactly 6 months in advance to 3 days.

Another new book on malt is Dave Thomas’ The Craft Maltsters’ Handbook.  Thomas wrote the Foreword for this book (and a blurb on the back). He writes:

“Recently, our paths crossed again when we realized we were both writing books about malt. Mine, The Craft Maltsters’ Handbook, recently published by White Mule Press (Hayward, California), and John’s book published by the Brewers Association (Boulder, Colorado). When we bumped into each other at the 2014 Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, I asked John about possible redundancies between our two projects. He heartily replied’ “don’t worry; yours is written from the maltster’s point of view and mine is the brewer’s perspective. They will complement each other!” He was right. They do nicely.

John talks about the “heavy-lifting” that malt does for brewers. In this book, John has done the heavy lifting for us by presenting (in a very readable fashion) the chemistry of malt carbohydrates, sugars, amino acids, proteins, and lipids. …” (xiii-xiv).

John Mallett is Director of Operations at Bell’s Brewery. His qualifications for writing this book are first-rate. Here’s an interview with Mallett and others.

1 Harry Harlan—The ‘Indiana Jones’ of Barley

Wow! We really do owe Harry Harlan—and Mary Martini—a massive debt of gratitude.

“… she would become a life-long collaborator and great friend to Harlan during his adventures in the world of barley. Together they bred, grew, and assessed new varieties in the US for many years, helping to create the scientific basis for modern barley variety development” (5).

And what adventures he had traveling the world and collecting over 5000 varieties of barley (7)! Seriously, Harry Harlan and Mary Martini’s work needs much greater exposure.

I don’t intend to say a lot about this book, other than it is excellent, nor am I going to do a detailed layout of its Table of Contents, which is a good bit more detailed than above. The chapter titles are quite honest in their description and coverage, though.

The two books in the Brewing Elements Series, from Brewers Association, that I have read contain a wealth of quality information. I suspect the other two do also and am looking forward to reading Water.

This is cross-posted at my other bog, Bend Beer Librarian, as that is where I write about beer and related.

This is the 18th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Yaeger – Oregon Breweries

Oregon Breweries by Brian Yaeger

Date read: 08 February – 19 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Yaeger's Oregon Breweries book

Paperback, xx, 396 pages

Published 1 December 2014 by Stackpole Books

Source: Own (Amazon 3 December 2014) [According to WorldCat neither Deschutes Public Library or COCC’s Barber Library have it.]

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Portland
    • Northwest Portland
    • Southwest Portland
    • Southeast Portland
    • Northeast Portland
    • Portland Metro
  • Coastal
  • The Gorge-Eastern
  • Willamette Valley
  • Bend and Central
  • Southern
  • Beer Festivals
  • Bottle shops and Taprooms
  • Breweries to Come
  • Cheesemakers
  • Cideries
  • Portland Coffee Roasters

Commentary:

Let me state right up front that I enjoyed this book. More importantly, I find it valuable. For me, the factual data—the listing of so many of Oregon’s breweries in one place along with information on them—is what matters. The individual “story” of every brewery, or at least as told by the author, is not my main focus by any stretch, even though some are quite interesting.

I also appreciate how amazingly difficult it would be to write so many entries of basically the same information for all these breweries all the while trying to make them sound different. I would not relish that task. That said, the strain shows on occasion. And sometimes I imagine others might appreciate the author’s humor more than me.

Some “factual” and other issues first:

Full Sail is included in the Coastal group when it should be in The Gorge-Eastern, while Oregon Trail is included in Southern instead of Willamette Valley.

There are two listings of the breweries. The first is in the table of contents where they are separated into areas/regions (such as, Northwest Portland or Bend and Central) and then listed alphabetically. The second is the Brewery Locations map which lists them all alphabetically and then gives each a number that corresponds to, basically, the county it is in. That means all of the Portland breweries have one number (2) on the map.

A separate map of Portland, divided by quadrants, would be most useful!

I also realize that alpha order is easy but that doesn’t make it the right organizational tool, especially if you have multiple tools available. Some of the areas/regions would be harder than others but Coastal could go north to south or vice versa and The Gorge-Eastern could also easily go east to west, etc. That would make “small,” regional visit planning easier. This is not everybody’s use case though so not sure this is an entirely fair critique.

Each section has an intro that gives a quick overview of the region, along with a nice listing of non-beer-related places to visit. Each brewery entry generally consists of the following sections of info: Name and address, contact info, logo; textual entry; Beers brewed; The Pick; and a listing of other info like hours. Each full entry is from one to three plus pages and a few do not have The Pick and a few also do not have Beers brewed.

