2016 Reading Challenges followup

This post covers my 2016 Reading Challenges and goals, as best as my data and time allow.

Personally set goals and some counts

Total number of books finished in 2016:  120

  • Nonfiction:  54
  • Fiction:  64
  • Graphic novels: 60
  • Ebooks:  8
  • Beer & Brewing:  15
  • Biography:  2
  • Central Oregon:  3
  • Cookery:  6
  • Erotica/Sex & Gender: 3
  • History: 5
  • Librariana:  0; 1 in progress very slowly
  • Literature/Language:  2
  • Memoir:  2
  • Philosophy:  3
  • Photography:  2
  • Poetry:  2
  • Renewal:  5
  • Science:  6
  • Tech/Software:  2
  • Translations: 14
  • Wander: 3
  • YA & Kids:  13

I know one book counted as both fiction and nonfiction: Aesop, Five Centuries of Illustrated Fables. No doubt some counts in some of the categories could be retroactively changed if I felt like reanalyzing many entries. For instance, science just went up by 2 [doubled] with just a quick look. Taking data as is though until I see a need to do otherwise. It has already received a fair bit of “fact checking” and cross-checking.

These were my generic goals for 2016:

  • More poetry; re-reading encouraged here,
  • More erotica, sex & gender.
  • Less graphic novels.
  • More literature.
  • Librariana? didn’t read any in 2015. “Who have I become?, one might ask.
  • Translations check.
  • Ebooks check.
  • Nonfiction check.
  • More essays and short stories.

How did I do on these?

Not so well. I read 1 less in poetry [3 vs 2 (2015 vs 2016)]; same number on erotica, sex & gender [3]; less than two-thirds as many graphic novels, so nailed this one [99 vs 60]; 7 less in lit [8 vs 1]; still 0 in librariana but I am working on one (very slowly); 7 less translations [21 vs 14]; 28 less ebooks [36 vs 8]; 14 less nonfiction [68 vs 54]; and as best I can tell no change in essays and short stories [0? vs 1?]. Not so well at all. The only one I actually accomplished was reading less graphic novels. ::sigh::

Books currently reading being read [2016current]

Finish all nine of the books I am supposedly currently reading.

  • Dunegan – Best Hikes Near Bend (A Falcon Guide)
  • Berlin – The Power of Ideas
  • Oliver – The Brewmaster’s Table
  • Bennett, ed. – Japanese love poems
  • Bishop – Living with Thunder
  • Gilbert – Collected poems [gave up]
  • Kabat-Zinn – Full Catastrophe Living
  • Farhi – The breathing book
  • Hornsey – Alcohol and its role in the evolution of human society

Finished 5 and gave up on one. Sara and I were reading that to each other and we both agreed to quit it. So calling this 5 for 9. Not great but acceptable.

2016 Books To Read Challenge (personal) [2016poss]

Read 12 of 44 possible

Read 11 of 12. Of the 11 categories I read books from this list in 7 of them [and one is currently being read from another for 8]. I read books in all those other categories, just not from this list. So calling this one close enough.

2016 Goodreads Challenge

My goal is 100 this year, up from 75 last year. I have been alternating between demolishing my goals and being a bit over here for several years.

Made this a while ago. Not quite as early or numbers as high as last year but I also read a lot less graphic novels. Total read is 120.

Challenges hosted elsewhere

Nonfiction Reading Challenge 2016 [2016nfc]

Master level 16-20 books (top) Reached 20 on 05 June 2016 [well, finished reading; not posted yet],

25 reviews posted. 54 nonfiction books read in total.

Books in Translation Reading Challenge 2016 [2016trans]

Linguist 10-12 books (top)

12 books reviewed. 14 translations read.

2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge [2016gnc]

  • 12 for Modern Age [Reached 31 January 2-16]
  • So 24 for Bronze Age [Reached 8 May 2016]
  • 52 for Silver Age [Reached 15 December 2016]

52 reviews posted but 60 graphic novels or manga read.

More breakdowns [books by month; from libraries]

These are the books I finished in 2016 by month (6 were started in 2015 and 1 in 2014!):

Author Title

January

  • Bennett, ed. Japanese love poems
  • Oliver The Brewmaster’s Table
  • Modan The Property
  • Fetter-Vorm Trinity
  • Berlin The Power of Ideas
  • Harris Integrating Reality
  • Hester Vegan Slow Cooking: For Two or Just for You
  • MacLean ApocalyptiGirl: Aria for the End Times
  • Lee and Hart Messenger: The Legend of Joan of Arc
  • Brrémaud and Bertolucci Love: The Fox
  • McKendry Aesop, Five Centuries of Illustrated Fables
  • Brontë, A The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
  • Modan exit wounds
  • Pond Over Easy
  • Tezuka Ode to Kirihoto
  • Way & Ba The Umbrella Academy: Apocalypse Suite [1]
  • Abouet & Oubrerie Aya
  • Modan Maya makes a Mess
  • Way & Ba The Umbrella Academy: Dallas [2]
  • Foster Porter (Classic Beer Styles 5)

February

  • Wang Koko Be Good
  • Brrémaud and Bertolucci Love: The Tiger
  • Foster Brewing Porters & Stouts
  • Williams A Pictorial History of the Bend Country
  • Backes Cannabis Pharmacy
  • Modan Jamilti and Other Stories
  • Hayden The Story of My Tits
  • Alanguilan Elmer
  • Simone, et al. Red Sonja: Queen of Plagues (1)
  • Simone, et al. Red Sonja: The Art of Blood and Fire
  • Black The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book
  • Morrison, et al. The Invisibles : say you want a revolution
  • Strong Brewing Better Beer
  • Waters Tipping the Velvet

March

  • Gunders Waste Free Kitchen Handbook
  • Thug Kitchen Thug Kitchen Party Grub
  • Dunlap-Shohl My degeneration: a journey through Parkinson’s
  • McQuaid Tasty
  • North & Henderson The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #1 (2015)
  • Delavier Delavier’s core training anatomy
  • Hennessy, Smith and McConnell The Comic Book Story of Beer
  • Vitrano The Nature and Value of Happiness
  • Hoffman Survival lessons

April

  • Tucholke Wink Poppy Midnight
  • Immonen & Immonen Moving Pictures

May

  • Miyazaki Princess Mononoke: The First Story
  • Rail Why Beer Matters
  • Tezuka Apollo’s Song
  • Lawson & Smith Sidewalk Flowers
  • Guojin The Only Child
  • Stuppy, et al. Wonders of the plant kingdom
  • Rail The meanings of craft beer
  • Miller Dave Miller’s Homebrewing Guide
  • Jackson The New World Guide to Beer
  • Kemp A bouquet of gardenias
  • Love Bayou, volume one
  • Dysart, et al. Neil Young’s Greendale

