2017 Reading Challenges & Goals

This post will cover my 2017 Reading Challenges and goals, as I know of them going into the year.

Generic goals: [xx = # finished in 2016]

  • More poetry; re-reading encouraged here [2]
  • More erotica, sex & gender [3]
  • More literature [1]
  • More librariana [1 in progress; slowly]
  • Translations same-ish [14]
  • More ebooks [8]
  • Nonfiction same-ish [54]
  • More essays and short stories [1?, unknown for sure]

Books currently reading being read [2017curr]

Finish all 4 of the books I am supposedly currently reading.

  • Hornsey – Alcohol and its role in the evolution of human society
  • Glushko, et al. – The Discipline of Organizing
  • Wellings – Why Can’t I Meditate?
  • Calvino – Six Memos for the Next Millennium

2017 Books To Read Challenge (personal) [2017poss]

2017 Books To Read Challenge (personal) post

“… total of 85 books (which includes some 8 on pause) I challenge myself to complete 2 from each of the 16 categories and a total of 35”

2017 “the looking all around list” Self-Reading Challenge [2017look]

2017 “the looking all around list” Self-Reading Challenge

At least 30 of 40 categories read in.

2017 A Novel Idea selection (Deschutes Public Library, Bend, OR)

Homecoming by Yaa Gyasi [A Novel Idea] I finished this on 01 January 2017 and it was excellent.

Sara and me entering Deschutes Public Library for the 2017 A Novel Idea unveiling (Dec 2016). Photo courtesy DPL.

Sara and me entering Deschutes Public Library for the 2017 A Novel Idea unveiling (Dec 2016). Photo courtesy DPL.

2016-2017 Author! Author! Literary Series

Author! Author! or here

  • Dave Eggers : 19 January 2017 [not reading anything for this]
  • Anthony Doerr : 4 February 2017 : All the Light We Cannot See
  • Siddhartha Mukherjee : 10 April 2017 : The Emperor of All Maladies

Categories I am tracking in 2017:

  • fiction
  • nonfiction
  • ebooks
  • translations
  • beer
  • biography / memoir
  • Central Oregon
  • cookery
  • erotica
  • essays 
  • graphic novels
  • history
  • language 
  • librariana 
  • literature 
  • on pause 
  • philosophy 
  • photography
  • poetry 
  • post 2016 election
  • renewal 
  • re-reads 
  • science
  • sex & gender
  • short stories
  • tech & software [2016poss only]
  • together
  • wander 
  • YA & children

Challenges hosted elsewhere

2017 Goodreads Challenge

My goal is 100 this year, same as last year.

2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge [2017gnc]

Image for 2017 10th Annual Graphic Novel & Manga Reading Challenge

Designed by Nicola Mansfield

24 for Bronze Age

The next two I also did last year and hope to do again but I have yet to see if they are being hosted so these are placeholders for now. The reason I am putting these here considering they are already included in my goals is that they require me to write reviews to get credit. I do not review every book I read but I do want to try to get many written so these goals/challenges help with that.

Update 03 January 2017: It does not appear these challenges are happening this year. The host has not posted anything at their blog since October and has not answered any comments regarding this year’s challenges. [I certainly hope things are OK in their lives.]

So I will redo these on my own terms.

Nonfiction Reading Challenge 2017 [2017nfc]

Master level 16-20 books (top)

Read a minimum of 50 nonfiction books and review a minimum of 25 of these.

Books in Translation Reading Challenge 2017 [2017trans]

Linguist 10-12 books (top)

Read a minimum of 16 translations and review a minimum of 12 of these.

Wrap-up

So … lots of diversity in my 2017 reading goals. I am looking forward to this year of reading.

Dunegan – Best Hikes Near Bend

Best Hikes Near Bend (A Falcon Guide)( Best hikes near series) by Lizann Dunegan
Date read: 6 April 2015 – 5 June 2016
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
Challenges: 2016nfc

Image of the cover of Lizann Dunegan's Best Hikes Near Bend

Paperback, viii, 223 pages
Published 2014 by FalconGuides
Source: Own

This one took me a while, primarily due to one or two very long reading breaks. It is actually a fairly quick read, if one were to read it cover-to-cover like I did.

Bottom line: Highly recommended for hiking in the vicinity of Bend.

The book is “endorsed” by the American Hiking Society, as their emblem is on the cover, but I can find no other info in the book regarding such agency. No idea if they are the premier US hiking organization or fall somewhere else on the spectrum. http://www.americanhiking.org/

The book contains 40 hikes around the Bend area. And, yes, Pilot Butte is hike #1, as it should be [Haven’t talked about the butte here in a while, have I?].

Here is the map used to show you what that means:

Image of the map showing region covered as near Bend.

There is also a short introduction with some [but not much] information on weather, flora and fauna, wilderness restrictions/regulations; a how to use this guide section; a trail finder which covers waterfalls, great views, for children, for dogs, streams, lakes, nature, and history.

Next comes the 40 hikes and then a 23-page section called the Art of Hiking, which covers the following: trail etiquette, getting into shape, preparedness [water, treating water, food, shelter, finding a campsite], first aid [general, sunburn, blisters, insect bites and stings, ticks, poison ivy, oak and sumac, snakebites, dehydration, heat exhaustion, hypothermia, frostbite, altitude sickness (AMS), Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)]; natural hazards [lightning, bears, mountain lions, other considerations]; navigation [maps, compasses, GPS, pedometers]; trip planning with checklists for day hikes and overnight trips; equipment [clothes, footwear, hiking poles, backpacks, sleeping bags and pads, cellphones; hiking with children, hiking with your dog; and an index.

Each hike has an overview which covers why you might be interested, what else you will see, etc. Then there is a big box with all of the important info summarized (start, distance, hiking time, difficulty (and why), trail surface, best season, ….

Then there is a more fleshed out description and photos, followed by a clear map of the hike, miles and directions [turn-by-turn, if you will], options and hike information.

I found the format to be clear and highly useful. I have done a few of these hikes but I look forward to doing several more; hopefully soon for one or two. The author also does a good job in the text of telling us where we need mosquito/insect repellent.

Highly recommended if looking for a hiking guide book of trails “near” Bend. Use the scan of the map above to determine whether they are near enough to Bend for you.

This is the 19th book in my Nonfiction Reading Challenge hosted at The Introverted Reader

Books read in 2015

It looks like I read 171 titles in 2015 with another 7 re-read which were previously read in other years and 2 re-read which were also first read in 2015. There were, of course, titles skimmed, put on pause and given up on.

This year I have been tracking my reading in a Google Sheet and at Goodreads. Still working out workflow for this mess of an activity; i.e., tracking book reading.

The first grouping will be data from my Google Sheet, followed by some from Goodreads, links to previous 2015 reading-related posts, and a list of titles read in 2015 by gross categories.

Google Sheet

This data consists of total entered in Sheet, breakdown of reading status of titles brought forward from 2014, titles entered in 2015 and their breakdown of reading status, reading challenges, books re-read, ebooks, “genre” breakdowns, and sources for the books.

Total

198 [all are in Goodreads]

Brought forward from 2014:

Total 7
Finished 3
On pause 3
Currently Reading 1

Entered  in 2015:

Total 191
Read 171
Gave up 4
Skimmed 3 [skimmed many I did not enter in Sheet; 34 in 2015 according to Goodreads]
On pause 11
Currently reading 8 + 1 started in 2016

Reading Challenges

My own reading goals for 2015: 9 Read [of 12 committed to] + 2 currently reading + 3 on pause. I may post on this separately but calling it met, if barely.

2015 Reading Challenge: 35* of 50 categories. I may’ve accomplished some of the others but I have no good way of knowing re a couple categories. Not concerned. I may post on this separately. Calling it met; had no real criteria in mind so 35 seems fair.

2015 8th Annual Graphic Novel/Manga Challenge: 52. Completed on 25 April 2015. In total, I read 99 graphic novels or manga [does not include rereads: 2015 2 + previous years 2 + 1 gave up] but did not post & link reviews for the challenge.

2015 Nonfiction Reading Challenge: 20. Completed 20 April 2015 [includes 1 reread from previous year + 3 in graphic novel challenge also; does not include 3 on pause or 1 I never reviewed]. I finished 68 nonfiction books but clearly did not review or link then to the challenge.

Goodreads 2015 Reading Challenge: Goal of 75, reached 29 April 2015. Recorded 166 books for 221% of goal. These totals do not include ~3 books re-read nor those titles read and re-read in 2015.

Books Re-read

Total 11
Read 1st in previous year 8 [Nonfiction/Beer, NF/Literature & Language, 2 Graphic Novels, 4 Lit]
Read 1st & 2nd in 2015 3 [Nonfiction/Beer, 2 Graphic Novels]

Titles Re-read

Saunders – Dinner in the Beer Garden
Doyle – Through the Magic Door
Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 1: Flora & Fauna $
Folio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Sleeping City (Girl Genius 13) $
Vaughan & Staples – Saga, Volume One
Vaughan & Staples – Saga, Volume Two
Adams – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
Adams – The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
Adams – Life, The Universe and Everything
Adams – So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
Boak & Bailey – Gambrinus Waltz $

[$ = read & re-read in 2015]

Ebooks

Total 36 + 2 on pause (1 each)
Kindle 3 finished (2 Beer, Erotica)(incl. 1 re/read 2015 Beer) + 1 on pause (Tech)
PDF 34 (2 Assorted, 30 Graphic Novels + 1 on pause (Tech)

I read so many PDF graphic novels as they are all from either the Girl Genius series via a Kickstarter or from a Dungeons & Dragons Humble Bundle I bought earlier in 2015. I have done a couple Humble Bundles and have read few of them; I tend to forget them. So I wanted to get to work on that and chose these first.

Genre

NF [includes 6 graphic novels, 1 of which is of war poetry + memoir]

Total 92
Finished 68
On pause 11
Currently Reading 7
Gave up 3
Skimmed 3

Fiction

Total 104
Graphic Novels 93 + 1 gave up
Erotica 2
Lit 8
Poetry 1 + 1 currently reading

Other Breakdowns

Photo 6
Beer 26 + 2 currently reading
Graphic novel 99 + 1 gave up [includes 11 manga & 6 nonfiction]
Erotica 2
Poetry 3
Memoir 3 + 1 gave up
Central OR 4 + 1 currently reading
History 10 + 1 currently reading
Translations 21

Together

Read 1
On pause 1
Switch to ind. reading 1
Currently reading 1

Sources

Own 92 + 3 more bought after getting from a library
DPL 77 + 1 gave up + 3 on pause + 1 skimmed + 3 then bought (1 of which still reading) + lots more skimmed. 85 total.
COCC 6
ILL 0 [acquired 2 : 1 gave up and 1 on pause]
Summit 6 + 2 currently reading
Friend 1

Goodreads

This data from my Goodreads account includes, 2015 Goodreads Challenge status, reading status breakdown, and some numbers from specific shelves (mostly used to verify same info from elsewhere).

2015 Challenge goal 75
Read 163 [does not include 7 re-reads]
Currently reading 8 + 1 from 2016
Gave up 2
Skimmed 34
On pause 6

Shelves

2015-gnc 61 [does not include rereads: 2015 2 + previous years 2]
2015nfc 21 [includes 1 reread from previous year; 1 review not written]
translation 21
together 1 + 1 currently reading + 1 on pause + 1 switched to individual reading

Other 2015 reading posts [re challenges, etc.]

List of 2015 Books Read by Category

Assorted

  • Quadback-Seeger – World of the Elements: Elements of the World
  • Attlee – Nocturne: A Journey in Search of Moonlight [on pause]
  • Backes – Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana [on pause]
  • Kondo – The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up
  • Stilgoe – Outside Lies Magic: Regaining History and Awareness in Everyday Places
  • Stivers – Hair of the Dog: Irish Drinking and Its American Stereotype
  • Scerri – The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction
  • Rubel – Bread: A Global History (The Edible Series)
  • Jung – Man and His Symbols [gave up]
  • Bishop – Living with Thunder: Exploring the Past, Present, and Future of the Pacific Northwest [currently reading]
  • Rothenberg, ed. – White Privilege: Essential Readings on the Other Side of Racism
  • Egan – The Good Rain: Across Time & Terrain in the Pacific Northwest [on pause]
  • Sahlins – Waiting for Foucault, Still
  • Babauta – Focus: a simplicity manifesto in the Age of Distraction

Assorted Cookery

  • Robertson – Fresh from the Vegan Slow Cooker
  • Steen & Noyes – The Great Vegan Protein Book
  • Scicolone – The Italian Slow Cooker

Assorted Memoir

  • Nguyen – Stealing Buddha’s Dinner [gave up]
  • Pollan – A Place of My Own: The Architecture of Daydreams

Beer & Brewing

  • Boak & Bailey – Brew Britannia: The Strange Rebirth of British Beer
  • Yaeger – Oregon Breweries
  • Allen and Cantwell – Barley Wine: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes
  • Mallett – Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse
  • Saunders – Dinner in the Beer Garden [re-read]
  • Dunlop – Portland Beer: Crafting the Road to Beervana
  • Amato – Beerology: Everything You Need to Know to Enjoy Beer … Even More
  • Fix – Principles of Brewing Science: A Study of Serious Brewing Issues
  • Coutts – The Perfect Keg: Sowing, Scything, Malting and Brewing My Way to the Best Ever Pint of Beer
  • Mosher – Mastering Homebrew: The Complete Guide to Brewing Delicious Beer
  • Barich – A Pint of Plain: Tradition, Change, and the Fate of the Irish Pub
  • Alworth – The Beer Bible
  • Nelson – The Barbarian’s Beverage: A History of Beer in Ancient Europe
  • Beechum and Conn – Experimental Homebrewing: Mad Science in the Pursuit of Great Beer
  • Acitelli – The Audacity of Hops: The History of America’s Craft Beer Revolution
  • Hornsey – Alcohol and Its Role in the Evolution of Human Society [currently reading]
  • Boak & Bailey – Gambrinus Waltz: German Lager Beer in Victorian and Edwardian London [read & re-read this year]
  • Palmer – How to Brew: Everything You Need to Know to Brew Beer Right the First Time
  • Bostwick and Rymil – Beer Craft: A Simple Guide to Making Great Beer
  • Mosher – The Brewer’s Companion: Being a Complete Compendium of Brewing Knowledge … [skimmed]
  • Foster – Pale Ale: History and Brewing Techniques, Recipes: History, Brewing Techniques, Recipes
  • Papazian – The Complete Joy of Home Brewing 4th ed
  • Hughes – A Treatise on the Brewing of Beer
  • Zainasheff & Palmer – Brewing Classic Styles: 80 Winning Recipes Anyone Can Brew
  • Oliver – The Brewmaster’s Table: Discovering the Pleasures of Real Beer with Real Food [currently reading]
  • Shales – Brewing Better Beers

Central Oregon

  • Dunegan – Best Hikes Near Bend (A Falcon Guide) [currently reading]

Central Oregon Memoir

  • Waterston – Where the Crooked River Rises: A High Desert Home

Central Oregon Memoir & History

  • Ramsey – New Era: Reflections on the Human and Natural History of Central Oregon

Erotica, Sex & Gender

  • Williams – Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History
  • Christina – Bending: Dirty Kinky Stories about Pain, Power, Religion, Unicorns, & More
  • Tyler, ed. – Luscious: Stories of Anal Eroticism

Graphic Novels

  • Foglio, et al. – The Secret Blueprints For Volume One (Girl Genius 0)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne & the Beetleburg clank (Girl Genius 1)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Airship City (Girl Genius 2)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Monster Engine (Girl Genius 3)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Circus of Dreams (Girl Genius 4)
  • Bendis & Maleev – Scarlet
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Clockwork Princess (Girl Genius 5)
  • B. and MacOrlan – The Littlest Pirate King
  • Pham – Sumo
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Golden Trilobite (Girl Genius 6)
  • Abnett and Culbard – The New Deadwardians
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Voice of the Castle (Girl Genius 7)
  • Kerascoët and Hubert – Beauty
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Chapel of Bones (Girl Genius 8)
  • Vehlmann & Kerascoët – Beautiful Darkness
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Heirs of the Storm (Girl Genius 9)
  • David and Lopez – Fallen Angel
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Guardian Muse (Girl Genius 10)
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Hammerless Bell (Girl Genius 11)
  • Mina, et al. – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Book 1
  • Mina, et al. – The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Book 2
  • TenNapel – Ratfist
  • Moon and Bá – De: Tales: Stories From Urban Brazil
  • Tobin and Dewey – I Was The Cat
  • Merveille and Tati – Hello, Mr. Hulot
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Siege of Mechanicsburg (Girl Genius 12)
  • Cruse – Stuck Rubber Baby
  • Pedrosa – Three Shadows
  • Perlow, et al. – Watson and Holmes: A Study in Black
  • Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 1: Flora & Fauna [read & re-read this year]
  • Collins & Rayner – Road to Perdition
  • Moning, et al. – Fever Moon: The Fear Dorcha
  • Lucke – The Lunch Witch (#1)
  • Wilson and Alphona – Ms. Marvel: No Normal
  • Wilson, et al. – Ms. Marvel: Generation Why 2
  • Dingess, et al. – Manifest Destiny, Vol. 2: Amphibia & Insecta
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 1: Cold Dead Fingers
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 2: Crossroads
  • Greenberg – The Encyclopedia of Early Earth
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 3: Bound
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 4: A Town Called Penance
  • Foglio, et al. – Agatha Heterodyne and the Sleeping City (Girl Genius 13) [read & re-read this year]
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 5: Winter Wolves
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth Gun: Book 6: Ghost Dance
  • Bunn and Hurtt – The Sixth gun: Book 7: Not the Bullet, But the Fall
  • Nolan – Hunters of the Great Forest
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume One [re-read]
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Two [re-read]
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Three
  • Vaughan and Staples – Saga, Volume Four
  • McCloud – The Sculptor
  • Carey, Willingham, et al. – The Unwritten: The Unwritten Fables, vol. 9
  • Carey & Gross, et al. – The Unwritten: War Stories, vol. 10
  • Miller & Varley – 300
  • Vance & Burr – Kings in Disguise: A Novel
  • Hagio – A Drunken Dream and Other Stories
  • Remender – Strange Girl Omnibus
  • Fawkes – The People Inside [gave up]
  • Moore & O’Neill – Nemo: Heart of Ice
  • Ralph – Daybreak
  • Kelso – The Squirrel Mother
  • Selznick – The Marvels
  • Doctorow and Wang – In Real Life
  • Fleisher, Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 1
  • Grubb, Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 2
  • Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 3
  • Mishkin, et al. – Dungeon & Dragons Classics, Volume 4
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms: Cutter
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 1
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 2
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 3
  • Grubb, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms Classics, Volume 4
  • Greenwood, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Forgotten Realms, Volume 1
  • Zub, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Legends of Baldur’s Gate
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt – Neverwinter Tales
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt, volume 1: Homeland
  • Salvatore, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: The Legend of Drizzt, Exile
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Shadowplague
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: First Encounters
  • Rogers, et al. – Dungeons & Dragons: Down
  • Foglio, et al. – Girl Genius: Second Journey Book One: The Beast of the Rails

Graphic Novels Manga

  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 1
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 2
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 3
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner Chamber, vol. 1
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 4
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 5
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner Chamber, vol. 2
  • Mori – A Bride’s Story 6
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner chamber, vol. 3
  • Yoshinaga – Ooku: The Inner chamber, vol. 4
  • Anno – Sakuran: Blossoms Wild

Graphic Novel Nonfiction

  • Redniss – Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie: A Tale of Love & Fallout

Graphic Novel Nonfiction History

  • Wilson, Dickson, et al. – Fight the power!: A visual history of protest among the English-speaking peoples
  • Stavans and Alcaraz – A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States
  • Bagge – Woman Rebel: The Margaret Sanger Story

Graphic Novel Nonfiction Memoir

  • Abirached – I Remember Beirut

Graphic Novel Nonfiction  War Poetry

  • Duffy, ed. -Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics

History

  • Schivelbusch – Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants
  • Swaby – Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World

History Memoir

  • Coe – Frontier Doctor: Observations on Central Oregon & the Changing West

Literature & Language

  • Ozecki – A Tale for the Time Being
  • Adams – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, #1) [re-read]
  • Adams – The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker’s Guide, #2) [re-read]
  • Adams – Life, the Universe and Everything (Hitchhiker’s Guide, #3) [re-read]
  • Adams – So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish (Hitchhiker’s Guide #4) [re-read]
  • Johnson – Rasselas, Prince of Abyssinia
  • Brontë – Wuthering Heights
  • King – Euphoria [2016 DPL A Novel Idea Selection]
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2009-2011
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2012
  • Harris – Integationist Notes and Papers 2013
  • Doyle – Through the Magic Door [re-read]
  • Ramsey – Thinking Like a Canyon: New and Selected Poems, 1973-2010
  • Gilbert – Collected poems [currently reading]

Literature & Language Graphic Novel War Poetry

  • Duffy, ed. – Above the Dreamless Dead: World War I in Poetry and Comics [also listed above]

Philosophy

  • Wilson – Second-Hand Knowledge: An Inquiry into Cognitive Authority [on pause]
  • Wellmuth – The Nature and Origins of Scientism
  • Berlin – The Power of Ideas [currently reading]

Photography

  • Atkeson – Oregon, My Oregon
  • Atkeson & Miller – Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s
  • Atkeson – Oregon II
  • Atkeson & Ross – Oregon III
  • Marbach and Pokarney – Oregon Harvest
  • Curtis – The North American Indian: The Complete Portfolios

Renewal

  • Huang and Lynch – Thinking Body, Dancing Mind: Taosports for Extraordinary Performance in Athletics, Business, and Life [on pause]
  • Kabat-Zinn – Full Catastrophe Living: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness [currently reading]
  • Johnson – The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason [on pause]
  • Segal – Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A New Approach to Preventing Relapse [on pause]
  • Levine – Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma: The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences
  • Farhi – The Breathing Book: Good Health and Vitality Through Essential Breath Work [currently reading]
  • Frankl – Man’s Search for Meaning
  • Smalley & Winston – Fully Present: The Science, Art, and Practice of Mindfulness
  • Krznaric – How To Find Fulfilling Work
  • Black – More Anti-Inflammation Diet Tips and Recipes
  • Wahls – The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine
  • Gunaratana – Mindfulness in Plain English
  • Krucoff – Healing Yoga for Neck and Shoulder Pain: Easy, Effective Practices for Releasing Tension and Relieving Pain [on pause]
  • Moore & Gillette – Lover Within: Accessing the Lover in the Male Psyche [on pause]
  • Cooksley – Seaweed: Nature’s Secret to Balancing Your Metabolism, Fighting Disease, and Revitalizing Body and Soul [skimmed]
  • Brantley & Millstine – Five Good Minutes in Your Body [skimmed]
  • Fallon – Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook That Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats

Tech & Software

  • Kissell – Take Control of Automating Your Mac [on pause]
  • Martinez and Stager – Invent to Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom [on pause]
  • Rawlins – Slaves of the Machine: The Quickening of Computer Technology [gave up]

Final Comments

I think this slices and dices this data more than enough for me this year. I would not mind having a breakdown of authors by gender but that is loaded with many problems (multiple authors, determining gender of some, etc.) and I am not that concerned about it. I read fairly widely and try to read from a diversity of diversities, knowing that I can always do better.

I want to keep reading things in translation; I feel I did well this year. I should try to read a bit more poetry and erotica, sex & gender this year. I am satisfied with the amount of re-reading, the number of ebooks, and of nonfiction. I hope to read a few less graphic novels and more varied things in literature & language; e.g., more actual lit, more on language and more poetry as previously mentioned. Maybe some re-reading there. Poetry books are close at hand.

All in all, I’m calling 2015 a good year for me and reading. I met all of my goals, and only one of them I feel could have been more solidly met.

I am very happy to be ending some part of my 2015 with a great score for the year. Particularly happy to have the thought documented.

Here’s to your (and my) reading in 2016.

[Post(s) coming soon]

 

Atkeson – Oregon III

Oregon III by Ray Atkeson. Text by Richard Ross

Date read: 15-29 March 2015

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Cover image of Atkeson's Oregon III

Hardback, 160 pages

Published [1987] by Graphic Arts Center Publishing Company

Source: Deschutes Public Library (OVERSIZE 917.95 ATKESON RAY)

This is the third installment in the Oregon series of photo books by Ray Atkeson put out by the Graphic Arts Center Publishing. I wrote about Oregon II here and about Oregon, My Oregon here (not part of this series but extremely related).

The text is by Richard Ross, whom the back flap describes as:

“a familiar figure to television audiences. for thirty-four years he gathered and wrote news stories, delivering them nightly from the anchorman’s chair, first in Seattle and then in Portland.

With two score and seven years of interviewing experience, Ross set out to meet and write about the people of Oregon. Oregon III, a tribute to the people and the land, is the culmination of his journey around the state and is his first published work.”

This volume fixes one of my gripes with previous ones. Its sections are organized geographically: Oregon Coast, Columbia River, Western Valleys, Cascade Range, Central Oregon, and Eastern Oregon. All of the photos are in color.

Each section is preceded by several pages of text by Ross which profiles the people he met in each region. The text for the first section, Oregon Coast, left me dreading the rest “blah blah this person blah that person.” It was boring. Thankfully the Columbia River section and a couple others were far better. Those seemed to be more historical (Columbia River) or in some other way of interest to me (Central Oregon; also more historical).

No idea who wrote the captions but it is possible it was Atkeson himself.

From the funnier side of life, in the Central Oregon section:

“As for the housing market, Bob [Chandler of Bend Bulletin] says he just hired a new city editor from San Jose who bought, for $90,000, a house that is better than the one he sold for $200,000. Bob says, “You can get the best bargains in housing in the United States of America in Bend, Oregon” (129).

While, in the photo caption on p. 134, we are reminded that “Bend, with a population of just over eighteen thousand, is the county seat of Deschutes County, ….”

Um. Yeah.

The Eastern Oregon section displays a horrific insensitivity:

“This is the land once claimed by Chief Joseph as the ancestral home of his Nez Perce Indians, and one look at the scenery, no less than spectacular, will show you why the Nez Perce fought so long to keep this land. …

Grace Bartlett, whose father owned the Bend Bulletin for several years, is in her seventies and lives right across the road from her daughter’s ranch. Grace has written a lot about the relations between the Nez Perce Indians and the settlers. After the Nez Perce War and the Bannock-Payute uprising in 1878, people really started moving into this part of the country. They were mostly stockmen and farmer—vigorous people with no money, but willing to face real hardships. She says, “This is very rough country to survive in. The weather is very severe and unpredictable. It took people with a grew deal of intelligence as well as ‘guts’ to make a go of it here”” (145).

So the Nez Perce weren’t people, nor were they intelligent, nor did they have guts. What. The. Serious. Fuck!?

Anyway. I still much prefer Atkeson’s black and white work, at least as presented in Oregon, My Oregon or more narrowly in Ski & Snow Country.

This is the 19th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Yaeger – Oregon Breweries

Oregon Breweries by Brian Yaeger

Date read: 08 February – 19 March 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Yaeger's Oregon Breweries book

Paperback, xx, 396 pages

Published 1 December 2014 by Stackpole Books

Source: Own (Amazon 3 December 2014) [According to WorldCat neither Deschutes Public Library or COCC’s Barber Library have it.]

Contents:

  • Acknowledgments
  • Foreword
  • Introduction
  • Portland
    • Northwest Portland
    • Southwest Portland
    • Southeast Portland
    • Northeast Portland
    • Portland Metro
  • Coastal
  • The Gorge-Eastern
  • Willamette Valley
  • Bend and Central
  • Southern
  • Beer Festivals
  • Bottle shops and Taprooms
  • Breweries to Come
  • Cheesemakers
  • Cideries
  • Portland Coffee Roasters

Commentary:

Let me state right up front that I enjoyed this book. More importantly, I find it valuable. For me, the factual data—the listing of so many of Oregon’s breweries in one place along with information on them—is what matters. The individual “story” of every brewery, or at least as told by the author, is not my main focus by any stretch, even though some are quite interesting.

I also appreciate how amazingly difficult it would be to write so many entries of basically the same information for all these breweries all the while trying to make them sound different. I would not relish that task. That said, the strain shows on occasion. And sometimes I imagine others might appreciate the author’s humor more than me.

Some “factual” and other issues first:

Full Sail is included in the Coastal group when it should be in The Gorge-Eastern, while Oregon Trail is included in Southern instead of Willamette Valley.

There are two listings of the breweries. The first is in the table of contents where they are separated into areas/regions (such as, Northwest Portland or Bend and Central) and then listed alphabetically. The second is the Brewery Locations map which lists them all alphabetically and then gives each a number that corresponds to, basically, the county it is in. That means all of the Portland breweries have one number (2) on the map.

A separate map of Portland, divided by quadrants, would be most useful!

I also realize that alpha order is easy but that doesn’t make it the right organizational tool, especially if you have multiple tools available. Some of the areas/regions would be harder than others but Coastal could go north to south or vice versa and The Gorge-Eastern could also easily go east to west, etc. That would make “small,” regional visit planning easier. This is not everybody’s use case though so not sure this is an entirely fair critique.

Each section has an intro that gives a quick overview of the region, along with a nice listing of non-beer-related places to visit. Each brewery entry generally consists of the following sections of info: Name and address, contact info, logo; textual entry; Beers brewed; The Pick; and a listing of other info like hours. Each full entry is from one to three plus pages and a few do not have The Pick and a few also do not have Beers brewed.

In the textual entry we get Yaeger’s impressions, perhaps an origin story or some other hook, and other facts or interesting tidbits. Beers brewed is what it purports to be, while The Pick is Yaeger’s pick from his visit. May not be available when you visit, of course.

The textual entry makes up most of the space in a brewery’s entry once past one page, so it is kind if interesting to see who gets more pages and who doesn’t (see, e.g., Ale Apothecary and Barley Brown’s). The final bit of info contains: Opened (year), Owner(s), Brewer(s), System, Annual production, Distribution, Hours, Tours, Takeout beer, Gift shop, Food, Extras. Some have less info at the end but most contain the same bits of data.

As I said up top, the strain of writing so many similar, yet hopefully different, entries took its toll once in a while. I certainly am not going to point out all of the minor distractions but I do want to point out a few.

Logsdon Farmhouse Ales

“In the mid-eighties, Logsdon cofounded neighboring Full Sail Brewery, then colaunched yeast industry giant Wyeast Labs, so naturally the beers he and partner Chuck Porter make are yeast-forward saisons” (207).

Um, no, that doesn’t follow. “Yeast-forward” follows, perhaps. But “saison” most certainly does not. Full Sail is not particularly known for saisons and Wyeast has quite a few strains of yeast.

BricktownE Brewing Co.

“BricktownE’s location was built in the 1890s, according to owner and craft beer crusader Craig McPheeters, and a brothel used to operate upstairs. You could call their Workin’ Gal BrownE Ale, which busts a nutty flavor and mouthfeel, an homage.” (344).

Um. OK. He really did go there.

Caldera Brewing Co.

“Another amazing treat from my last visit was intended to be a replica of Red Sea, just like Mills brewed in Kona, but they accidentally left Mogli’s bourbon, chocolaty oak spirals in the fermentation tank. The resulting warming vanilla …” (347).

Wait. I’m supposed to drink beer from a brewery that can’t even begin to clean a fermentation vessel properly? If they leave physical items in their tanks accidentally, deity only knows what else is “left.” I think the story is probably something else and worded poorly. At least I hope so.

Draper Brewing

“He has experience at some small-by-most standards breweries including Lost Coast and Mad River, both in Humboldt County, which makes sense since he’s originally from Northern California. Mad River happens to be one of my favorite breweries from that area, so it stands to reason that he has folded some of the tricks he picked up there into his own operation” (350).

Not the way causation, or grammar, works. The last clause follows from the first clause of the first sentence but not from the clause it follows. The author’s liking of Mad River has nothing to do with any of the other clauses. Stackpole’s editors seem to be nodding off once in a while.

Walkabout Brewing Co.

“Nearly as popular is Jabberwocky, perhaps with the implication that each 22-ounce bottle implores you, in its best Lewis Carroll voice, to “drink me” (374).

Wrong character in a completely different work. Easy cultural references and allusions aren’t always good ones. And,, yes, I know that most people won’t get the difference, or care. But literature matters. Literary allusion matters.

Again, this had to be a very tough job and the author has done a fine job with a limited amount of space for each entry on the many, many breweries we have in Oregon. I’m not trying to nitpick by pointing out the above but show that there are some small issues; reasons for which I only rated it 4-stars.

Breweries to Come

[Keep in mind this book was released 1 December 2014; that is, is quite new]

This is a two-page listing of the breweries in the process of becoming operational; that is, in planning and/or outfitting.

Of the two mentioned for Bend, one (North Rim) has been open a while now and at least one other not listed (Monkless Belgian Ales) is also already open.

Also not listed, Craft Kitchen and Brewery is replacing Old Mill Brew Wërks, which is out of business.

Immersion Brewing has been announced.

Redmond’s scene is definitely growing. See the bottom of Jon’s post here for some new ones.

The problem with these sorts of books is that they are out-of-date as soon as they are published. For a place like Oregon even before publication. Remember, release date was not even four months ago.

I would really love to see this sort of thing as a wiki, with accompanying map(s), and various ways to slice and dice the data. Perhaps the Oregon Brewers Guild should do such a thing (just do it well!) and you could get access with SNOB membership. Wouldn’t help out-of-state visitors or the simply inquisitive and not-yet-converted.

Honestly, I just want it open and available. But who will maintain it? A definite early-21st century issue. This is not a dig on Yaeger’s book but on the entire class of book like this. His has superseded, at least partly, two other books. Neither of which is that old. His will be too. Soon.

Anyway, for the most up-to-date listing of Central Oregon breweries (and their order of operation) just look in Jon’s sidebar at the Brew Site.

Again, I think this is a darn fine book of its type. For me it will serve as a reference book (I did purchase a copy after all). I have already used it extensively in making plans for our trip this week to Portland.

This post is cross-posted at my other blog, Bend Beer Librarian, since that is where the beer writing (mostly) goes.

This is the 17th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson – Oregon II

Oregon II by Ray Atkeson; text by Archie Satterfield

Date read: 21-26 February 2015

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Hardback, 182 pages

Published 1974 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing

Source: Deschutes Public Library [OVERSIZE 917.95 ATKESON RAY)

Not near as impressed with this as I was with Oregon, My Oregon or even Ski & Snow Country.

In those books all of the photographs were black & white and we were provided both historical and technical details by contributors highly qualified to do so. This book has only color photos and the text by Archie Satterfield consist of an eight-page essay to Oregon and, I assume, the photo captions are also by him. But in neither case do we learn anything about the historical and technical details of these photos. Or why they are even all color.

Despite carting home this heavyweight and its equally stout companion, Oregon III, and the not light but more middling-sized, Wind on the Waves, I almost did not read this. Atkeson’s color photos (based mostly on this book) simply do not draw me in like his black & white photos do. Better editorial selection? Or do I just prefer his work in b&w?

What drew me in, even though I still had to force my way through the Satterfield essay (which is OK in its own right; just not what I am looking for), was the two-page photo (pp. 8-9) of the Cascades at sunset looking west from the top of Pilot Butte. I immediately recognized the view, despite it being an “impossible” one. That is, not a human eye perspective. The photo is mostly shades of gold and browns, while the sunset silhouettes cause lots of interesting flattening in the depth-of-field. But it isn’t quite flat, not in all places. I am not going to try and describe it any further; let us just say, it has depths. Then again, I do not particularly think it is a great photo at all. It is an interesting one though.

The perspective in the photo is quite intriguing, as I hinted at. My guess, based on information on Atkeson’s technique (at least in b&w) in Oregon, My Oregon was to use the “extra” resolution of his 4×6 camera to take larger landscapes and then crop out the portion he wanted. Based on the perspective of this photo he had to do something similar. This is a piece of a much larger negative. There is no other way to compress and flatten the foreground so much without a telephoto lens which would seriously narrow the angle and we would have far less peaks in view. By the way, I talked about foreground in the previous paragraph but that is what is entirely missing from this print. The foreground of the photo has been removed in printing.

So … larger negative, piece of. Interesting. But now I want to see the whole negative. And did Atkeson compose the entire picture in the viewfinder and then still enlarge sections out or did he compose the shot he wanted and only ensure he had enough “extra” around it to do whatever he was looking for with perspective, etc.? So many questions and no hints of an answer.

By the way, there was an Oregon in 1968 by Atkeson with text by Charles H. Belding. It was “one the most successful books in the history of regional publishing, [but] has gone out of print to make way for this fresh look …” (front flap).

I liked it well enough but I simply am not roused by Atkeson’s color photos—or at least those selected for this book. I will try poking at Oregon III, which has text by Richard Ross, and at Wind on the Waves, with lots of text by Kim R. Stafford. Both of those also contain all color photos.

This is the 13th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Ramsey – New Era

New era : reflections on the human and natural history of Central Oregon by Jarold Ramsey

Date read: 07-26 February 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of  Ramsey's New Era

Paperback, 154 pages

Published 2003 by Oregon State University Press

Source: COCC Barber Library (F 876.5 .R36 2003)

I found this while verifying that there is a second copy of the previously reviewed Atkeson book on the library shelves.

I truly enjoyed this book and will be acquiring a copy to own: there are several stories, some useful leads in my local history question, and some intriguing points of view that I want to revisit.

Ramsey’s language is of the common person, yet fluid and often beautiful. We heard the author speak at our public library just two days after I checked out the book. He told us a very schematic Native American folktale from the Central Oregon region and then proceeded to embellish it by looking at it academically and following up leads and sources until it is was fleshed out as it can be. It was wonderful exercise. “The Farm Boy, the Homesteader, and the Old Indian: Conserving a Story” is a similar sort of exercise that he undertakes in this volume.

Contents:

  • Introduction
  • New Era: Growing Up East of the Cascades
  • The Farm Boy, the Homesteader, and the Old Indian: Conserving a Story
  • Going Around the Mountain
  • The Kiln
  • Opal City
  • Quincey’s Ladders: A Fishing Tale
  • The Canyon
  • Two Homesteads
  • An Impromptu on Owning Land
  • Notes

“New Era” tells of growing up in Central Oregon and of the one-room schoolhouse he attended. I already mentioned “The Farm Boy, …” above. “Going Around the Mountain” tells the story of a family trip in the summer of 1949 to circumnavigate Mount Jefferson. “The Kiln” and “Opal City” are about just what they say there are. “Quincey’s Ladder” is about a prime fishing spot and so much more. “The Canyon” is indeed the story of a canyon, while “Two Homesteads” is a comparative study of two ranches. “An Impromptu …” is also well-advertised as to topic.

Highly recommended for lovers of Central Oregon history, Ramsey’s other literary endeavors, or fans of stories of the homesteading era.

This is the 12th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson and Miller – Ski & Snow Country

Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s by Ray Atkeson; essay by Warren Miller

Date read: 11-12 February 2015

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Cover of Ski & Snow Country: The Golden Years of Skiing in the West, 1930s-1950s by Ray Atkeson

Hardback, 120 pages

Published 2000 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing

Source: Deschutes Public Library (796.93 ATKESON RAY)

Another excellent collection of 100 black & white images of Atkeson’s ski and snow pictures. Based on technique alone these images ought get 5 stars but as the title suggests the focus is narrower than in Oregon, My Oregon and skiing is not something I ever took up. In fact, this book has been quite educational to see how short of a period of time good equipment for the masses has actually been available. I must admit the tug of some of the action shots but I think it’s beyond the time I might take up downhill skiing. Perhaps cross-country at some point but we need to use our snowshoes more first. Not that we’ve had much opportunity this winter whether we wanted to or not.

The introductory essay is by Warren Miller, famous skiing filmmaker. The two became friends in 1949, meeting in Squaw Valley. The essay was written in 2000 and as the note to readers says on the title page verso:

“There are undoubtedly some errors in dates, time, and places in this book due to most events happening fifty or more years ago. I have tried to be as accurate as my memory of the events and the occasional phone call for verification allows. — Warren Miller”

Highly recommended, especially for fans of skiing, skiers, those interested in the early decades of skiing in the western US, and anyone who simply enjoys black & white photos of snow (and often other things along with the snow).

This is the 10th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair

Atkeson – Oregon, My Oregon

Oregon, My Oregon by Ray Atkeson; essay by Catherine Glass; compilation, photo editing & printing and research by Thomas Robinson

Date read: 05 February 2015

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Cover of Atkeson's Oregon, My Oregon

Hardback, 128 pages

Published 1998 by Graphic Arts Center Publishing in cooperation with the Oregon Historical Society

Source: Central Oregon Community College Barber Library. (F 877 .A797 1998) My wife has checked it out.

I discovered this gem of a portrait of my adopted state by one of its preeminent photographers because my wife has it checked out along with other Oregon/Central Oregon books.

The photos are all black and white and are from the late 1920s to the 1960s, past the time Atkeson had become famous for his color photography too. The photo captions were researched and written by photo compiler, printer and historian Tom Robinson and provide a fair bit of context. Photos from Atkeson’s commercial work, his freelance work and work he simply shot for his own pleasure are all represented. Together they paint a fascinating portrait of several decades of industry, travel, sport, portraiture and landscape in Oregon.

“Tom Robinson researched the photos included in Oregon, My Oregon by reviewing hundreds of thousands of Photo Art Studio negatives housed in the collections of the Oregon Historical Society and the more than ten thousand negatives in the Atkeson family collection. Examining each negative on a light table with a television camera set up to reverse the image from a negative to a positive on the monitor, Tom selected four hundred. Then he took the negatives to his darkroom and printed them. His circa 1940s enlarger, which he describes as “a behemoth Saltzmann that weighs almost as much as a small car,” is generally regarded as the finest large-format enlarger. He had it fitted with new Nikkor lenses and a multicontrast light head.

His mission was demanding and complex: modern printing techniques do not apply to old negatives, the old negatives do not fit modern paper, their very sensitive emulsions are often on the crumbling edge of disintegration, and they require darkroom gymnastics to address their density ranges. Nevertheless, Tom Robinson met these and other challenges, in addition to researching and writing the captions” (from “Ray Atkeson in Black and White” by Catherine Glass, 16).

My favorites:

  • Farm Photo, circa 1947-1948. Young boy carrying big bag of hops to the barn in Marion County (17).
  • Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer, April 17, 1940. PBR truck, cases of beer and salesmen in front of the distributors (1537 Southeast Grand Ave., Portland) (20).
  • Desert Road, 1944-1945. Near Burns, Oregon (30).
  • Windstorm at Timberline, 1955. Shot by his wife, Mira (37).
  • Columbia Steel Casting, Machinery and Operations, July 25, 1944 (Portland’s Montavilla neighborhood) (53).
  • Mary Carroll, 1942 (May’ve been one of the two first women to work in America’s maritime shipyards) (55).
  • Threshing Grass, circa 1945, Grande Ronde Valley (62).
  • 301 Restaurant, April 28, 1943 (African-American club; now the I-84 eastbound entrance from I-5 northbound) (68).
  • Jacksonville Cemetery, 1945. Jacksonville, Oregon (70).
  • Horse-seining, 1945. Using horses to seine for salmon at Astoria (86).
  • Smith Rocks and Crooked River, circa May 1936 (94).
  • Vanport Flood, May 31, 1948. What was Vanport, Oregon (102)
  • Eagle Creek Punchbowl, early 1940s. (111).
  • Art and Howie Doing a Double Geländsprung, circa 1948. Resort at Anthony Lakes (117).
  • Herringbone Tracks, circa 1940. Salmon River Canyon on Mount Hood (119).

Many of the photographs, whether favorites or not, are technical masterpieces based on a keen eye, an intimate study of light, and a willingness and determination to be in the right spot at the right time. Many are testaments to times and places no longer here, while also making strong social statements. Granted those statements may be vastly different than the ones they may’ve made when shot decades ago but that does nothing to lessen the impact of a photo such as 301 Restaurant or Vanport Flood then and today.

I can only begin to imagine what stories are told in the 100,000+ extant photos held by the Oregon Historical Society and those of the Atkeson family. I am looking forward to checking out more of his books.

May be my 2nd favorite book of photography by a single artist. Elliott Erwitt’s Personal Exposures is probably my favorite.

Highly recommend for fans of Oregon and fans of individual photographers who excelled at most every form of photography extant during their career.

This is the 6th book in my Traditional Chesterfield armchair