Dembecki, et al. – Trickster

Trickster: Native American Tales: a Graphic Collection by Matt Dembecki and many others
Date read: 12-13 February 2017
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2017gnc

Cover image of Trickster: Native American Tales: a Graphic Collection by Matt Dembecki and many others

Paperback, 231 pages
Published 2010 by Fulcrum Books
Source: Deschutes Public Library [Graphic Novel TRICKSTER]

Sara brought this home a while back and it looked interesting. It was.

There are 21 tales represented here by various adaptors and artists. The differing styles of art are either a plus or a minus depending on whether you appreciate more or less of them. I generally did appreciate most of them so it was a bonus for me.

Being Native American trickster tales they generally center on coyote, rabbit, raccoon and raven, although sometimes the trickster does take human form.

At least 25 of the 44 adaptors and illustrators are of Native American descent based on the bios at the back.

Recommended for anyone interested in an assortment of Native American trickster tales.

This met “A book about a different faith or religion” from my 2017 “looking all around” challenge.

This is the 8th book in my 2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge [2017gnc]

Image for 2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel & Manga Reading Challenge

Designed by Nicola Mansfield

 

Piskor – Hip Hop Family Tree, v. 1

Hip Hop Family Tree: 1970s-1981, v.1, Fantagraphics Treasury edition by Ed Piskor
Date read: 24-26 April 2017
My rating: Leaving unrated
Challenges: 2017gnc, 2017nfc, 2017poss

Cover image of Hip Hop Family Tree: 1970s-1981, v.1, Fantagraphics Treasury edition by Ed Piskor

Library binding, 112 pages
Published 2016 by Fantagraphics; Fifth Fantagraphics Books edition
Source: Central Oregon Community College Barber Library [ML3531 .P37 1970-1981 v.1

This is what I wrote in Goodreads regarding this book:

I am not going to rate this as I am completely unqualified to rate it. I recognize a few names and a few song titles but most of this is all new to me and as succinctly as it is presented–is it even really a narrative?–provides me no additional info really. I was looking forward to the other volumes and maybe the narrative gets a bit more expansive but this was the early history and the more important to my [lack of] knowledge, in my opinion, so moving on.

I did enjoy it in a sense but with so little grounding in the culture of hip hop this title failed to provide me any real grounding. I have been using graphic novels the last couple of years to explore topics that I may not be ready or willing (with so many other interests) to read a standard, prose, nonfiction book on; e.g.,

These, and several others, have been variable in their ability to inform [entertain/surprise/…] me, but all were better than this one for me.

Recommended for fans of hip hop or folks with some knowledge of the genre and its artists but who want a bit more. I am not saying it is a bad book, just that it did not do what I needed it to do for me to get a better appreciation (and knowledge) of hip hop. No doubt it works better if you have a bit more of a starting background knowledge/awareness.

This is the 9th 7th book in my 2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge [2017gnc]

Image for 2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel & Manga Reading Challenge

Designed by Nicola Mansfield

This is the 20th book read and 8th reviewed in my in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge 2017 [2017nfc].

I have read 11 books so far this year in my 2017 Books To Read Challenge (personal) [2017poss] but this is the first to be reviewed. That eleven includes this title and one I finished this morning, though. I have also read from 8 of the 16 different categories so far. Goal is “to complete 2 from each of the 16 categories and a total of 35.” Two categories are “complete” in that sense, re-reads (2) and beer and brewing (3), but that doesn’t mean I won’t read another book on those lists.

 

My Pilot Butte story

Carol Smith asked folks to share their Pilot Butte stories if so inspired. Here’s my still ongoing story:

I don’t have a Pilot Butte story but I do consider myself to be working on one.

After moving to Bend in August 2012 we climbed Pilot Butte but then gave it little thought. On January 1st 2014 we had hiked to the summit with an acquaintance for sunrise in 6°F weather and snow on the ground. We attempted another sunrise hike on January 1st 2015 but our timing was a bit late so we stopped part way up and watched the sunrise from an east-facing bench. We tried to do it this year but a temperature inversion had kept a good bit of pollution in so we (reluctantly) passed.

In mid-2014 I had some fully unexpected health issues arise. After almost 9 months and no real answers from doctors as to what the issue was I decided to try eating healthier and to try to get back to exercising.

In the past I was primarily a runner, even if any extremely fair weather one. Along with being an on-and-off one over the years. I knew my frame was not strong enough for running so decided I could use the butte since it is so handy. We live 0.65 mi from the the backside Lafayette Street park entrance. I tried doing the summit once or twice but that almost completely broke me so I switched to the base trail, which I fell in love with.

I got so good at it that last year my times just kept dropping and dropping. Eventually in later summer, I walked the 3.03 mi, from home to the base trail around and back home, in an average of 12:00 miles. This includes a fair bit of up and down. Yes, the down helps lower the uphill times but there’s still a lot of uphill.

Early this year, after some physical therapy for structural issues last fall, I began summiting. Now most of my hikes include both the base trail and the summit. I have even now worked up to twice around the base trail and once to the summit and back for three laps, and once so far I managed a 2×2 with a base, summit, base, summit hike for endurance.

I have ran/walked the base trail a couple times over last fall and this year so far. A couple weeks ago I ran/walked the summit and earlier today I ran/walked the Pilot Butte Challenge course. It was still far tougher than I would like but I also know I have a long, long way to go to be in good shape.

Clearly I have to do other things than hike to get there but Pilot Butte has been a major instrument in getting me there. It is full of an ever-cycling profusion of wildlife, be it plants or animals. The views are incredible and inspiring, be it the gorgeous Cascades to the west, the hills on the way, Newberry Caldera in the south, the austere beauty of eastern Oregon, or the grandeur of Smith Rock and Mount Hood to the north.

I now have 442 miles in the Pilot Butte Century Club since ~March 2014. Some people summit 4-5 times a day, almost every day. I would like to be able to do that too, although it would only be a once in a while thing for me, I think. If I can do that hike then I would probably prefer to get out and do more of the amazing hikes in and around Bend than I have so far.

I will keep hiking Pilot Butte whether it is the base trail or the base and summit. In the winter I will take the road when I have to.

Maybe Pilot Butte isn’t fully responsible for saving my life but it has been a major factor in my renewal. I am so very thankful that it is as close as it is to us so I can walk to it and back. It is a massive inspiration and I love its trails. The butte is there. Has been and will be for a long, long time. Perhaps it’s that love that has saved me.


My other 10 or so Pilot Butte posts can be found here.

 

Brrémaud and Bertolucci – Love, volume 2: The Fox

Love, volume 2: The Fox by Frédéric Brrémaud and Federico Bertolucci

Date read: 17 January 2016
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016gnc

Cover image of Brrémaud and Bertolucci - Love, volume 2: The Fox

Hardback, 74+ pages
Published 2015 by Magnetic Press (first published in France in 2011 by Ankama Editions)
Source: Deschutes Public Library

Highly recommended for all ages. But in a bit of social responsibility I will quote the ratings sticker: “This book contains depictions of violence and survival within nature. It is intended for ALL AGES.” So perhaps if you don’t want to explain a pod of killer whales attacking a baby whale and its mother to your young child or grandchild then wait a couple years. They may well miss some of that anyway. They won’t miss the two bears fighting though. Or the ….

It says it was written by Brrémaud and illustrated by Bertolucci. I guess they mean storyboarded or such as there is no story in the strong sense and there are no words, except for an epigraph and epilogue. But it is full of amazingly gorgeous illustrations of assorted animals and their varied habitats. There is conflict, terror, natural disaster, violence and the turning away of violence. And there is love.

The illustrations pay dividends by spending time with them. Even so, it is can be a fairly quick read by oneself. With a child on one’s lap or by your side it could take hours. That would be a grand thing; but only if you are prepared to explain some of the natural world to your young charge.

There is also a Love: The Tiger as the first “in a series of wildlife books, each focusing on a day in the life of a different wild animal across different natural habitats. I think I’ll try to get my hands on that one also. Yep. Just placed a request from Deschutes Public Library. According to Goodreads there is a 3rd volume out, Love: The Lion, but it may only be in French for now.

Highly recommended. One of the most beautiful looking books I have read in a long.

This is the 5th book in my 2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge Sign-Ups

On why Aesop’s Fables

I wanted to make myself a quick note so I could remember in the future why I chose to re-read Aesop’s fables in the upcoming immediate future.

Friday morning (Jan. 15, 2016) I wrote this in my journal:

“11:12 AM Just had my third Aesop’s reference this morning! The beer place, Brontë, and now my crossword.”

I figured the universe was trying to send me a message of some kind so on Friday afternoon while at work I grabbed myself a copy of Aesop, Five Centuries of Illustrated Fables, selected by John J. McKendry and published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1964.

My first reference came via Facebook to the article “Napa’s Mad Fritz brewery stakes out new terroir” in the San Francisco Chronicle. Mad Fritz’s beers are named after specific fables from Aesop, such as The Larks in the Corn, or The Viper and File. All in all, the brewery and beers sound fantastic and I might have to put a little effort into getting my hands on some. The labels are also beautifully illustrated and “The moral takeaway is noted on the back label.”

My second reference came while reading further in Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. On page 95 of the Oxford World’s Classics edition we read,

“If life promised no enjoyment within my vocation, at least it offered no allurements out of it; and, henceforth, I would put my shoulder to the wheel* and toil away, like any poor drudge of a cart-horse that was fairly broken in to its labour, and plod through life, not wholly useless if not agreeable, and uncomplaining if not contented with my lot.”

In the Explanatory Notes on p. 424 we learn that “put my shoulder to the wheel” is a “proverbial expression, from Aesop’s fable of Hercules and the waggoner. ODEP, 729.” [ODEP is the Oxford Dictionary of English Proverbs, 3rd edn. (1971).

The third reference came as I waiting on my sandwich bread to toast for lunch. I was working on the 2 September 2015 Los Angeles Times crossword when 65 across popped up with “Greek storyteller” as the hint and who, of course, should be the answer? Our friend Aesop.

I’m not one much for “signs” but something was prodding me here.

I went with it. I hope that I can find what it is the universe may have been pointing at.

I have since seen several other Aesop references but that is the way these things go, isn’t it?

My Story, My Terms: Unofficial CV activity [DigiWriMo 2015]

DigiWriMo, which I am doing again this November, has asked that I Reconsider Me: to compose in some manner an unCV to introduce myself.

I have decided to go with song titles as the section headings of a table of contents, mostly comprised of song titles.

[N.B. I only got part way through the library and ignored large swaths along that road too. Titles should in most cases be taken as only the title and not as the content of the song; except when not. Most of these songs are quite meaningful to me but I may be twisting the heck out of that meaning with how I am using it here. Song titles are in italics. Performers will be listed at the end broken into sections.]

Ready Or NotThis Box Contains the Ballad of a Thin Man.

Table of Contents:

Industrial Disease [2014-present]

     Heavy Fuel

     So They Say

     Don’t Let Us Get Sick

     Here Come Those Tears Again        

     Dazed and Confused

     All Tore Down

     Changes

     Poor Poor Pitiful Me

     It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)

     There’ll Be Some Changes Made

     The Distance

Setting Me Up [2015 goals]

     The Things I’ve Gone & Done

     Mutineeer

     You Tripped At Every Step

     Or Down You Fall

     Wicked Game

     Effigy

     Every Thing Happens to Me

     Ain’t That The Way

     Just One of Those Things

     You Painted Yourself In 

What I Am

     So Madly In Love  

     Almost Blue

     The Naming of Things

     21st Century Schizoid Man

     Moody Fucker

     Wishing For Contentment

     Searching For A Heart

     On the Border

     My Mind is Ramblin’

     Sorry I Am

     I Drink Beer

     Rebel Rebel

     32 Flavors

     Sittin’ and Thinkin’

     Reckoning

     Wondr’ing Aloud

     Pissed

     I’m a Stranger Here

     Little Earthquakes

     Strange

     Something Beautiful  

     Existential Exile

     Cause Cheap Is How I Feel

     Battered Old Bird

     Damaged From the Start

     Fuzzy Freaky

     Fuck, I Hate the Cold

     Howlin’ at the Moon

     In Love But Not at Peace

     It’s a War in There

     Calling the Moon

     Here For Now            

     Writing in the Margins   

     Willin’

From the Ashes [Aspirations]

     Don’t Get Trouble on Your Mind

     Get Up Stand Up

     Ripple

     Fierce Flawless

     Mercy of the Fallen

     Learn to Be Still

     I Love Myself Today

     Work Your Way Out

     Remember

     Revelling

     Don’t Be Afraid of Your Anger

     Evolve

     With My Own Two Hands

     New Dawn Coming

     All the Best                     

     Why Worry

     Slowness

     Breathe Deep        

     Wake Up Dreaming

     I Wish You Peace

This is me. Some sides of me, more honestly. Clearly, it has been a rough last year and a half. Trying to amble into the future as it comes.

Looking forward to DigiWriMo this year.

Cast List, in Order:

Warren Zevon, The Fugees, Ani DiFranco, Bob Dylan

Dire Straits: Dire Straits, Cowboy Junkies, Warren Zevon, Jackson Browne, Led Zeppelin, Johnny Winter, Becky Chace (and others; e.g. Bowie), Warren Zevon, Bob Dylan, Chet Atkins & Mark Knopfler, Cake

Dire Straits: Carrie Newcomer, Warren Zevon, Elvis Costello, Gil Scot-Heron, Chris Isaak, Andrew Bird (or Natalie Merchant), Lightnin’ Hopkins, Ani DiFranco, Anita O’Day, Jolie Holland

Edie Brickell: Georgia Gibbs, Elvis Costello, Andrew Bird, King Crimson, Lambchop, Andrew Bird, Warren Zevon, Al Stewart, Howlin’ Wolf, Ani DiFranco, Dan Reeder, David Bowie, Ani DiFranco, Elvis Costello, Ani DiFranco, Jethro Tull, bitch and animal, Lambchop, Carrie Newcomer, Elvis Costello, Clem Snide, Conjure One, Cowboy Junkies, Eric Clapton, Dar Williams, Cowboy Junkies, David Byrne, Cowboy Junkies, The Chenille Sisters, Dar Williams, Ani DiFranco, Dar Williams, John Gorka, Little Feat

Rosanne Cash: Jolie Holland, Bob Marley, Grateful Dead, Ani DiFranco, Dar Williams, Eagles, Bif Naked, Ani DiFranco, Jolie Holland, Ani DiFranco, Clem Snide, Ani DiFranco, Ben Harper, Cowboy Junkies, John Prine, Dire Straits, Calexico, Lambchop, Little Feat, Eagles

Hubert and Kerascoët – Beauty

Beauty by Hubert and Kerascoët. Translation by Joe Johnson.

Date read: 10-11 January 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Beauty by Hubert and Kerascoët

Cover of Beauty by Hubert and Kerascoët

Hardback, 150 pages

Published 2014 by Comics Lit / NBM. Originally published in French as Beautë

Our public library puts on a Second Sunday event on the 2nd Sunday of each month which mostly focuses on poetry and local/regional authors. We go frequently. In December it was fairy tales and myths:

“What if Gretel stayed in the forest? What does Death do on vacation? Come to the dark and delicious side of the folk stories you know and love, with Bend poets Suzanne Burns and Judith Montgomery.”

After the author’s talk there is always an open mic so I brought my slightly twisted take on beauty that I wrote on 9 January 2012 (Hmm. Almost exactly 3 years ago). I was taking a Grimm’s Fairy Tales course during January term at Briar Cliff with our friend Jeanne Emmons and we had just read Snow-White and Rose-Red. Jeanne thought it was a bit too much of a mashup of multiple tales but I am quite pleased with drawing on more. These tales should be cautionary but were turned into further means of repression.

“Beauty”

‘And none is so fair as she.’

Beauty for its own sake, enticement.
Or is it really entrapment?

“White as snow, red as blood,
black as the wood of the window-frame.”

The hunter spares her …
The wicked queen poisons her …
The dwarves domesticate her …
The prince wants her …
            lifeless and mute.

Little Snow-White,
A maiden on the edge
Of womanhood.

Lost in the forest.
House full of men.
“Pretty things to sell,
very cheap, very cheap.”
Silk stay-laces, loss of breath.
Noisome comb, senselessness.
Poisoned apple, death lodged in the throat.

Inaminate, features softened.
On display, in a glass coffin.
She is bartered cheaply, for a
princeling’s honor.

Gentleness, purity, innocence
Retained. As are the ability
To inspire desirous want and envy.
These are the steps to
Make oneself a woman.
Chaste, yet chargedly erotic.

Beauty.

==  ==

What am I supposed to say about this book? It speaks to those once cautionary tales while being one itself. There is far less eroticism than I expected. The blind enslavement by beauty is pretty much the opposite of erotic. While not for children it may be good for perceptive teens (My children have not been teens for almost half their life now so take my suggestion for what it’s worth).

I marked it down one star as it seemed to drag on somehow. I was enjoying the story but as many pages as I was turning I was progressing far slower than I thought I was. That seems odd.

This is the 17th book in my GN2015

This book meets the “A book with a love triangle” and “A book with magic” criteria for Another Reading Challenge 2015. The New Deadwardians may have met the magic criteria but it is questionable as to whether it is magic in that sense or in the sleight-of-hand and its relatives way so I didn’t count it. This has fairies and spells.

Kick-Off Surroundings

I was unable to participate in the Digital Writing Month Launch Party celebration so this is my response, particularly to the Kick-Off Surroundings bit.

The kick-off happened at 12:01AM UTC 1 November which was 5 pm Halloween here in Oregon. I had just closed the library at a few minutes after and then had to catch a bus to the bottom of the hill to meet some folks. I was also having a discussion with one of my usual patrons while waiting. I did check my phone for the kick-off post and had a quick look. Saw I wouldn’t get any done on time. No worries. I was with friends and had a good grip on ideas already.

We were supposed to accomplish three tasks within the 1st hour:

  • Who are you? Post a Vine to Twitter, due by 20 min.
  • Where are you? [Environment] 3 photos to Twitter, due by 40 min.
  • What are you going to do? [Goals] Roster and abridged version to Twitter

I was not going to bother with the first. Just not interested. And that’s OK. “The point is creation; the method to the madness is up to you.” Sean Michael Morris in Invention, Ambition, Fearlessness: Digital Writing Month 2014

Sure. The idea is to push one’s boundaries, creativity, and so forth. I plan on doing that. And while I may well ignore some of the prompts and perhaps not participate in everything, I did the same last time. Some of the new things I did to push my limits worked and some didn’t. That’s OK, too.

This post serves as my Kick-Off Environment post, which stands in way “late” for the three tweets. I did post my goals to the roster and had earlier tweeted my goals but did so again. It was definitely after the party was over by a couple hours but not many folks got to that part anyway.

Photo #1

Dr. Evelyn Crook and Mistress Quantum Sum before Halloween tarot readings for the Humane Society at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café.

Dr. Evelyn Crook and Mistress Quantum Sum before Halloween tarot readings for the Humane Society at Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café. [somewhat processed]

Sara and Emily prior to giving their first readings of the night. They were doing Halloween tarot readings for charity at our local, Broken Top Bottle Shop & Ale Café (BTBS). When I got there, Sara was with three of our friends who I joined until they headed out. Not a whole lot later another couple friends, along with two more new-to-me friends, joined me for much of the evening. While we love BTBS we do not spend many Friday evenings there. Halloween was a lot more mellow than I figured it’d be though.

Photo #2

Cooler case and BTBS sign [heavily processed]

Cooler case and BTBS sign [heavily processed]

I am (consciously) unclear as to what this image means to me or the story I am trying to tell. I have an as yet undiagnosed illness, since this summer, that is playing havoc with me in many ways. For some reason this appealed to me. I, and Sara, spend a lot of time in front of these colors. They are a refuge, of sorts. This image is anything but refuge-like though. The unprocessed image is. So. This. Is a story element. Yet to be fully realized.

Photo #3

Temperance tarot card [little processing]

Temperance tarot card [little processing]

For the significance of this photo you will have to read my next post, which is thankfully 95% written already. Past me doing current me a favor [Wickett’s Law/Rule].

This was a large part of my environment for the kick-off of Digital Writing Month 2014.

Temperance. Am going to have to spend some time with that concept.

The Tree of Life (movie)

[This is one of the remaining DigiWriMo posts.]

On Black Friday, we finally got around to seeing The Tree of Life, which was a pretty big movie not that long ago. I knew a little about it—that it was fairly existential, had (at least) two major interpretations, was well-acted, and beautifully shot—and I had been looking forward to it.

At less than a half hour in I tweeted the following:

Is The Tree of Life worth watching? <30:00 in & I’m bored to tears and falling asleep. Decent nature photography but … [tweet]

It was putting me to sleep and I really was not impressed in much of any way yet. Sure, there was some great “nature” cinematography but much of it seemed to be NASA images or stuff taken from assorted nature documentaries; the stuff that wasn’t simply CGI, that is, or ginned up in more analog ways. Seeing as I get the NASA Image of the Day in my feeds and I am fairly well-versed in nature documentaries they were going to have to do better.

I sat through the whole movie, despite Sara suggesting I go upstairs and write. When it was over I tweeted:

Um, The Tree of Life is one of the worst films I have seen. Pretty sure @esquetee has a different opinion of it. Oh well. [tweet]

It is not that there was little action, as I adore so-called ‘foreign’ and independent films, many of which most Americans cannot sit through due to lack of action. That is not a problem I have. Storytelling is what is important and I guess, for me, the issue was that there really isn’t a story in it.

Honestly, to me, as a whole, this movie seriously sucked. Sara liked it. As she said, it is open to interpretation—which I fully agree with. But we even seemed to disagree on how many boys the family had. The problem with such a work that is so open to interpretation is that it has to give you something to work with, something you can hang an idea, and perhaps an argument, on. In my opinion, The Tree of Life gives one nothing to work with at all.

It did, though, leave me pensive and in a contemplative mood. But. With nothing to contemplate it was an absurd mood to be in! It simply managed to piss me off. Late Friday afternoon would have been a perfect time to be in such a mood if only there was some content to the mood.

I did read through the entry for the movie at Wikipedia and while I agree that if one takes that interpretation then it makes reasonable sense, but I see absolutely no reason to do so. Perhaps that is what the filmmakers intended but, if so, I say that they failed. Brad Pitt’s character in no way—to me anyway—represents ‘Nature’ or even ‘nature.’ Nature is not obsessed with the freaking lawn! Nor is nature stuck in a dead end job and trying to grasp for what it can along the way. And Jessica Chastain’s character fails to embody ‘grace’ for me. And that is assuming one even buys into the whole lesson about one “must choose to either follow the path of grace or the path of nature.” [Wikipedia]

Now clearly, many people disagree with me about this movie (see the Wikipedia entry) and perhaps you, reader, are one of them. More power to you! I am glad that you enjoyed it, just as I am glad that Sara did. All of the above was based on my opinion and if I failed in a few cases to word it so explicitly then I apologize. Please take it that that is the case. I would not argue that your opinion of the movie is wrong or misguided as we all react to story, and the telling of it, in different ways.

Thankfully, later we watched Hysteria. That will be the next post.

Synopis: The Tree of Life: Sucks. Although many others have a vastly different opinion.

 

Campbell, The Hero with a Thousand Faces

This is the 4th book that I have finished in my Two-Thirds Book Challenge. I started it 6 October 2011 and finished it 15 January 2012. I had not intended to take so long but it is somewhat complex and, in all honesty, the rampant Freudianism/psychoanalysis is simply too much at times.

I have almost 6 pages of notes but I think I will ignore them for this review.

The central thesis is, I believe, reasonably sound. Although, certainly, it is not the only way to spin a description of cross-cultural mythology. It is in some of the (psychoanalytic) interpretation that the spinning out of control happens.

This past fall semester I took a course in classic literature and mythology, and as of today I finished a quick 3-week romp through 30 of the Grimm’s fairy tales. This book explains, or at least describes, much of what is present and happening in these stories.

One of the things I appreciated and respected is that Campbell clearly includes the stories of the Christian Bible–Old and New Testaments–in his analysis of myth.

One of the things I am unsatisfied with—I fear to be expected in Western culture and, in particular, with psychoanalysis—is the gendered explanation.

I do think the book is worth reading; some parts are certainly much better than others. In most places my notes are fairly detailed but in a few I wrote “This [such and such] is crap!” or “mumbo jumbo.”

I am going to provide a detailed list of the contents as perhaps that will provide the best overview of what the book contains/discusses:

Prologue: The Monomyth

  • 1. Myth and Dream
  • 2. Tragedy and Comedy
  • 3. The Hero and the God
  • 4. The World Navel

Part I: The Adventure of the Hero

  • Chapter I: Departure
    • 1. The Call to Adventure
    • 2. Refusal of the Call
    • 3. Supernatural Aid
    • 4. The Crossing of the First Threshold
    • 5. The Belly of the Whale/li>
  • Chapter II: Initiation
    • 1. The Road of Trials
    • 2. The Meeting with the Goddess
    • 3. Woman as the Temptress
    • 4. Atonement with the Father
    • 5. Apotheosis
    • 6. The Ultimate Boom
  • Chapter III: Return
    • 1. Refusal of the Return
    • 2. The Magic Flight
    • 3. Rescue from Without
    • 4. The Crossing of the Return Threshold
    • 5. Master of the Two Worlds
    • 6. Freedom to Live
  • Chapter IV: The Keys

Part II: The Cosmogonic Cycle

  • Chapter I: Emanations
    • 1. From Psychology to Metaphysics
    • 2. The Universal Round
    • 3. Out of the Void–Space
    • 4. Within Space–Life
    • 5. The Breaking of the One onto the Manifold
    • 6. Folk Stories of Creation
  • Chapter II: The Virgin Birth
    • 1. Mother Universe
    • 2. Matrix of Destiny
    • 3. Womb of Redemption
    • 4. Folk Stories of Virgin Motherhood
  • Chapter III: Transformations of the Hero
    • 1. The Primordial Hero and the Human
    • 2. Childhood of the Human Warrior
    • 3. The Hero as Warrior
    • 4. The Hero as Lover
    • 5. The Hero as Emperor and as Tyrant
    • 6. The Hero as World Redeemer
    • 7. The Hero as Saint
    • 8. Departure of the Hero
  • Chapter IV: Dissolutions
    • 1. End of the Microcosm
    • 2. End of the Macrocosm

Epilogue: Myth and Society

  • 1. The Shapeshifter
  • 2. The Function of the Myth, Cult, and Meditation
  • 3. The Hero Today

As a follow-up book to this one, I began another of my 2/3rds Challenge books, Mircea Eliade’s The Myth of the Eternal Return: Cosmos and History. It, too, is in the Bollingen Series. So far I am enjoying it. It is also a quite deep book and I am taking many notes. Thus, it may also take a while to get through.