June

  • Yana Toboso Black Butler I
  • Yana Toboso Black Butler II
  • Stevenson Nimona
  • Dunegan Best Hikes Near Bend (A Falcon Guide)
  • Chapman The 5 Love Languages
  • Love and Love Shadow Rock
  • Love and Morgan Bayou, volume two
  • Toboso Black Butler III
  • Ratey Spark
  • Toboso Black Butler IV
  • Tonatiuh Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras
  • Halloran The new bread basket
  • ACSM ACSM’s Health-Related Physical Fitness Assessment Manual

July

  • DeConnick, et al. Bitch Planet, Vol. 1: Extraordinary Machine(Bitch Planet (Collected Editions))
  • Miller Water: A Global History (The Edible Series)
  • Kissell Take Control of Upgrading to El Capitan

August

  • Martin, et al. A Game of Thrones: The Graphic Novel, volume 1
  • Herz & Conley Beer Pairing
  • Martin, et al. A Game of Thrones: The Graphic Novel, volume 2
  • Arcudi, et al. A god somewhere
  • McCool and Guevara Nevsky: a hero of the people
  • Martin, et al. A Game of Thrones: The Graphic Novel, volume 3
  • Martin, et al. A Game of Thrones: The Graphic Novel, volume 4
  • Ottaviani & Purvis The imitation game
  • Vaughan, et al. Paper Girls 1
  • Abel La Perdida
  • Carriger Prudence (The Custard Protocol; 1)
  • Carriger Imprudence (The Custard Protocol; 2)
  • Ottaviani & Wicks Primates: The fearless science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Gladikas
  • Owens How to Build a Small Brewery
  • Orchard Bera the one-Headed Troll

September

  • Rowling The Tales of Beedle the Bard
  • Cantwell & Bouckaert Wood & Beer
  • McCoola & Carroll Baba Yaga’s Assistant
  • Hales, ed. Beer & Philosophy

October

  • Samanci Dare to disappoint: growing up in Turkey
  • Ellis, et al. Trees, volume one: In shadow
  • Schuiten & Peeters The leaning girl
  • Tsutsumi, et al. Out of Picture Volume 1: Art from the Outside Looking In

November

  • Stockton South Sister: a Central Oregon volcano
  • ATK Healthy Slow Cooker Revolution
  • Protz The ale trail
  • Smith The Wander Society
  • Krucoff Healing Yoga for Neck and Shoulder Pain: Easy, Effective Practices for Releasing Tension and Relieving Pain
  • Hensperger & Kaufmann The ultimate rice cooker cookbook
  • Sumner Brewing Science, Technology and Print, 1700-1880
  • Duarte Monsters! and Other Stories

December

  • Maltz, ed. intimate kisses
  • Milne The Complete Tales & Poems of Winnie-the-Pooh
  • Out of Picture Volume 2: Art from the Outside Looking In
  • Brown Andre the giant: Life and legend
  • Hanh How to walk
  • Brubaker & Phillips Fatale, Book 1: Death Chases Me (Fatale #1)
  • Brubaker & Phillips Fatale, Book 2: The Devil’s Business (Fatale #2)
  • Ottaviani & Big Time Attic Bone Sharps, Cowboys, and Thunder Lizards: Edward Drinker Cope, Othniel Charles Marsh, and the Gilded Age of Paleontology
  • Smith, et al. Long Walk to Valhalla
  • Colfer, et al. The Supernaturalist
  • Montellier & Mairowitz The Trial
  • Culbard, Edginton; Doyle The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • Bagieu Exquisite Corpse
  • Bishop Living with Thunder
  • Bryson Tasting whiskey
  • Dawson The Place WherE I Come From

Totals finished per month are:

  • Jan 20
  • Feb 14
  • Mar 9
  • Apr 2
  • May 12
  • Jun 13
  • Jul 3
  • Aug 15
  • Sep 4
  • Oct 4
  • Nov 8
  • Dec 16

Not entirely sure what happened in April, July September or October. Perhaps I simply was reading more longer books then and thus finished less. Or, I cut my right index finger to shreds along with minor finger and hand injuries in April so … who knows?

 From libraries:

  • Central Oregon Community College Barber Library: 12
  • Deschutes Public Library: 58
  • Summit (consortium): 7
  • OSU-Cascades: 3
  • Interlibrary Loan: 1 [suspect is a bit higher]

So, 81 of 120 books came from libraries. Not bad. Then again, several of these started out as books from the library that I/we went on to purchase.

Wrap-up:

There is always more can be said–genders of authors; but that is pretty much a mug’s game–and perhaps I have forgotten something I wanted to count or add but oh well. I have straightened out some categories to track for 2017–things to make life easier, or at least I hope. I already have two posts re books in 2017 up but at least one more will be coming.

Williams & Crowell – A Pictorial History of the Bend Country

A Pictorial History of the Bend Country by Elsie Horn Williams and Jim Crowell

Date read: 15 January – 05 February 2016
My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc
No pic available
Hardback, 223 pages
Published 1998 [Rev., 2nd ed. cover title: The Bend Country: Past to Present] by The Donning Company Publishers
Source: Central Oregon Community College Barber Library [F 884 .B38 W54 1998]

I enjoyed this well enough; it had its moments. To either side of the pendulum. I learned a few things about Bend I hadn’t known and had a few others reinforced.

Contents:

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • I. 1825-1877
  • II. 1877-1900
  • III. 1900-1904
  • IV. 1904-1911
  • V. 1911-1915
  • VI. 1915-1920
  • VII. 1920-1933
  • VIII. 1933-1950
  • IX. 1950-1970
  • X. 1970-1983
  • XI. 1984-1998*
  • Bibliography
  • Author Biographies
  • Index

* Rev., 2nd ed. Ch. XI 1984-1998 (c)1998 by Jim Crowell. 1st ed. was 1983.

This is book of photos of the Bend area and its residents, along with captions providing context, divided up into chronological order. The photos within sections—and even across once or twice—are a bit looser.

Recommended if you are interested in Bend history. Not exactly a history as such but it is captioned historical photos.

[Of interest to no one except other book metadata geeks]

As a cataloger, let me say that this book is a mess! It does not help that the work itself doesn’t do the best job of representing itself, at least in the rev. 2nd edition I have at hand. There are records for both editions in Worldcat but the title is clearly different in the newer one. Or is it? The title page still says “A pictorial history of the Bend Country,” which according to the records should be the title of the first edition. But clearly on the cover, the spine, and the dust jacket of this edition it says the title is: “The Bend Country: Past to Present.” Title page verso has LC CIP which has the title as “Bend: a pictorial history.” Considering we use the title page as our main source it is correct. The MARC record does have an alternate title for the cover title. Still. Publishers you need to understand how things are cataloged if you want to rename works. Or generally.

