Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny. Volume 2, Amphibia & Insecta

Manifest Destiny. Volume 2, Amphibia & Insecta by Chris Dingess (writer), Matthew Roberts (penciler & inker), Owen Gieni (colorist), Pat Brosseau (letterer)

Date read: 17 April 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Dingess, et al's. - Manifest Destiny. Volume 2, Amphibia & Insecta

Paperback, 1 volume unpaged

Published 2015 by Image Comics

Source: Own.

The survivors of La Charrette continue upriver. Beside themselves (“the evil that men do”), the expedition battles giant insects and amphibians while neither the land nor the river is safe. Another arch is encountered; again with dire results. We also learn how Lewis and Clark ended up on this expedition.

Highly recommended. For mature readers due to scenes of rape, gruesome death, bad language, etc.

My review of volume 1, Flora & Fauna, is located here.

[I apologize. I know this review needs more work but Monday defeated me early this week.]

This is the 50th book in my GN2015

Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny

Manifest Destiny. Volume 1, Flora & Fauna by Chris Dingess (writer), Matthew Roberts (penciler & inker), Owen Gieni (colorist), Pat Brosseau (letterer)
Date read: 01 April 2015
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover image of Dingess, et al. - Manifest Destiny

Paperback, 1 volume unpaged
Published 2014 by Image Comics
“Originally published in single magazine format as Manifest Destiny #1-6.”–T.p. verso.
Source: Deschutes Public Library (DINGESS CHRIS)

I quite enjoyed this twisted take on the Lewis and Clark expedition. Sadly, it is currently underway, so I got into it a bit too soon to get it from the library quickly. May have to buy the next volume. And. Then. I’d have to wait for even more. ::sigh::

Just called my local comics shop, Pegasus Books, and they’ll make sure to get it if it isn’t actually there. Fair enough.

The story opens on 23 May 1804 on the Missouri River with the party hopefully a day or two away from La Charette. According to the Timeline of the Lewis and Clark Expedition they passed the village on 25 May. So this really is beginning at the beginning. I am not going to check the full-on historical accuracy but having lived in Sioux city, Iowa for two years I am well aware of Sergeant Floyd [Yeah, yeah. I don’t know why they’re always big phalluses either].

The story line in this collection of the first 6 issues only covers another 5 or 6 days. This could get quite interesting. It could also go on for quite a while. I guess this title, while I still enjoy it, will be my direct monetary contribution to the comics industry. Otherwise, I do get most of my graphic novels from the library or read them on the Internet, or both. So I’ll quit complaining.

I re-read this 3 April to get a better feel for the story. I paid much better attention to the artwork this time and was richly rewarded. The detail is exquisite both aesthetically and also in the way it is used to tell the story.

The text on the back cover refers to “Captain Merriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark” but within the story they are both always referred to as “Captain,” if a title is used. Although York does refer to Clark as “Master.” The first is on page [7?] where Sergeant Parker bursts in and says, “Captain Lewis! Captain Clark! You need to see this!”

When Charbonneau and Sacagawea arrive Lewis states,” I’m Captain Lewis. And this is Captain Clark. You must be–” [?].

According the Lewis and Clark Expedition article it was Captain Lewis and Second Lieutenant Clark. Interesting. I wonder if they truly did just refer to him as “Captain.”

As for especially incredible images, see the flower picked by York [11?], the storyline of the large bird shot by Clark [4-5?] and the other places the bird then shows up. There are many, many other examples.

And just who, or what, is Sacagawea? And the baby?

This is the 44th book in my GN2015