This page serves as a list of Published Subject Indicators for Mark's LIS590TML Topic Map on Bibliographic Relationships.

All definitions unless otherwise specified are from: Tillett, Barbara B. "Bibliographic Relationships: An Empirical Study of the LC Machine-Readable Records." Library Resources & Technical Services 36 (2), April 1992: 162-188

All examples are from: Tillett, Barbara B. "A Taxonomy of Bibliographic Relationships." Library Library Resourcers & Technical Services 35 (2), April 1991: 150-158

Tillett, Barbara B. "Bibliographic relationships." In Bean & Green, Eds. Relationships in the Organization of Knowledge. Information Science and Knowledge Management, v. 2. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001: 19-35.

Green, Rebecca. "Relationships in the Organization of Knowledge: An Overview." In Bean & Green, Eds. Relationships in the Organization of Knowledge. Information Science and Knowledge Management, v. 2. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001: 3-18.

bibliographic relationships

"a bibliographic relationship is an association between two or more bibliographic items or works" (Tillett 1991, 150)
"Bibliographic relationships broadly defined include all relationships involved in the descriptive cataloging of bibliographic units, whether considered as physical or material units, on the one hand, or as intellectual units, on the other hand" (Green, in B&G, 7).
"In the context of the model, relationships serve as the vehicle for depicting the link between one entity and another, and thus as the means of assisting the user to "navigate" the universe that is represented in a bibliography, catalogue, or bibliographic database." (FRBR, 5.1)

equivalence relationships

hold between exact copies of the same manifestation of a work or between an original item and reproductions of it, as long as the intellectual content and authorship are preserved. Examples:

derivative relationships

hold between a bibliographic item and a modification based on that item. Examples:

descriptive relationships

hold between a bibliographic item or work and a description, criticism, evaluation, or review of that item or work. Examples:

whole-part relationships

hold between a component part of a bibliographic item or work and its whole. Examples:

accompanying relationships

hold between a bibliographic item and the bibliographic item it accompanies, such that the two items augment each other equally or one item augments the other principal or predominant item. Examples:

sequential relationships

hold between bibliographic items that continue or precede one another, but are not considered derivative. Examples:

shared characteristics relationships

hold between a bibliographic item and another bibliographic item that is not otherwise related but coincidentally has a common author, title, subject, or other characteristic used as an access point in a catalog. Other examples:

close content relationships

"[C]an be viewed as a continuum starting from an original work, including equivalence, derivative, and descriptive (or referential) relationships" (Tillett 2001, 31)