This is the 7th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Books read in 2015

It looks like I read 171 titles in 2015 with another 7 re-read which were previously read in other years and 2 re-read which were also first read in 2015. There were, of course, titles skimmed, put on pause and given up on.

This year I have been tracking my reading in a Google Sheet and at Goodreads. Still working out workflow for this mess of an activity; i.e., tracking book reading.

The first grouping will be data from my Google Sheet, followed by some from Goodreads, links to previous 2015 reading-related posts, and a list of titles read in 2015 by gross categories.

Google Sheet

This data consists of total entered in Sheet, breakdown of reading status of titles brought forward from 2014, titles entered in 2015 and their breakdown of reading status, reading challenges, books re-read, ebooks, “genre” breakdowns, and sources for the books.

Total

198 [all are in Goodreads]

Brought forward from 2014:

Total 7
Finished 3
On pause 3
Currently Reading 1

Entered  in 2015:

Total 191
Read 171
Gave up 4
Skimmed 3 [skimmed many I did not enter in Sheet; 34 in 2015 according to Goodreads]
On pause 11
Currently reading 8 + 1 started in 2016

Reading Challenges

My own reading goals for 2015: 9 Read [of 12 committed to] + 2 currently reading + 3 on pause. I may post on this separately but calling it met, if barely.

2015 Reading Challenge: 35* of 50 categories. I may’ve accomplished some of the others but I have no good way of knowing re a couple categories. Not concerned. I may post on this separately. Calling it met; had no real criteria in mind so 35 seems fair.

2015 8th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge: 52. Completed on 25 April 2015. In total, I read 99 graphic novels or manga [does not include rereads: 2015 2 + previous years 2 + 1 gave up] but did not post & link reviews for the challenge.

2015 Nonfiction Reading Challenge: 20. Completed 20 April 2015 [includes 1 reread from previous year + 3 in graphic novel challenge also; does not include 3 on pause or 1 I never reviewed]. I finished 68 nonfiction books but clearly did not review or link then to the challenge.

Goodreads 2015 Reading Challenge: Goal of 75, reached 29 April 2015. Recorded 166 books for 221% of goal. These totals do not include ~3 books re-read nor those titles read and re-read in 2015.

Books Re-read

Total 11
Read 1st in previous year 8 [Nonfiction/Beer, NF/Literature & Language, 2 Graphic Novels, 4 Lit]
Read 1st & 2nd in 2015 3 [Nonfiction/Beer, 2 Graphic Novels]

Titles Re-read

Saunders – Dinner in the Beer Garden
Doyle – Through the Magic Door
Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 1: Flora & Fauna $
Folio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Sleeping City (Girl Genius 13) $
Vaughan & Staples – Saga, Volume One
Vaughan & Staples – Saga, Volume Two
Adams – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
Adams – The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
Adams – Life, The Universe and Everything
Adams – So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
Boak & Bailey – Gambrinus Waltz $

[$ = read & re-read in 2015]

Ebooks

Total 36 + 2 on pause (1 each)
Kindle 3 finished (2 Beer, Erotica)(incl. 1 re/read 2015 Beer) + 1 on pause (Tech)
PDF 34 (2 Assorted, 30 Graphic Novels + 1 on pause (Tech)

I read so many PDF graphic novels as they are all from either the Girl Genius series via a Kickstarter or from a Dungeons & Dragons Humble Bundle I bought earlier in 2015. I have done a couple Humble Bundles and have read few of them; I tend to forget them. So I wanted to get to work on that and chose these first.

Genre

NF [includes 6 graphic novels, 1 of which is of war poetry + memoir]

Total 92
Finished 68
On pause 11
Currently Reading 7
Gave up 3
Skimmed 3

Fiction

Total 104
Graphic Novels 93 + 1 gave up
Erotica 2
Lit 8
Poetry 1 + 1 currently reading

Other Breakdowns

Photo 6
Beer 26 + 2 currently reading
Graphic novel 99 + 1 gave up [includes 11 manga & 6 nonfiction]
Erotica 2
Poetry 3
Memoir 3 + 1 gave up
Central OR 4 + 1 currently reading
History 10 + 1 currently reading
Translations 21

Together

Read 1
On pause 1
Switch to ind. reading 1
Currently reading 1

Sources

Own 92 + 3 more bought after getting from a library
DPL 77 + 1 gave up + 3 on pause + 1 skimmed + 3 then bought (1 of which still reading) + lots more skimmed. 85 total.
COCC 6
ILL 0 [acquired 2 : 1 gave up and 1 on pause]
Summit 6 + 2 currently reading
Friend 1

Goodreads

This data from my Goodreads account includes, 2015 Goodreads Challenge status, reading status breakdown, and some numbers from specific shelves (mostly used to verify same info from elsewhere).

2015 Challenge goal 75
Read 163 [does not include 7 re-reads]
Currently reading 8 + 1 from 2016
Gave up 2
Skimmed 34
On pause 6

Shelves

2015-gnc 61 [does not include rereads: 2015 2 + previous years 2]
2015nfc 21 [includes 1 reread from previous year; 1 review not written]
translation 21
together 1 + 1 currently reading + 1 on pause + 1 switched to individual reading

Other 2015 reading posts [re challenges, etc.]

List of 2015 Books Read by Category

Assorted

  • Quadback-Seeger – World of the Elements: Elements of the World
  • Attlee – Nocturne: A Journey in Search of Moonlight [on pause]
  • Backes – Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana [on pause]
  • Kondo – The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up
  • Stilgoe – Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places
  • Stivers – Hair of the Dog: Irish Drinking and Its American Stereotype
  • Scerri – The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction
  • Rubel – Bread: A Global History (The Edible Series)
  • Jung – Man and His Symbols [gave up]
  • Bishop – Living with Thunder: Exploring the Past, Present, and Future of the Pacific Northwest [currently reading]
  • Rothenberg, ed. – White Privilege: Essential Readings on the Other Side of Racism
  • Egan – The Good Rain: Across Time & Terrain in the Pacific Northwest [on pause]
  • Sahlins – Waiting for Foucault, Still
  • Babauta – Focus: a simplicity manifesto in the Age of Distraction

Assorted Cookery

  • Robertson – Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker
  • Steen & Noyes – The Great Vegan Protein Book
  • Scicolone – The Italian Slow Cooker

Assorted Memoir

  • Nguyen – Stealing Buddha’s Dinner [gave up]
  • Pollan – A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams

Beer & Brewing

  • Boak & Bailey – Brew Britannia: The Strange Rebirth of British Beer
  • Yaeger – Oregon Breweries
  • Allen and Cantwell – Barley Wine: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes
  • Mallett – Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse
  • Saunders – Dinner in the Beer Garden [re-read]
  • Dunlop – Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana
  • Amato – Beerology: Everything You Need to Know to Enjoy Beer … Even More
  • Fix – Principles of Brewing Science: A Study of Serious Brewing Issues
  • Coutts – The Perfect Keg: Sowing, Scything, Malting and Brewing My Way to the Best Ever Pint of Beer
  • Mosher – Mastering Homebrew: The Complete Guide to Brewing Delicious Beer
  • Barich – A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub
  • Alworth – The Beer Bible
  • Nelson – The Barbarian’s Beverage: A History of Beer in Ancient Europe
  • Beechum and Conn – Experimental Homebrewing: Mad Science in the Pursuit of Great Beer
  • Acitelli – The Audacity of Hops: The History of America’s Craft Beer Revolution
  • Hornsey – Alcohol and Its Role in the Evolution of Human Society [currently reading]
  • Boak & Bailey – Gambrinus Waltz: German Lager Beer in Victorian and Edwardian London [read & re-read this year]
  • Palmer – How to Brew: Everything You Need to Know to Brew Beer Right the First Time
  • Bostwick and Rymil – Beer Craft: A Simple Guide to Making Great Beer
  • Mosher – The Brewer’s Companion: Being a Complete Compendium of Brewing Knowledge … [skimmed]
  • Foster – Pale Ale: History and Brewing Techniques, Recipes: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes
  • Papazian – The Complete Joy of Home Brewing 4th ed
  • Hughes – A Treatise on the Brewing of Beer
  • Zainasheff & Palmer – Brewing Classic Styles: 80 Winning Recipes Anyone Can Brew
  • Oliver – The Brewmaster’s Table: Discovering the Pleasures of Real Beer with Real Food [currently reading]
  • Shales – Brewing Better Beers

Central Oregon

  • Dunegan – Best Hikes Near Bend (A Falcon Guide) [currently reading]

Central Oregon Memoir

  • Waterston – Where the Crooked River Rises: A High Desert Home

Central Oregon Memoir & History

  • Ramsey – New Era: Reflections on the Human and Natural History of Central Oregon

Erotica, Sex & Gender

  • Williams – Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History
  • Christina – Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories about Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More
  • Tyler, ed. – Luscious: Stories of Anal Eroticism

Graphic Novels

  • Foglio, et al. – The Secret Blueprints For Volume One (Girl Genius 0)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne & the Beetleburg clank (Girl Genius 1)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Airship City (Girl Genius 2)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Monster Engine (Girl Genius 3)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Circus of Dreams (Girl Genius 4)
  • Bendis & Maleev – Scarlet
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Clockwork Princess (Girl Genius 5)
  • B. and MacOrlan – The Littlest Pirate King
  • Pham – Sumo
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Golden Trilobite (Girl Genius 6)
  • Abnett and Culbard – The New Deadwardians
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Voice of the Castle (Girl Genius 7)
  • Kerascoët and Hubert – Beauty
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Chapel of Bones (Girl Genius 8)
  • Vehlmann & Kerascoët – Beautiful Darkness
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Heirs of the Storm (Girl Genius 9)
  • David and Lopez – Fallen Angel
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Guardian Muse (Girl Genius 10)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Hammerless Bell (Girl Genius 11)
  • Mina, et al. – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Book 1
  • Mina, et al. – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Book 2
  • TenNapel – Ratfist
  • Moon and Bá – De: Tales: Stories From Urban Brazil
  • Tobin and Dewey – I Was The Cat
  • Merveille and Tati – Hello, Mr. Hulot
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Siege of Mechanicsburg (Girl Genius 12)
  • Cruse – Stuck Rubber Baby
  • Pedrosa – Three Shadows
  • Perlow, et al. – Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black
  • Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 1: Flora & Fauna [read & re-read this year]
  • Collins & Rayner – Road to Perdition
  • Moning, et al. – Fever Moon: The Fear Dorcha
  • Lucke – The Lunch Witch (#1)
  • Wilson and Alphona – Ms. Marvel: No Normal
  • Wilson, et al. – Ms. Marvel: Generation Why 2
  • Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 2: Amphibia & Insecta
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 1: Cold Dead Fingers
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 2: Crossroads
  • Greenberg – The Encyclopedia of Early Earth
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 3: Bound
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 4: A Town Called Penance
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Sleeping City (Girl Genius 13) [read & re-read this year]
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 5: Winter Wolves
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 6: Ghost Dance
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth gun: Book 7: Not the Bullet, But the Fall
  • Nolan – Hunters of the Great Forest
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume One [re-read]
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Two [re-read]
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Three
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Four
  • McCloud – The Sculptor
  • Carey, Willingham, et al. – The Unwritten: The Unwritten Fables, vol. 9
  • Carey & Gross, et al. – The Unwritten: War Stories, vol. 10
  • Miller & Varley – 300
  • Vance & Burr – Kings in Disguise: A Novel
  • Hagio – A Drunken Dream and Other Stories
  • Remender – Strange Girl Omnibus
  • Fawkes – The People Inside [gave up]
  • Moore & O’Neill – Nemo: Heart of Ice
  • Ralph – Daybreak
  • Kelso – The Squirrel Mother
  • Selznick – The Marvels
  • Doctorow and Wang – In Real Life
  • Fleisher, Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 1
  • Grubb, Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 2
  • Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 3
  • Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 4
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms: Cutter
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 1
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 2
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 3
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 4
  • Greenwood, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms, Volume 1
  • Zub, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Legends of Baldur’s Gate
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt – Neverwinter Tales
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt, volume 1: Homeland
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt, Exile
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Shadowplague
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: First Encounters
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Down
  • Foglio, et al. – Girl Genius: Second Journey Book One: The Beast of the Rails

Graphic Novels Manga

  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 1
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 2
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 3
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner Chamber, vol. 1
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 4
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 5
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner Chamber, vol. 2
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 6
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner chamber, vol. 3
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner chamber, vol. 4
  • Anno – Sakuran: Blossoms Wild

Graphic Novel Nonfiction

  • Redniss – Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love & Fallout

Graphic Novel Nonfiction History

  • Wilson, Dickson, et al. – Fight the power!: A visual history of protest among the English-speaking peoples
  • Stavans and Alcaraz – A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States
  • Bagge – Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story

Graphic Novel Nonfiction Memoir

  • Abirached – I Remember Beirut

Graphic Novel Nonfiction  War Poetry

  • Duffy, ed. -Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics

History

  • Schivelbusch – Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants
  • Swaby – Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World

History Memoir

  • Coe – Frontier Doctor: Observations on Central Oregon & the Changing West

Literature & Language

  • Ozecki – A Tale for the Time Being
  • Adams – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, #1) [re-read]
  • Adams – The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker’s Guide, #2) [re-read]
  • Adams – Life, the Universe and Everything (Hitchhiker’s Guide, #3) [re-read]
  • Adams – So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (Hitchhiker’s Guide #4) [re-read]
  • Johnson – Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia
  • Brontë – Wuthering Heights
  • King – Euphoria [2016 DPL A Novel Idea Selection]
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2009-2011
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2012
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2013
  • Doyle – Through the Magic Door [re-read]
  • Ramsey – Thinking Like a Canyon: New and Selected Poems, 1973-2010
  • Gilbert – Collected poems [currently reading]

Literature & Language Graphic Novel War Poetry

  • Duffy, ed. – Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics [also listed above]

Philosophy

  • Wilson – Second-Hand Knowledge: An Inquiry into Cognitive Authority [on pause]
  • Wellmuth – The Nature and Origins of Scientism
  • Berlin – The Power of Ideas [currently reading]

Photography

  • Atkeson – Oregon, My Oregon
  • Atkeson & Miller – Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s
  • Atkeson – Oregon II
  • Atkeson & Ross – Oregon III
  • Marbach and Pokarney – Oregon Harvest
  • Curtis – The North American Indian: The Complete Portfolios

Renewal

  • Huang and Lynch – Thinking Body, Dancing Mind: Taosports for Extraordinary Performance in Athletics, Business, and Life [on pause]
  • Kabat-Zinn – Full Catastrophe Living: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness [currently reading]
  • Johnson – The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason [on pause]
  • Segal – Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A New Approach to Preventing Relapse [on pause]
  • Levine – Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma: The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences
  • Farhi – The Breathing Book: Good Health and Vitality Through Essential Breath Work [currently reading]
  • Frankl – Man’s Search for Meaning
  • Smalley & Winston – Fully Present: The Science, Art, and Practice of Mindfulness
  • Krznaric – How To Find Fulfilling Work
  • Black – More Anti-Inflammation Diet Tips and Recipes
  • Wahls – The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine
  • Gunaratana – Mindfulness in Plain English
  • Krucoff – Healing Yoga for Neck and Shoulder Pain: Easy, Effective Practices for Releasing Tension and Relieving Pain [on pause]
  • Moore & Gillette – Lover Within: Accessing the Lover in the Male Psyche [on pause]
  • Cooksley – Seaweed: Nature’s Secret to Balancing Your Metabolism, Fighting Disease, and Revitalizing Body and Soul [skimmed]
  • Brantley & Millstine – Five Good Minutes in Your Body [skimmed]
  • Fallon – Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook That Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats

Tech & Software

  • Kissell – Take Control of Automating Your Mac [on pause]
  • Martinez and Stager – Invent to Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom [on pause]
  • Rawlins – Slaves of the Machine: The Quickening of Computer Technology [gave up]

Final Comments

I think this slices and dices this data more than enough for me this year. I would not mind having a breakdown of authors by gender but that is loaded with many problems (multiple authors, determining gender of some, etc.) and I am not that concerned about it. I read fairly widely and try to read from a diversity of diversities, knowing that I can always do better.

I want to keep reading things in translation; I feel I did well this year. I should try to read a bit more poetry and erotica, sex & gender this year. I am satisfied with the amount of re-reading, the number of ebooks, and of nonfiction. I hope to read a few less graphic novels and more varied things in literature & language; e.g., more actual lit, more on language and more poetry as previously mentioned. Maybe some re-reading there. Poetry books are close at hand.

All in all, I’m calling 2015 a good year for me and reading. I met all of my goals, and only one of them I feel could have been more solidly met.

I am very happy to be ending some part of my 2015 with a great score for the year. Particularly happy to have the thought documented.

Here’s to your (and my) reading in 2016.

[Post(s) coming soon]

 

Atkeson – Oregon III

Oregon III by Ray Atkeson. Text by Richard Ross

Date read: 15-29 March 2015

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Cover image of Atkeson's Oregon III

Hardback, 160 pages

Published [1987] by Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company

Source: Deschutes Public Library (OVERSIZE 917.95 ATKESON RAY)

This is the third installment in the Oregon series of photo books by Ray Atkeson put out by the Graphic Arts Center Publishing. I wrote about Oregon II here and about Oregon, My Oregon here (not part of this series but extremely related).

The text is by Richard Ross, whom the back flap describes as:

“a familiar figure to television audiences. for thirty-four years he gathered and wrote news stories, delivering them nightly from the anchorman’s chair, first in Seattle and then in Portland.

With two score and seven years of interviewing experience, Ross set out to meet and write about the people of Oregon. Oregon III, a tribute to the people and the land, is the culmination of his journey around the state and is his first published work.”

This volume fixes one of my gripes with previous ones. Its sections are organized geographically: Oregon Coast, Columbia River, Western Valleys, Cascade Range, Central Oregon, and Eastern Oregon. All of the photos are in color.

Each section is preceded by several pages of text by Ross which profiles the people he met in each region. The text for the first section, Oregon Coast, left me dreading the rest “blah blah this person blah that person.” It was boring. Thankfully the Columbia River section and a couple others were far better. Those seemed to be more historical (Columbia River) or in some other way of interest to me (Central Oregon; also more historical).

No idea who wrote the captions but it is possible it was Atkeson himself.

From the funnier side of life, in the Central Oregon section:

“As for the housing market, Bob [Chandler of Bend Bulletin] says he just hired a new city editor from San Jose who bought, for $90,000, a house that is better than the one he sold for $200,000. Bob says, “You can get the best bargains in housing in the United States of America in Bend, Oregon” (129).

While, in the photo caption on p. 134, we are reminded that “Bend, with a population of just over eighteen thousand, is the county seat of Deschutes County, ….”

Um. Yeah.

The Eastern Oregon section displays a horrific insensitivity:

“This is the land once claimed by Chief Joseph as the ancestral home of his Nez Perce Indians, and one look at the scenery, no less than spectacular, will show you why the Nez Perce fought so long to keep this land. …

Grace Bartlett, whose father owned the Bend Bulletin for several years, is in her seventies and lives right across the road from her daughter’s ranch. Grace has written a lot about the relations between the Nez Perce Indians and the settlers. After the Nez Perce War and the Bannock-Payute uprising in 1878, people really started moving into this part of the country. They were mostly stockmen and farmer—vigorous people with no money, but willing to face real hardships. She says, “This is very rough country to survive in. The weather is very severe and unpredictable. It took people with a grew deal of intelligence as well as ‘guts’ to make a go of it here”” (145).

So the Nez Perce weren’t people, nor were they intelligent, nor did they have guts. What. The. Serious. Fuck!?

Anyway. I still much prefer Atkeson’s black and white work, at least as presented in Oregon, My Oregon or more narrowly in Ski & Snow Country.

This is the 19th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson – Oregon II

Oregon II by Ray Atkeson; text by Archie Satterfield

Date read: 21-26 February 2015

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Hardback, 182 pages

Published 1974 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing

Source: Deschutes Public Library [OVERSIZE 917.95 ATKESON RAY)

Not near as impressed with this as I was with Oregon, My Oregon or even Ski & Snow Country.

In those books all of the photographs were black & white and we were provided both historical and technical details by contributors highly qualified to do so. This book has only color photos and the text by Archie Satterfield consist of an eight-page essay to Oregon and, I assume, the photo captions are also by him. But in neither case do we learn anything about the historical and technical details of these photos. Or why they are even all color.

Despite carting home this heavyweight and its equally stout companion, Oregon III, and the not light but more middling-sized, Wind on the Waves, I almost did not read this. Atkeson’s color photos (based mostly on this book) simply do not draw me in like his black & white photos do. Better editorial selection? Or do I just prefer his work in b&w?

What drew me in, even though I still had to force my way through the Satterfield essay (which is OK in its own right; just not what I am looking for), was the two-page photo (pp. 8-9) of the Cascades at sunset looking west from the top of Pilot Butte. I immediately recognized the view, despite it being an “impossible” one. That is, not a human eye perspective. The photo is mostly shades of gold and browns, while the sunset silhouettes cause lots of interesting flattening in the depth-of-field. But it isn’t quite flat, not in all places. I am not going to try and describe it any further; let us just say, it has depths. Then again, I do not particularly think it is a great photo at all. It is an interesting one though.

The perspective in the photo is quite intriguing, as I hinted at. My guess, based on information on Atkeson’s technique (at least in b&w) in Oregon, My Oregon was to use the “extra” resolution of his 4×6 camera to take larger landscapes and then crop out the portion he wanted. Based on the perspective of this photo he had to do something similar. This is a piece of a much larger negative. There is no other way to compress and flatten the foreground so much without a telephoto lens which would seriously narrow the angle and we would have far less peaks in view. By the way, I talked about foreground in the previous paragraph but that is what is entirely missing from this print. The foreground of the photo has been removed in printing.

So … larger negative, piece of. Interesting. But now I want to see the whole negative. And did Atkeson compose the entire picture in the viewfinder and then still enlarge sections out or did he compose the shot he wanted and only ensure he had enough “extra” around it to do whatever he was looking for with perspective, etc.? So many questions and no hints of an answer.

By the way, there was an Oregon in 1968 by Atkeson with text by Charles H. Belding. It was “one the most successful books in the history of regional publishing, [but] has gone out of print to make way for this fresh look …” (front flap).

I liked it well enough but I simply am not roused by Atkeson’s color photos—or at least those selected for this book. I will try poking at Oregon III, which has text by Richard Ross, and at Wind on the Waves, with lots of text by Kim R. Stafford. Both of those also contain all color photos.

This is the 13th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson and Miller – Ski & Snow Country

Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s by Ray Atkeson; essay by Warren Miller

Date read: 11-12 February 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s by Ray Atkeson

Hardback, 120 pages

Published 2000 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing

Source: Deschutes Public Library (796.93 ATKESON RAY)

Another excellent collection of 100 black & white images of Atkeson’s ski and snow pictures. Based on technique alone these images ought get 5 stars but as the title suggests the focus is narrower than in Oregon, My Oregon and skiing is not something I ever took up. In fact, this book has been quite educational to see how short of a period of time good equipment for the masses has actually been available. I must admit the tug of some of the action shots but I think it’s beyond the time I might take up downhill skiing. Perhaps cross-country at some point but we need to use our snowshoes more first. Not that we’ve had much opportunity this winter whether we wanted to or not.

The introductory essay is by Warren Miller, famous skiing filmmaker. The two became friends in 1949, meeting in Squaw Valley. The essay was written in 2000 and as the note to readers says on the title page verso:

“There are undoubtedly some errors in dates, time, and places in this book due to most events happening fifty or more years ago. I have tried to be as accurate as my memory of the events and the occasional phone call for verification allows. — Warren Miller”

Highly recommended, especially for fans of skiing, skiers, those interested in the early decades of skiing in the western US, and anyone who simply enjoys black & white photos of snow (and often other things along with the snow).

This is the 10th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson – Oregon, My Oregon

Oregon, My Oregon by Ray Atkeson; essay by Catherine Glass; compilation, photo editing & printing and research by Thomas Robinson

Date read: 05 February 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of Atkeson's Oregon, My Oregon

Hardback, 128 pages

Published 1998 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing in cooperation with the Oregon Historical Society

Source: Central Oregon Community College Barber Library. (F 877 .A797 1998) My wife has checked it out.

I discovered this gem of a portrait of my adopted state by one of its preeminent photographers because my wife has it checked out along with other Oregon/Central Oregon books.

The photos are all black and white and are from the late 1920s to the 1960s, past the time Atkeson had become famous for his color photography too. The photo captions were researched and written by photo compiler, printer and historian Tom Robinson and provide a fair bit of context. Photos from Atkeson’s commercial work, his freelance work and work he simply shot for his own pleasure are all represented. Together they paint a fascinating portrait of several decades of industry, travel, sport, portraiture and landscape in Oregon.

“Tom Robinson researched the photos included in Oregon, My Oregon by reviewing hundreds of thousands of Photo Art Studio negatives housed in the collections of the Oregon Historical Society and the more than ten thousand negatives in the Atkeson family collection. Examining each negative on a light table with a television camera set up to reverse the image from a negative to a positive on the monitor, Tom selected four hundred. Then he took the negatives to his darkroom and printed them. His circa 1940s enlarger, which he describes as “a behemoth Saltzmann that weighs almost as much as a small car,” is generally regarded as the finest large-format enlarger. He had it fitted with new Nikkor lenses and a multicontrast light head.

His mission was demanding and complex: modern printing techniques do not apply to old negatives, the old negatives do not fit modern paper, their very sensitive emulsions are often on the crumbling edge of disintegration, and they require darkroom gymnastics to address their density ranges. Nevertheless, Tom Robinson met these and other challenges, in addition to researching and writing the captions” (from “Ray Atkeson in Black and White” by Catherine Glass, 16).

My favorites:

  • Farm Photo, circa 1947-1948. Young boy carrying big bag of hops to the barn in Marion County (17).
  • Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer, April 17, 1940. PBR truck, cases of beer and salesmen in front of the distributors (1537 Southeast Grand Ave., Portland) (20).
  • Desert Road, 1944-1945. Near Burns, Oregon (30).
  • Windstorm at Timberline, 1955. Shot by his wife, Mira (37).
  • Columbia Steel Casting, Machinery and Operations, July 25, 1944 (Portland’s Montavilla neighborhood) (53).
  • Mary Carroll, 1942 (May’ve been one of the two first women to work in America’s maritime shipyards) (55).
  • Threshing Grass, circa 1945, Grande Ronde Valley (62).
  • 301 Restaurant, April 28, 1943 (African-American club; now the I-84 eastbound entrance from I-5 northbound) (68).
  • Jacksonville Cemetery, 1945. Jacksonville, Oregon (70).
  • Horse-seining, 1945. Using horses to seine for salmon at Astoria (86).
  • Smith Rocks and Crooked River, circa May 1936 (94).
  • Vanport Flood, May 31, 1948. What was Vanport, Oregon (102)
  • Eagle Creek Punchbowl, early 1940s. (111).
  • Art and Howie Doing a Double Geländsprung, circa 1948. Resort at Anthony Lakes (117).
  • Herringbone Tracks, circa 1940. Salmon River Canyon on Mount Hood (119).

Many of the photographs, whether favorites or not, are technical masterpieces based on a keen eye, an intimate study of light, and a willingness and determination to be in the right spot at the right time. Many are testaments to times and places no longer here, while also making strong social statements. Granted those statements may be vastly different than the ones they may’ve made when shot decades ago but that does nothing to lessen the impact of a photo such as 301 Restaurant or Vanport Flood then and today.

I can only begin to imagine what stories are told in the 100,000+ extant photos held by the Oregon Historical Society and those of the Atkeson family. I am looking forward to checking out more of his books.

May be my 2nd favorite book of photography by a single artist. Elliott Erwitt’s Personal Exposures is probably my favorite.

Highly recommend for fans of Oregon and fans of individual photographers who excelled at most every form of photography extant during their career.

This is the 6th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Books read in 2014

So I read a boatload of books in 2014. I gave up on quite a few and a few are on hold to pick back up another time. I am not even going to try to account for those in the last two categories this year. It seems I read and finished 80 books this year.

[Updated 31 December 2014 – see bottom]

As for those finished I was hoping to link to my 2014 Goodreads Challenge shelf but it seems only Goodreads members can see my pages. This goddamned job of listing books has never really gotten any easier or any better. Can I just get a righteous “Fuck me!” here? Zotero and Open Library all have their (major) issues for this task. Open Library so much so that I stopped using it after last year.

Yep. I was correct. It started out as a nightmare but I got it whipped reasonably. After a goodly break away from it.

Here is the list of books I read in 2014 by title, author(s – not complete) and date finished. Almost all are in Goodreads but there are a couple I have not yet entered, as in added the book to the catalog. I am definitely growing disillusioned with Goodreads too. Not directly because of Amazon but they are now in charge of maintenance and updates so it is their boat to float or not. My biggest gripe right now is the damnable conflation of editions. I haven’t quite nailed down exactly what it is doing but I do not like it. It may be new too; I’m not sure.

I divided the list up by broad topics and listed the books in the order finished within a group.

Title, Author(s), Date Finished

Graphic Novels
Raise The Dead Hardcover (Raise the Dead), Leah Moore & John Reppion, 1/1/2014
Atomic Robo and the Fightin’ Scientists of Tesladyne (Atomic Robo, #1), Brian Clevinger & Scott Wegener, 2/26/2014
Atomic Robo and the Dogs of War (Atomic Robo, #2), Brian Clevinger & Scott Wegener, 2/27/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 1: Back on the Street (Transmetropolitan, #1), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertston & Garth Ennis, 3/12/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 2: Lust for Life (Transmetropolitan, #2), Warren Ellis & Darick Robertson, 3/15/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 3: Year of the Bastard, Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson & Rodney Ramos, 3/18/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 4: The New Scum (Transmetropolitan, #4), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson, Rodney Ramos & Keith Akin, 3/25/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 5: Lonely City (Transmetropolitan, #5), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson, Rodney Ramos & Patrick Stewart, 3/26/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 6: Gouge Away (Transmetropolitan, #6), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson & Rodney Ramos, 4/9/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 7: Spider’s Thrash (Transmetropolitan, #7), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson, Rodney Ramos & Darren Aronofsky, 4/10/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 10: One More Time (Transmetropolitan, #10), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson& Rodney Ramos, 4/20/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 8: Dirge (Transmetropolitan, #8), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson & Rodney Ramos, 4/21/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 9: The Cure (Transmetropolitan, #9), Warren Ellis, Darick Robertson & Rodney Ramos, 5/7/2014
Transmetropolitan, Vol. 0: Tales of Human Waste (Transmetropolitan, #0), Warren Ellis, et al., 5/13/2014
Age of Bronze Volume 1: A Thousand Ships, Eric Shanower, 7/17/2014
Planetary, Vol. 2: The Fourth Man, Warren Ellis & John Cassaday, 7/26/2014
Planetary, Vol. 1: All Over the World and Other Stories, Warren Ellis, John Cassaday & Alan Moore, 7/26/2014
Planetary Vol. 4: Spacetime Archaeology, Warren Ellis & John Cassaday, 7/27/2014
Planetary, Vol. 3: Leaving the 20th Century, Warren Ellis & John Cassaday, 7/27/2014
Planetary: Crossing Worlds, Warren Ellis, et al., 7/30/2014
Crossing Midnight, Vol. 1: Cut Here, Mike Carey, et al., 11/10/2014
The Unwritten: Tommy Taylor and the Ship That Sank Twice, Mike Carey & Peter Gross, 11/14/2014
The Unwritten, Vol. 8: Orpheus in the Underworld, Mike Carey, Peter Gross, & Dean Ormston, 11/16/2014
Crossing Midnight, Vol. 2: A Map of Midnight, Mike Carey, et al., 11/18/2014
Crossing Midnight, Vol. 3: The Sword in the Soul, Mike Carey, et al., 11/20/2014

Beer and Brewing
Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Beer, Maureen Ogle, 1/9/2014
Short Course in Beer: An Introduction to Tasting and Talking about the World’s Most Civilized Beverage, Lynn Hoffman, 2/27/2014
Extreme Brewing: An Enthusiast’s Guide to Brewing Craft Beer at Home, Sam Calagion & Kevin Fleming, 2/18/2014
Vintage Beer: Discover Specialty Beers That Improve with Age, Patrick Dawson, 3/9/2014
A Year in Food and Beer: Recipes and Beer Pairings for Every Season, Emily Baime & Darin Michaels, 3/13/2014
Brewing 2nd ed., Ian S Hornsey, 4/22/2014
Beer: A Quality Perspective, Charles W. Bamforth, et al., 6/25/2014
Dinner in the Beer Garden, Lucy Saunders, 6/27/2014
Beer and Skittles, Richard Boston, 7/4/2014
Beer, Michael James Jackson, 7/17/2014
Beer: The Story Of The Pint: The History Of Britain’s Most Popular Drink, Martyn Cornell, 8/20/2014
The Unbearable Nonsense of Craft Beer – A Rant in Nine Acts, Max Bahnson & Alan McLeod, 8/25/2014 (ebook)
Three Sheets to the Wind: One Man’s Quest for the Meaning of Beer, Pete Brown, 9/15/2014
Evaluating Beer, Publications Brewer, Elizabeth Gold, 9/23/2014
Beer and Brewing (National Conference on Quality Beer and Brewing #8), Virginia Thomas, 10/28/2014
Red, White, and Brew: An American Beer Odyssey, Brian Yaeger, 11/9/2014

Literature / Language
The Best American Poetry 2013, David Lehman, 1/19/2014
Dog Songs, Mary Oliver, John Burgoyne, 1/21/2014
13 Ways of Happily, Emily Carr, 4/23/2014
Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Truman Capote, 4/27/2014
Thomas Sebeok and the Signs of Life, Susan Petrilli, 5/2/2014
These Mountains That Separate Us: An East/West Dialogue Poem, Jack e Lorts, 11/4/2014
The Next American Essay, John D’Agata & Guy Davenport, 11/10/2014
The Romantic Dogs, Roberto Bolaño, Laura Healy, 11/22/2014

Technology and Software
Take Control of 1Password, Joe Kissell, 2/12/2014 (ebook)
Take Control of Scrivener 2, Kirk McElhearn, 10/14/2014 (ebook)
Take Control of Upgrading to Yosemite 1.0 and 1.2, Joe Kissell, 10/30/2014 (ebook)

Erotica / Sex & Gender
Hurts So Good: Unrestrained Erotica, Alison Tyler, 2/26/2014
Mommy’s Little Girl: On Sex, Motherhood, Porn, and Cherry Pie, Susie Bright, 4/7/2014 (ebook)
Sexual Fitness: The Ultimate Guide to Pump While You Hump, Tone While You Bone and Shred in the Bed, D.J. Gugenheim, et al., 6/23/2014
Candy, Terry Southern, Mason Hoffenberg, 6/24/2014
Wetter, Harper Bliss, 7/24/2014 (ebook)

Photography
Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers, Richard Renaldi, 6/16/2014
Focus on Food Photography for Bloggers (Focus on Series): Focus on the Fundamentals, Matt Armendariz, 6/16/2014
Dancers Among Us: A Celebration of Joy in the Everyday, Jordan Matter, 9/30/2014
Portraits of Time: Ancient Trees from Around the World, Beth Moon, 12/15/2014

YA and Children’s
How the Stars Fell into the Sky: A Navajo Legend, Jerrie Oughton, Lisa Desimini, 3/18/2014
Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors, Hena Khan & Mehrdokht Amini, 3/21/2014
Godless, Pete Hautman, 9/8/2014
Between the Spark and the Burn (Between, #2), April Genevieve Tucholke, 9/21/2014
The Daylight Gate, Jeanette Winterson, 10/24/2014
Collected Children’s Stories, Sylvia Plath, 10/29/2014

Assorted
Atlas of the Pacific Northwest, Philip L. Jackson, 3/3/2014
The Age of Wonder, Richard Holmes, 4/23/2014 (ebook)
The Foods of the Greek Islands: Cooking and Culture at the Crossroads of the Mediterranean, Aglaia Kremezi, 4/27/2014
Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols, & Other Typographical Marks, Keith Houston, 10/13/2014
The Body: An Essay, Jenny Boully, 10/19/2014
Copyflow: Typesetting Procedures for Book Composition, George Z. Kunkel, 11/1/2014
A Pocket Philosophical Dictionary, Voltaire, 11/1/2014 (ebook)
How to Think More About Sex, Alain de Botton, 11/2/2014
Really Big Numbers, Richard Evan Schwartz, 11/4/2014
How to Live: A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer, Sarah Bakewell, 11/14/2014 (ebbok / together)
Francis of Assisi and His World (IVP Histories), Mark Galli, 12/2/2014
Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings: Save Money, Save the Earth, Jennifer Thorne Amann, Katie Ackerly & Alex Wilson, 12/16/2014

Currently Reading
Tortillas: A Cultural History, Paula Morton
Take Control of Automating Your Mac, Joe Kissell
Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom, Syliva Martinez (ebook)
A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams, Michael Pollan (reading to Sara)
Craft Beer World, Mark Dredge

I don’t expect to finish any of these but something else could possibly be read. No worries, I say. I’m calling it books read this year. Not perfect but very close.

31 December 2014 Update

I did finish a couple more books. Sara brought home a new(er) Warren Ellis, et al. graphic novel, Moon Knight (v. 1): From the Dead with which I wasn’t too impressed. I finished (or as much I am going to) Craft Beer Beer by Dredge. And just this morning I finished Morton on Tortillas. Goodreads now says I have read 81 of 75 books for my 2014 Challenge but again there are at least three that are not in Goodreads.

Thoughts on book-spine poetry and a meta-poem

Recently I started writing (composing? arranging?) book-spine poems. I have been aware of them for a while now but have never tried them. Library Thing has, for instance, done it, and they seem to be inspired by Nina Katchadourian and her Sorted Books project.

I was recently reminded of them and inspired to try my hand at them by @admcgregor3 who I met through DigiWRiMo. Here is the post he shared that nudged me to tryHere is another.

I asked him whether there were any rules (that he followed) and he said “no rules. I just do what I think fits…”.

So here are my thoughts on what I am doing; no real rules but some guidelines for now:

  • Books are stacked from top to bottom—may try some left to right vertically—in reading order.
  • They may or may not have a title.
  • Use the pages side (opposite the spine) of a book as spacer between title and poem or between stanzas or for whatever reason I need space.
  • Subtitles will be generally ignored, although I am free to use as I like.
  • Punctuation may be added freely at the ends of lines but, for now, I will retain punctuation present in a spine title.
  • Generally, one title per line of the poem but free to do as I please.

I also could not resist making a book-spine poem about book-spine poetry, a sort of meta-poem, if you will:

This delicious madness (image 1) - pile of books

This delicious madness (image 1)

This delicious madness (image 2) - another pile of books

This delicious madness (image 2)

This delicious madness

Signs of writing
Describing language;
Mediated
Mimesis.

Reverence
Connected
The image
Beyond snapshots.

Seeking meaning,
Man and his symbols
Desire
Figures of thought.

This craft of verse:
Transformations,
Evidence,
The contrast.

How it seems to me:
Verses and versions
Shout out
The art of looking sideways.

My poems so far:

And to see some others around the interwebz just do a Google Image search for book-spine poetry (with or without the hyphen).

No idea how far I’ll take this or how long I’ll continue to putter with it but I have lots and lots of book titles at hand to work with.