In the textual entry we get Yaeger’s impressions, perhaps an origin story or some other hook, and other facts or interesting tidbits. Beers brewed is what it purports to be, while The Pick is Yaeger’s pick from his visit. May not be available when you visit, of course.

The textual entry makes up most of the space in a brewery’s entry once past one page, so it is kind if interesting to see who gets more pages and who doesn’t (see, e.g., Ale Apothecary and Barley Brown’s). The final bit of info contains: Opened (year), Owner(s), Brewer(s), System, Annual production, Distribution, Hours, Tours, Takeout beer, Gift shop, Food, Extras. Some have less info at the end but most contain the same bits of data.

As I said up top, the strain of writing so many similar, yet hopefully different, entries took its toll once in a while. I certainly am not going to point out all of the minor distractions but I do want to point out a few.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales

“In the mid-eighties, Logsdon cofounded neighboring Full Sail Brewery, then colaunched yeast industry giant Wyeast Labs, so naturally the beers he and partner Chuck Porter make are yeast-forward saisons” (207).

Um, no, that doesn’t follow. “Yeast-forward” follows, perhaps. But “saison” most certainly does not. Full Sail is not particularly known for saisons and Wyeast has quite a few strains of yeast.

BricktownE Brewing Co.

“BricktownE’s location was built in the 1890s, according to owner and craft beer crusader Craig McPheeters, and a brothel used to operate upstairs. You could call their Workin’ Gal BrownE Ale, which busts a nutty flavor and mouthfeel, an homage.” (344).

Um. OK. He really did go there.

Caldera Brewing Co.

“Another amazing treat from my last visit was intended to be a replica of Red Sea, just like Mills brewed in Kona, but they accidentally left Mogli’s bourbon, chocolaty oak spirals in the fermentation tank. The resulting warming vanilla …” (347).

Wait. I’m supposed to drink beer from a brewery that can’t even begin to clean a fermentation vessel properly? If they leave physical items in their tanks accidentally, deity only knows what else is “left.” I think the story is probably something else and worded poorly. At least I hope so.

Draper Brewing

“He has experience at some small-by-most standards breweries including Lost Coast and Mad River, both in Humboldt County, which makes sense since he’s originally from Northern California. Mad River happens to be one of my favorite breweries from that area, so it stands to reason that he has folded some of the tricks he picked up there into his own operation” (350).

Not the way causation, or grammar, works. The last clause follows from the first clause of the first sentence but not from the clause it follows. The author’s liking of Mad River has nothing to do with any of the other clauses. Stackpole’s editors seem to be nodding off once in a while.

Walkabout Brewing Co.

“Nearly as popular is Jabberwocky, perhaps with the implication that each 22-ounce bottle implores you, in its best Lewis Carroll voice, to “drink me” (374).

Wrong character in a completely different work. Easy cultural references and allusions aren’t always good ones. And,, yes, I know that most people won’t get the difference, or care. But literature matters. Literary allusion matters.

Again, this had to be a very tough job and the author has done a fine job with a limited amount of space for each entry on the many, many breweries we have in Oregon. I’m not trying to nitpick by pointing out the above but show that there are some small issues; reasons for which I only rated it 4-stars.

Breweries to Come

[Keep in mind this book was released 1 December 2014; that is, is quite new]

This is a two-page listing of the breweries in the process of becoming operational; that is, in planning and/or outfitting.

Of the two mentioned for Bend, one (North Rim) has been open a while now and at least one other not listed (Monkless Belgian Ales) is also already open.

Also not listed, Craft Kitchen and Brewery is replacing Old Mill Brew Wërks, which is out of business.

Immersion Brewing has been announced.

Redmond’s scene is definitely growing. See the bottom of Jon’s post here for some new ones.

The problem with these sorts of books is that they are out-of-date as soon as they are published. For a place like Oregon even before publication. Remember, release date was not even four months ago.

I would really love to see this sort of thing as a wiki, with accompanying map(s), and various ways to slice and dice the data. Perhaps the Oregon Brewers Guild should do such a thing (just do it well!) and you could get access with SNOB membership. Wouldn’t help out-of-state visitors or the simply inquisitive and not-yet-converted.

Honestly, I just want it open and available. But who will maintain it? A definite early-21st century issue. This is not a dig on Yaeger’s book but on the entire class of book like this. His has superseded, at least partly, two other books. Neither of which is that old. His will be too. Soon.

Anyway, for the most up-to-date listing of Central Oregon breweries (and their order of operation) just look in Jon’s sidebar at the Brew Site.

Again, I think this is a darn fine book of its type. For me it will serve as a reference book (I did purchase a copy after all). I have already used it extensively in making plans for our trip this week to Portland.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, Bend Beer Librarian, since that is where the beer writing (mostly) goes.

This is the 17th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair