Dunlap-Shohl – My Degeneration

My Degeneration: A Journey Through Parkinson’s (Graphic Medicine series) by Peter Dunlap-Shohl

Date read: 02 March 2016
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016gnc 2016nfc

Cover image for Dunlap-Shohl's My Degeneration

Paperback, 96 pages
Published 2015 by The Pennsylvania State Press
Source: Deschutes Public Library (Graphic Novel DUNLAP-SHOHL PETER)

Highly recommended.

Graphic Medicine series; Susan Merrill Squier and Ian Williams, general editors

“Books in the Graphic Medicine series are inspired by a growing awareness of the value of comics as an important resource for communicating about a range of issues broadly termed “medical.” For healthcare practitioners, patients, families, and caregivers dealing with illness and disability, graphic narrative enlightens complicated or difficult experience. For scholars in literary, cultural, and comics studies, the genre articulates a complex and powerful analysis of illness, medicine, and disability and a rethinking of the boundaries of “health.” The series includes original comics from artists and non-artists alike, such as self-reflective “graphic pathographies” or comics used in medical training and education, as well as monographic studies and edited collections from scholars, practitioners, and medical educators.” (Half title verso)

Other books in the Graphic Medicine series at WorldCat.

This personal account of Parkinson’s Disease from diagnosis through the next ten years of terror, struggle, acceptance, surgery, and post-surgery “tuning” is more than brave and illuminating.

It also utterly terrified me. Kind of like looking up some of my recent and current symptoms in a late night Internet search; which I generally avoid at all costs. The author was a political cartoonist for twenty-five years, most of which was pre-diagnosis.

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • 1. Diagnosis Blues
  • 2. Learning to Speak Parkinson’s
  • 3. Interview with a Killer
  • 4. Moping and Coping
  • 5. The Parkinson’s Prism
  • 6. Island of the Caring and Competent
  • 7. A Different Path
  • 8. Diagnosis, Reprise

The eight sections are all relatively short, considering it is only 96 pages total, and thus the book is a quick read but would also be well-suited for digesting more slowly a section or two at a time.

Highly recommended. I really enjoyed this book, if that is the correct idea. It was well-executed, is brutally honest, pulls no punches, is itself caring and thankful, and teaches those of us who know little of Parkinson’s quite a bit in a small, power-packed package.

This is the 20th book in my 2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge Sign-Ups

This is the 12th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Gunders – Waste Free Kitchen Handbook

Waste Free Kitchen Handbook: A guide to eating well and saving money by wasting less food by Dana Gunders

Date read: 17 February – 01 March 2016
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc

Cover image of Gunder's Waste Free Kitchen Handbook

Paperback, 200 pages
Published 2015 by Chronicle Books
Source: Own

Contents

  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction: Making a Difference
  • Part One: Strategies for Everyday Life
  • Part Two: Recipes
  • Part Three: Directory
  • Foodborne Illness
  • Notes
  • Index

“The author is a staff scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), and leads NRDC’s work on reducing the amount of food wasted across the country” (back cover).

The Introduction covers where food is wasted, what contributes to food waste in homes, what it takes to produce food, how wasting food saves money and resources, and how this is about “small, easy changes you can make in your daily food rhythm that will streamline your consumption” (21).

“My journey into becoming a food-waste warrior started at work, where I was researching how to improve farming. My aim was to help farmers use less water, fertilizers, and pesticides. But what I found startled me. After all the effort and resources that were being invested to get food to our plates, a huge amount of it was going uneaten! It occurred to me that no matter how organically or sustainably we grow our food, if it doesn’t get eaten, it doesn’t do anyone any good.

About 40 percent of all food in the United States does not get eaten.1 That’s crazy! It’s like buying five bags of groceries and then dropping two of the bags in the grocery store parking lot and not bothering to pick them up.

Collectively, consumers are responsible for more wasted food than farmers, grocery stores, or any other part of the food supply chain” (Introduction, 9).

You may have noticed the footnote in the above quote. The book contains a fair few (61 total) endnotes, many of which are to free and open sources. I have added the two citations used in quotes I am using near the bottom of this post.

Growing portion sizes come in for a bit of analysis in the Intro. “Portion sizes are now sometimes 2 to 8 tines larger than the standard serving sizes defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration7” (11). There is a chart on p. 12 showing the growth in portion sizes from 1982 to 2002 for nine food items. The smallest increase of 70% was for pepperoni pizza to 205% for soda and 400% for a chocolate chip cookie!

Part One covers Sage Shopping (tricks of the grocery trade, meal planning, shopping guidelines, and waste diagnostics), Smarter Storage (refrigerators, freezers, blanching, canning, pickling, drying, and root cellars; although these last four are simply overviews), The Crafty Kitchen (setting up your kitchen, tenets of mindful cooking, making the right amount, salvaging kitchen crises, leftovers, keeping food safe, and food waste management for parties), Can I Eat It? (what happens to food as it ages, expiration dates, and who should be particularly careful), Getting Scrappy (food scraps for and not for pets, things that can be (re)planted, household uses for scraps, and composting), and Go Forth and Go For It, which provides a short recap so far.

Part Two consists of 20 recipes ranging from infused vodkas through desserts and main dishes to side dishes by using food items that are nearing or just past prime.

Part Three covers Fruits; Vegetables; Meat, Poultry, and Seafood; Pantry Staples; Dairy and Eggs; Beans, Nuts, and Vegetarian Proteins; Oils, Condiments, and Spices. The Directory “… offers advice on how to store foods, how to freeze them, and how long they stay at their best quality. It also has helpful tidbits on ways to use parts that you might have thought were inedible, tips for reviving foods, and answers to questions like, “What are those brown spots?” (146)

It clearly cannot cover everything but it does have many, if not most, of the more normal fruits, vegetables, meats, etc.

Foodborne Illness addessses pathogens, toxins, Listeria, and pasteurization.

Recommended. A fairly quick read with lots of ideas, some more practical than others depending on your situation, which she does acknowledge. Early on the author comes across as a bit of a zealot but then this is a huge problem worldwide. See, for instance, Food Waste: The Facts by the United Nations Environment Programme, Regional Office of North Africa.

The scale of food waste is truly terrifying and criminally unjust.

1 K. D. Hall, J. Guo, M. Dore, and C. C. Chow, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “The Progressive Increase of Food Waste in American and its Environmental Impact,” PloS One 4 no. 11 (2009), e7940.

7 L. Young and M. Nestle, “Expanding Portion Sizes in the U.S. Marketplace: Implications for U.S. Counsleing,” Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 103, no. 2 (February 2003): portionteller.com/pdf/portsize.pdf [link verified 05 March 2016]

Actually the 12th nonfiction book for me this year but the review for number 11 is taking a while.

This is the 11th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Black – The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book

The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book by Jessica K. Black, N.D.

Date read: 06-16 February 2016
My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc

Cover image of Black's The Anti-Inflammation Diet and Recipe Book

Paperback, xii, 243 pages
Published 2006 by Hunter House
Source: Own

I actually read the follow-up book, More Anti-Inflammation Diet Tips and Recipes, back in July 2015. In my review at Goodreads I wrote:

“I really enjoyed this. Overall it is quite good and makes sense with very little frou frou. But, seriously, the only salt to eat is from one place on earth in Utah. I don’t think so.”

I gave it one more star than this one and I found a few more recipes to try. My wife has only read this one and found quite a few recipes. We need to start using them and trying some of the recipes or at least glean good ideas from them.

Contents:

  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Why an Anti-Inflammation Diet?
  • Ch. 1: Modern Health Paradigms
  • Ch. 2: Inflammation: What’s the Big Deal?
  • Ch. 3: The Importance of Diet
  • Ch. 4: The Anti-Inflammation Diet
  • Ch. 5: How to Use This Book
  • Recipes
    • Appetizers, Side Dishes, Seasonings, and Spreads
    • Breads, Muffins, and Tortillas
    • Breakfasts
    • Teas and Other Beverages
    • Entrées
    • Grains
    • Salads
    • Soups
    • Sweet Things
  • Appendix: Substitution Chart
  • References
  • Online Resources
  • Index

The early chapters do a good job of explaining the why and how and the benefits of an anti-inflammation diet. This is followed by about 175 pages of assorted recipes.

I do recommend it but suggest you try getting from a library first to see if it might benefit you. The second book is 7-years newer and so has some updated information; also some different information along with different recipes. Start with whichever one you can get your hands on.

This is the 10th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Hayden – The Story of My Tits

The Story of My Tits by Jennifer Hayden

Date read: 07-08 February 2016
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016gnc 2016nfc

Cover image for Hayden's graphic novel The Story of My Tits

Paperback, 352 pages
Published 2015 by Top Shelf Productions
Source: Deschutes Public Library [Graphic Novel HAYDEN JENNIFER]

I quite enjoyed this graphic novel. Well, as much as one can enjoy a book so full of disease and death. But it is also full of strong women (and a few strong men) who find ways to deal with what life throws at us; which makes it utterly full of life.

Jennifer Hayden was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 43. Her mother had already had a mastectomy just after Jennifer had graduated from college. This book is about how one small group of family and friends and their caregivers handle cancer and all that comes with it.

The book actually deals with many other issues around family, parenting, and everyday living.

Recommended.

This is the 15th book in my 2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge Sign-Ups

This is the 9th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Backes – Cannabis Pharmacy

Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana by Michael Backes

Date read: 08 January – 06 February 2016
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc

Cover image of Backes' Cannabis Pharmacy

Paperback, 272 pages
Published 2014 by Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers
Source: Deschutes Public Library [615.7827 BACKES MICHAEL] [Updated]

This is an excellent book. I highly recommend it for all public and academic libraries. It would be even more useful in states with medical cannabis laws but would be an excellent educational resource even in those without.

Contents:

  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Part 1: Cannabis as a Medicine
  • Historical Context
  • The Cannabis Plant
  • How Medical Cannabis Does and Doesn’t Work
  • How Cannabis Works Within the Body
  • Adverse Effects of Medical Cannabis
  • The Endocannabinoid System: A Brief Primer
  • Phytocannabinoids and terpenoids—The Principle Active Ingredients of Medical Cannabis
  • Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Chemotypes of Medical Cannabis
  • Part 2: Using Medical Cannabis
  • Metabolizing Medical Cannabis
  • Dosage: A Short Introduction
  • Storing Cannabis
  • Cannabis Contaminants, Pathogens, Pesticides, and Adulterants
  • Forms of Cannabis
  • Delivery and Dosing
  • Using Medical Cannabis in the Workplace
  • Part 3: Varieties of Medical Cannabis
  • What Makes a Cannabis Variety and Why It’s Important
  • … [Information on 27 specific varieties (see below)]
  • Part 4: Medical Uses of Cannabis
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • … [Information on 27 other conditions]
  • Stress
  • Cannabis and Adolescence
  • Cannabis and Children
  • Cannabis and Pregnancy
  • Cannabis and Preventive Medicine
  • Cannabis and Women’s Health
  • Cannabis  Dependence and Withdrawal
  • Notes
  • Selected Bibliography
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Acknowledgments

Comments

Not an all out pro-Cannabis stance by any means. Cannabis use—like anything we can put in our bodies—comes with risks. This book takes a clear-eyed look at all of them—as best as possible within our current knowledge. He discusses contaminants, pathogens, pesticides, and adulterants, THC tolerance, dependence and withdrawal, which terpenes do (or may) exacerbate which conditions, along with Cannabis use by adolescents, children, and pregnant women.

Backes also discusses the direction research (and the medical Cannabis  market) seems to be heading. As he writes in the Intro:

“The research collected herein is drawn from hundreds of recent studies, but this book hopes to present this evidence in an accessible manner for the layperson. Cannabis Pharmacy is designed to encourage further inquiry, so I have attempted to avail myself of as many open and accessible sources as possible in its creation, so that patients and physicians wishing to dig deeper may do so easily and inexpensively” (9).

Bravo, sir! And speaking of those references, there are 63 citations in Part 1, 11 in Part 2, and 235 in Part 4; 15 pages in total. The Selected Bibliography covers 5 full pages of the same small but legible type.

Strains

The basic template for each strain, all of which cover two pages (or more), is a couple opening paragraphs, a couple paragraph Notes section, a Medical Uses breakout box, and comments on each of the following items: type, species, breeding date, genetics, similar varieties, availability, ease of cultivation, aroma, taste, potency, duration of effects, psychoactivity, analgesia, muscle relaxation, dissociation, stimulant, and sedation.

Taste usually includes comments on smoking and vaporizing. The last six comment sections are, of course, relating the effect of that strain in that arena; so, the stimulant effect, for instance.

The Medical Uses section covers 29 disorders and some borader information in 5 sections under the head of “Cannabis and …,” along with one on dependence and withdrawal.

The disorders covered are: Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety disorders, arthritis, asthma, ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, autoimmune disorders, cachexia and appetite disorders, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome, diabetes, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal disorders, gerontology, glaucoma, hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, insomnia and sleeping disorders, migraine and headache, multiple sclerosis and movement disorders, nausea and vomiting, neuropathy, pain, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, seizure disorders, skin conditions, and stress.

The five “Cannabis and …” sections are listed above in the Contents listing.

Final comments

Well-balanced and as up-to-date as is currently possible. I hope that the author, or at a minimum the publisher, keeps this book current by revising it in the next couple years.

Highly recommended for all public and academic libraries, along with anyone interested in/concerned with medical cannabis; either as a patient, a caregiver, or a doctor or other medical folks.

This is the 8th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Williams & Crowell – A Pictorial History of the Bend Country

A Pictorial History of the Bend Country by Elsie Horn Williams and Jim Crowell

Date read: 15 January – 05 February 2016
My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc
No pic available
Hardback, 223 pages
Published 1998 [Rev., 2nd ed. cover title: The Bend Country: Past to Present] by The Donning Company Publishers
Source: Central Oregon Community College Barber Library [F 884 .B38 W54 1998]

I enjoyed this well enough; it had its moments. To either side of the pendulum. I learned a few things about Bend I hadn’t known and had a few others reinforced.

Contents:

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • I. 1825-1877
  • II. 1877-1900
  • III. 1900-1904
  • IV. 1904-1911
  • V. 1911-1915
  • VI. 1915-1920
  • VII. 1920-1933
  • VIII. 1933-1950
  • IX. 1950-1970
  • X. 1970-1983
  • XI. 1984-1998*
  • Bibliography
  • Author Biographies
  • Index

* Rev., 2nd ed. Ch. XI 1984-1998 (c)1998 by Jim Crowell. 1st ed. was 1983.

This is book of photos of the Bend area and its residents, along with captions providing context, divided up into chronological order. The photos within sections—and even across once or twice—are a bit looser.

Recommended if you are interested in Bend history. Not exactly a history as such but it is captioned historical photos.

[Of interest to no one except other book metadata geeks]

As a cataloger, let me say that this book is a mess! It does not help that the work itself doesn’t do the best job of representing itself, at least in the rev. 2nd edition I have at hand. There are records for both editions in Worldcat but the title is clearly different in the newer one. Or is it? The title page still says “A pictorial history of the Bend Country,” which according to the records should be the title of the first edition. But clearly on the cover, the spine, and the dust jacket of this edition it says the title is: “The Bend Country: Past to Present.” Title page verso has LC CIP which has the title as “Bend: a pictorial history.” Considering we use the title page as our main source it is correct. The MARC record does have an alternate title for the cover title. Still. Publishers you need to understand how things are cataloged if you want to rename works. Or generally.

This is the 7th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Lee and Hart – Messenger

Messenger: The Legend of Joan of Arc by Tony Lee and Sam Hart

Date read: 16 January 2016
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016gnc  2016nfc

Cover image from Lee and Hart's Messenger

Paperback, unpaged
Published 2015 by Candlewick Press
Source: Deschutes Public Library

Another quick read which I quite enjoyed. I am counting it under my 2016 Nonfiction Challenge also as it is based on historical facts. Clearly, the conversations are not “accurate” and so on but that could be the case in any biography. Just because a biography is relatively short and adapted to a graphic novel format does not mean it is no longer a biography nor no longer nonfiction.

This is maybe an hour read so still not a ton of time invested. I am sure I could have found some other way to learn as much about Joan of Arc in as little time but the Wikipedia entry would not have been near as entertaining.

The final page is also accurate but oh so highly entertaining. The things the Church does in the name of God. History weeps.

Recommended.

This is the 4th book in my 2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge Sign-Ups

This is the 4th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Hester – Vegan Slow Cooking

Vegan Slow Cooking for Two or Just for You: More than 100 Delicious One-Pot Meals for Your 1.5-Quart/Litre Slow Cooker by Kathy Hester

Date read: 14 January 2016
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc

Cover image of Hester's Vegan Slow Cooking

Paperback, 175 pages
Published 2013 by Fair Winds Press
Source: Crook County Library via Deschutes Public Library

The author also writes the blog Healthy Slow Cooking.

It seems I had looked at this book almost exactly a year ago and was not impressed. This time was seemingly (perhaps) different.

:: :: Below 19 January 2015 Skimmed :: ::

Is for 1.5 quart/liter slow cookers; ours is 3.5. While I’m not saying some of these don’t sound good I doubt I’ll be making Pear Rose Cardmom Oatmeal or Chocolate Pumpkin Brownie Breakfast Quinoa or Winter-Spiced Butternut Squash Pecan French Toast. Not in the slow cooker or probably at all.

Not for me.

:: :: This is what I wrote this morning after realizing I had written the previous last year and having a good laugh at myself :: ::

15 January 2016 Sara asked me to look this over yesterday and I ended up writing down a bunch of recipes, um, including that Chocolate Pumpkin … one. I was wondering while I was reading it last night whether that was just some crazy late evening approval of something I would wake up to and be disgusted by the idea of. Or maybe I’m just getting a little more liberal in my imagining of porridge.

Again, I found lots of possibilities but no idea if keepers. We have been having some issues with assorted recipes we’ve been trying lately as in they taste like crap or have bad textures or both.

The other issue which I need to go revisit is how many of these do I want for the recipe but will need to scale up for the larger slow cooker? There were some of the recipes which seemed to make sense in the one-two person size but we also do a lot of this to have leftovers so ….

:: ::

Anyway, I have potentially revised my opinion significantly on this one. I also can easily envision storing a smaller slow cooker. What I really want is a BIG one to get even more leftovers but I have a much harder time imagining where we might store an even bigger one in our small house.

Recommended if you cook for one or two and are looking for a range of slow cooker recipes that you could build off of. I mean it isn’t like you have to make Pear Rose Cardamom Oatmeal or Chocolate Pumpkin Brownie Breakfast Quinoa or Winter-Spiced Butternut Squash Pecan French Toast. You could tone those down, or up, as you see fit.

Contents:

  • 1 The Little Slow Cooker that Can!
  • 2 Budget Rescuers: Easy DIY Staples
  • 3 Morning Delights: Wake Up to Breakfast
  • 4 Dip Dinners: Appetizers or a Meal
  • 5 Soul Satisfiers: Soups for All Occasions
  • 6 International Eats: Stews, Curries, and Chili
  • 7 Tasty Fillings: Sandwiches, Tacos, and More
  • 8 Family Favorites: One-Pot Pastas, Risottos, and Pasta Sauces
  • 9 Vegan Squares: Full Meals Layered in the Slow Cooker
  • 10 Sweet Treats: Drinks, Syrups, and Desserts
  • Spice Resources
  • About the Author
  • Acknowledgments
  • Recipe List
  • Index

This is the 3rd book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Harris – Integrating Reality

Integrating Reality by Roy Harris

Cover image of Roy Harris' Integrating Reality

Date read: 05-13 January 2016
My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016poss 2016nfc

Paperback, 141 pages
Published 2012 by Bright Pen
Source: Own via Amazon

Contents:

  • Preface
  • 1 Integrating Reality
  • 2 The Truth Unvarnished
  • 3 Empiricism and Linguistics
  • 4 The Grammar in Your Head
  • 5 Systems and Systematicity
  • 6 Meaning and Reification
  • 7 Language and Languages
  • References
  • Index

Preface

“The theory of integrationism defended is that expounded in Introduction to Integrational Linguistics (Harris 1998), Rethinking Writing (Harris 2000) and After Epistemology (Harris 2009a). The basic points will not be recapitulated here.

    Instead, attention will be focussed on the more controversial corollaries of integrationist doctrine, and how they conflict with orthodox linguistics and orthodox philosophy of language” (1).

In chapter 1 Harris states “The following chapters discuss the ontological commitments of integrationism” (3). I would argue that the book just as much discusses many of the epistemological commitments, but rather in a more negative way by rejecting much of the epistemology of its chosen interlocutors.

This volume was a great improvement over Integrationist Notes and Papers 2013 as for having an intact scholarly apparatus. I only found four citations not in the References and one of those was twice to the same resource.

Not a great starting point into Integrationism but a good volume nonetheless if you know your way already or if you just want to read some critiques of standard linguistics and its varied (and often conflicting) ontological commitments.

This is the 2nd book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Fetter-Vorm – Trinity

Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

Date read: 11 January 2016
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016gnc 2016nfc

Cover image of Fetter-Vorm's Trinity

Hardback, 154 pages
Published 2012 by Hill and Wang
Source: Deschutes Public Library

An excellent and well-researched book that details the Manhattan Project and the Trinity test. From there it goes on to discuss Little Boy and Fat Man and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with some side excursions into events like the firebombing of Tokyo and many other Japanese cities.

We get the usual cast of characters and locations: Gen. Groves, Oppenheimer, Fermi, Lawrence, Szilard; Hanford, WA; University of Chicago; Oak Ridge, TN; and University of California, Berkeley.

Groves, then a Colonel, was given the task of overseeing the Manhattan Project after earning his reputation for overseeing the construction of the Pentagon (17). The logistics involved, not to mention the ridiculous sums of money or the secrecy, were incredible and the author tries to give the reader an appreciation for them.

The graphic novel leads the reader through the scientific and technical advances required to pull the off in a clear and understandable way. It then goes on to raise the question of whether it should have been done. It was understood by those at the top that if it was built it would most likely be used.

Bert the Turtle in “Duck and Cover” makes an appearance. If you are unfamiliar with “Duck and Cover” then YouTube that shit [or read about it at Wikipedia]. It is the kind of thing they were still indoctrinating kids with in the mid-to-late 60s when I was in grade school. It was my first introduction—at least that I remember—to the surreal. It would be years before I knew the word and its definition but there it was: a mind-boggling mixture of fact and fantasy, of hope gone awry. There I was under my desk, with my head down and hands on the back of my neck, somehow, knowing full well this was utterly batshit insane. Knowing that we could not survive this. I was 5 or 6-years old.

The book is not heavy-handed in any of its questioning, makes clear the scientific and technical details, and tries to give a sense of the immense scope of the project and its aftermath. There’s Teller and the 1st hydrogen bomb, Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD), “Duck and Cover,” and the permanent weapons industry which grew out of it. The US government alone has detonated more than 1,000 nuclear weapons (143). As we still do [from today’s newspaper].

Highly recommended.

This is the 2nd book in my 2016 9th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge Sign-Ups

This is the 1st book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader